Category Archives: IYS Themes

Making WASH facilities accessible for the disabled and elderly

Horizontal handrail the full width of the door on the inside. Internal bolt.

Horizontal handrail the full width of the door on the inside. Internal bolt. Credit: WaterAid/Stephen Sagawa

WaterAid has published a compendium of low-cost technologies to improve the accessibility of household WASH facilities for the disabled and elderly in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa. There are sections on reaching facilities, latrines, bathing, waterpoints and handwashing. It can be used by staff such as health workers and community volunteers.

Cover - Compedium of accessible WASH technologies

The compendium and all images in it are free to download at: www.wateraid.org/accessibleWASHtechnologies

Related web sites:

2014 issues of the WASHplus Weekly

Below are links to the 2014 issues of the WASHplus Weekly. There were 8 issues on HAP/cookstoves, 4 issues on WASH & Nutrition, 2 issues on handwashing, and 8 issues on CLTS and other sanitation topics. Other topics include Learning from Failure, Ebola and WASH-related diseases, Multiple-Use Water Services, etc. WASHPlus_HTMLbanner_weekly_600x159

2014

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PLoS One – Does Global Progress on Sanitation Really Lag behind Water?

Does Global Progress on Sanitation Really Lag behind Water? An Analysis of Global Progress on Community- and Household-Level Access to Safe Water and Sanitation. PLoS One, Dec 2014.

Authors: Oliver Cumming, Mark Elliott, Alycia Overbo, Jamie Bartram

Safe drinking water and sanitation are important determinants of human health and wellbeing and have recently been declared human rights by the international community. Increased access to both were included in the Millennium Development Goals under a single dedicated target for 2015. This target was reached in 2010 for water but sanitation will fall short; however, there is an important difference in the benchmarks used for assessing global access.

For drinking water the benchmark is community-level access whilst for sanitation it is household-level access, so a pit latrine shared between households does not count toward the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target. We estimated global progress for water and sanitation under two scenarios: with equivalent household- and community-level benchmarks.

Our results demonstrate that the “sanitation deficit” is apparent only when household-level sanitation access is contrasted with community-level water access. When equivalent benchmarks are used for water and sanitation, the global deficit is as great for water as it is for sanitation, and sanitation progress in the MDG-period (1990–2015) outstrips that in water.

As both drinking water and sanitation access yield greater benefits at the household-level than at the community-level, we conclude that any post–2015 goals should consider a household-level benchmark for both.

Grand Challenge: Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is launching a new Grand Challenge: Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development. This challenge focuses on how to effectively reach and empower the most vulnerable women and girls to improve health and development – including economic – outcomes as well as gender equality.

Women_girls_350x233

Gender inequalities and the marginalization of the needs, roles and potential of women and girls are key factors limiting advances in development outcomes for all – women, men, boys, girls and their communities and societies around the world. Moreover, strong associations have been identified between addressing inequalities and enhancing women and girls’ empowerment and agency, and improved development outcomes across sectors, ranging from maternal, newborn, and child health and nutrition to agriculture, water, sanitation, hygiene and financial services for the poor.

The ultimate goal of this challenge is to accelerate discovery of how to most effectively and intentionally identify and address gender inequalities and how this relates to sectoral outcomes; scale-up approaches known to work, in context-relevant ways; and do more to develop better measures of the impact of approaches to enhance women’s and girls’ empowerment and agency. Intentional efforts and strategies are required so that development can contribute more to gender equality and gender equality can contribute more to development.

Grants will go to investigators in low- and middle-income countries, but we encourage partnerships with investigators in other countries, especially where the opportunity exists to build on existing collaborations.

WASHplus Weekly: Focus on WASH & Nutrition

WASHplus Weekly | Issue 171| Dec 12, 2014 | Focus on WASH & Nutrition

This issue provides updates on new resources since the September 2014 WASHplus Weekly on WASH and nutrition with links to a December 15, USAID webinar; the recently published Global Nutrition Report; presentations at the UNICEF Stop Stunting Conference in India; and just-published studies on stunting, environmental enteropathy, and other WASH and nutrition topics.

EVENTS

December 15, 2014, Draft Guidance for USAID-Funded Nutrition-Sensitive ProgrammingLink
During this webinar, Richard Greene, senior deputy assistant administrator with USAID’s Bureau for Food Security, will share a two-page draft guidance document that will assist implementers in applying the new USAID Multi-Sectoral Nutrition Strategy to nutrition-sensitive agriculture programs.

November 19–21, 2014, The Second International Conference on Nutrition
(ICN2)
Link | Vision statement
The Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) was a high-level intergovernmental meeting that focused global attention on addressing malnutrition in all its forms. The two main outcome documents—the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and the Framework for Action—were endorsed by participating governments at the conference, committing world leaders to establishing national policies aimed at eradicating malnutrition and transforming food systems to make nutritious diets available to all.

November 10–12, 2014, UNICEF Stop Stunting Conference, India. Link
The Stop Stunting regional conference provided a knowledge-for-action platform where state-of-the-art evidence, better practices, and innovations were shared to accelerate sectoral and cross-sectoral policies, programs, and research in nutrition and sanitation to reduce the prevalence of child stunting in South Asia.

REFERENCE MANUALS

Global Nutrition Report, 2014. International Food Policy Research Institute. Link | WaterAid review of the Global Nutrition Report
The first-ever Global Nutrition Report provides a comprehensive narrative and analysis on the state of the world’s nutrition. The Global Nutrition Report convenes existing processes, highlights progress in combating malnutrition, and identifies gaps and proposes ways to fill them. Through this, the report helps to guide action, build accountability, and spark increased commitment for further progress toward reducing malnutrition much faster.

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene in Nutrition Efforts: A Resource Guide, 2014. WASH Advocates. Link
This resource guide includes manuals, reports, academic studies, and organizations working on WASH and nutrition. The guide can serve as a tool for implementers and advocates in the WASH/Nutrition nexus looking to pursue and promote integrated programming.

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Urban Water Supply and Sanitation in Southeast Asia: A Guide to Good Practice

Urban Water Supply and Sanitation in Southeast Asia: A Guide to Good Practice, 2014.

Arthur C. McIntosh, Asian Development Bank.

Objective – This book provides stakeholders (governments, development partners, utilities, consultants, donors, academe, media, civil society, and nongovernment organizations) with a point of reference and some tools for moving forward effectively and efficiently in the urban water supply and sanitation sector in Southeast Asia. New generations of water professionals should not have to repeat the mistakes of the past. Instead they should be able to take what has been learned so far and move forward. To facilitate this process, this book was designed to improve understanding and awareness of the issues and possible solutions among all stakeholders in the sector.

Scope – This book focuses on six countries in Southeast Asia—Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Philippines, Thailand, and Viet Nam. Field data were obtained from 14 utilities in these six countries. Future studies should bolster the analysis of sanitation, now still regrettably weak for lack of data.

Open Defecation in India by Assa Doron and Robin Jeffrey

Open Defecation in India. EPW Economic & Political Weekly, December 6, 2014 vol xlix no 49

Authors: Assa Doron, Robin Jeffrey

This study identifies 11 issues that have inhibited the spread of a comprehensive sanitation programme. It emphasises the complexity of issues and helps avoid the facile targeting of the poor as deficient citizens, whose latrine practices are viewed as a “primitive” source of social disorder and disease. Recognition that many factors are involved and interrelated might also serve as a warning against patchwork policies that disregard local context in their haste to proclaim another district an “open defecation free zone”.