Category Archives: Hygiene Promotion

WSUP animation – welcome to the world of urban WASH programming!

How do you design and implement an effective urban WASH programme? In WSUP’s recent publication “The Urban Programming Guide” we set out the many activities involved, from planning and capacity building to improving services and promoting behaviour change. This short animation brings the publication to life and takes you on a virtual tour of some of these activities in action: enjoy the ride!

You can download the Urban Programming Guide for free from our website.

WEDC – Managing hygiene promotion in WASH programmes

Managing hygiene promotion in WASH programmes, 2014. WEDC.

Managers of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programmes normally acknowledge that people need to behave in a hygienic manner to protect water supplies and ensure that sanitation facilities are used properly. Hygiene-promotion-3

However, promoting hygienic behaviour differs from the construction of infrastructure, with indicators of progress being less concrete. This means campaigns need to be planned and carried out in a suitable manner.

Contents of this guide
Background
What is hygiene?
Principles of hygiene promotion
Planning a hygiene promotion programme
Participatory tools
Analysis of the data
Implementation of the action plan
Methods of hygiene and sanitation promotion
Selecting and training facilitators
Monitoring and evaluation

Lifebuoy premieres heart-breaking new film about the importance of handwashing

lifebuoy5 June 2014, London – In a follow up to its award-winning film, Gondappa, Unilever’s health soap, Lifebuoy has released a compelling new film, Tree of Life. The aim is to support Lifebuoy’s Help a Child Reach Five campaign and spread the word about the importance of handwashing with soap. The film is the story of a mother’s love, loss and longing after losing her child to a preventable disease such as diarrhoea.

unileverThe film follows a mother’s journey of love, loss and longing through her unique relationship with a tree, that highlights the importance of handwashing with soap. Tree of Life is inspired by folklore and this moving story is used to dramatise Lifebuoy’s Help a Child Reach 5 campaign.

A year ago Lifebuoy adopted Thesgora, a village in India and through its handwashing programmes dramatically improved children’s hand washing habits so that they now washed their hands 2 additional times per day. This year Lifebuoy takes its life saving mission to Bitobe in Indonesia and has created Tree of Life to raise awareness of their important mission.

Every 15 seconds, one child dies from diarrhoea or pneumonia, diseases that are preventable through the simple act of handwashing with soap.  That is 1.7 million children every year. Lifebuoy has taken its handwashing behaviour change programmes to 183 million people across the world, and now it is committed to change the handwashing behaviour of a billion people by 2015. This is part of Unilever’s commitment to help more than one billion people to improve their health and hygiene by 2020 under the Unilever Sustainable Living Plan.

Samir Singh, Global Brand VP, Lifebuoy, “It is unacceptable that 1.7 million children die every year from infectious diseases when we have cost effective lifesaving solutions, such as handwashing with soap, readily available. We wanted to tell the world the Lifebuoy story in a deeply emotional way and turn the Help A Child Reach 5 campaign into something personal and powerful.”

Menstrual hygiene reports from Bolivia, Philippines and Sierra Leone

In 2012, UNICEF and the Center for Global Safe Water at Emory University initiated a programme to support collaborative research focused specifically on exploring the MHM challenges faced by female students in Bolivia, the Philippines, Rwanda and Sierra Leone. The project includes developing or
strengthening MHM-related programming in schools in those countries. WASH_Philippines-6

Emory University sent research fellows to work with UNICEF and its in-country WASH in Schools partners on the programme. The assessment activities conducted and themes explored were guided by an ecological framework that covers societal, environmental, interpersonal, personal and biological factors. Questions for qualitative data collection were created to investigate and understand the personal challenges and needs girls have during menstruation in the school setting.

The results are now published as a series of reports:

Bolivia – Long, Jeanne, Bethany A. Caruso, Diego Lopez, Koenraad Vancraeynest, Murat Sahin, Karen L. Andes and Matthew C. Freeman, ‘WASH in Schools Empowers Girls’ Education in Rural Cochabamba, Bolivia: An assessment of menstrual hygiene management in schools’, United Nations Children’s Fund, New York, November 2013.

Philippines – Jacquelyn, Bethany A. Caruso, Anna Ellis, Murat Sahin, Jonathan Michael Villasenor, Karen L. Andes and Matthew C. Freeman, ‘WASH in Schools Empowers Girls’  Education in Masbate Province and Metro Manila, Philippines: An assessment of menstrual hygiene management in schools’, United Nations Children’s Fund, New York, November 2013.

Sierra Leone – Caruso, Bethany A., Alexandra Fehr, Kazumi Inden, Murat Sahin, Anna Ellis,  Karen L. Andes and Matthew C. Freeman, ‘WASH in Schools Empowers Girls’ Education in Freetown, Sierra Leone: An assessment of menstrual hygiene management in schools’, United Nations Children’s Fund, New York, November 2013.

 

A Handwashing Song by OneRepublics

DFID pledges €28 million to SNV for multi-country sanitation programme

More funding for a local government-led approach introduced in 2008 by SNV and IRC to scale up sanitation from community to district level.

The UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) has awarded SNV Netherlands Development Organisation a €28 million (US$ 32 million) service contract to fund the Sustainable Sanitation & Hygiene for All (SSH4A) Results Programme. Introduced by SNV and IRC in 2008 in Nepal, Bhutan, Cambodia, Viet Nam and Laos, SSH4A is a comprehensive, local government-led approach to scale up sanitation from community to district level.

With funding from the DFID Results Fund, the SSH4A Results Programme will provide improved sanitation to more than 2 million people in nine countries: Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Nepal, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. The programme will also reach out to over 2.7 million people with hygiene promotion, make 1,200 communities Open Defecation Free (ODF), ensure that 400,000 people practice hand washing with soap at critical times, assist the preparation of district sanitation plans and improve local governments’ capacity for steering improved sanitation.

SSH4A diagram

SSH4A programmes have been implemented with rural communities in 15 countries across Asia and Africa. In Asia, more than 2.2 million rural people have been reached, of whom 700,000 received improved sanitation.

More information:

 

SourceSNV, 28 Apr 2014

May 2, 2014 – WASHplus Weekly: Focus on Sanitation

Issue 144 | May 2, 2014 | Focus on Sanitation

This issue features some of the most recent reports, blog posts, and videos on fecal sludge management, community-led total sanitation, sanitation marketing and other sanitation topics. Included are a 2014 UNICEF evaluation of its Community Approaches to Total Sanitation, updated statistics and country reports from the Joint Monitoring Programme, videos from the Toilet Fair in India, and other resources.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Faecal Sludge Management Conference (FSM3), Jan 18-22, 2015, Hanoi, Vietnam, Call for Papers and Workshops(Link)
FSM3 will share research and experience and build upon practical developments since the last FSM2 Conference, which was held in Durban, South Africa, in October 2012. Some of the themes include: FSM as an enterprise—commercial viability, financing arrangements, and cost recovery—desludging, collection, and transportation; FS characterization and technologies; and pit emptying operations and maintenance.

REPORTS

2014 Updates from the UNICEF/WHO Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) for Water Supply and Sanitation. UNICEF; WHO. (Link)
The latest JMP estimates are now available and include 2014 country files, the latest statistical table, and a 2014 snapshot. washplusweekly

Anaerobic Digestion of Biowaste in Developing Countries: Practical Information and Case Studies, 2014. Y Vögeli, Eawag—Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology. (Link)
This book aims to compile existing and recently generated knowledge on issues of anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste at small and medium-scale with special consideration of low- and middle-income country conditions. The book is divided into two parts: Part 1 focuses on practical information related to anaerobic digestion and biogas production, and Part 2 presents selected case studies from around the world.

Downstream of the Toilet: Transforming Poo into Profit, 2013. WASHplus. (Link)
WASHplus engaged the NGO Practica to design and pilot a private-sector service delivery model to sustainably manage fecal sludge generated in Ambositra, Madagascar, using low-cost decentralized technologies. Working closely with the commune authorities, the project selected and trained a local entrepreneur, developed a sludge burial site, experimented with a range of manual extraction methods and tools, and engaged in a social marketing campaign to promote the service.

Evaluation of the WASH Sector Strategy “Community Approaches to Total Sanitation” (CATS): Final Evaluation Report, 2014. UNICEF. (Link)
In the context of the recent evolution of the sanitation sector, CATS can be seen in two ways: as a move from technically based supply-driven approaches toward behavior change, demand-driven approaches, and also as a recognition that a new social norm around ending open defecation is a key issue to be addressed because of its impacts on and linkages with other sectors (health, education, etc.). CATS successfully contributed to shifting the sanitation sector toward demand-driven rather than directly subsidized approaches. The evaluation shows that CATS has given a new momentum to rural sanitation in the more than 50 countries supported by UNICEF. This new momentum has translated into a change in how rural communities regard sanitation, invest in it, commit to new behaviors around ending open defecation—and eventually improve their living conditions.

Continue reading

#Cricket4WASH: sanitation & hygiene promoted at major global sports event

Photo: WASH United

Photo: WASH United

Handwashing and menstrual hygiene were promoted at a major global sports event, thanks to a partnership between WASH United and the International Cricket Council (ICC).

WASH United raked in Indian cricket superstar Suresh Raina to become their brand ambassador at the ICC World Twenty20 Cricket World Cup, which was held from 16 March to 6 April, 2014, in Bangladesh.

 Suresh Raina and tournament mascot Happy the Hand-washing Tige

Suresh Raina and tournament mascot Happy the Hand-washing Tiger vow to “bowl ou diarrhoea”. Photo: WASH United

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Two Indian sanitation social ventures receive US$ 50K in funding

A sanitary pad manufacturer and a human waste management company are among the nine winners of the Artha Venture Challenge (AVC) 2013. All of them will receive up to US$ 50,000 (INR 3 million) in funding from the Artha Platform subject to due diligence and investment approval.

Anandi sanitation pad

Photo: Aakar Innovations

Award winner Aakar Innovations is a Delhi-based start-up that supplies raw materials and sanitary pad mini-factories to women’s groups in rural areas. Costing US$ 5,000, each mini-factory can produce 1500-2000 pads per day, which is enough to provide work to 10-30 women. The biodegradable Anandi pads are  made from agri-waste. One pack of 8 pads sells for 20 rupees (US$ 0.33), said to be 40% less than branded mass-market products.

Banka BioLoo is a women led business from Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, providing sustainable solutions for sanitation and wastewater managment based on biotechnology. It manufactures, supplies and installs biodigesters for on-site treatment of human waste.

The Artha Venture Challenge (AVC) is funded by the Artha Platform and its founding organisation Rianta Philanthropy Ltd.  AVC 2013 was inspired by the UK Big Venture Challenge run by UnLtd UK.

The Artha Platform is a members-only online community and network linking impact investors/donors, social entrepreneurs and capacity building support organisations working on or in India.

Source:

  • Anand Rai, A look at the 9 social ventures that will each receive $50K in funding as part of the Artha Venture Challenge 2013, techcircle.in, 11 Apr 2014
  • Cut from a different cloth, Economist, 14 Sep 2013

THE URBAN PROGRAMMING GUIDE: How to design and implement a pro-poor urban WASH programme

Improving water, sanitation and hygiene services to low-income urban areas is a highly challenging and complex task. Traditional approaches have often failed to work. We need new approaches and fresh thinking. We need governments, donors and sector professionals genuinely committed to improving services in slum settlements. It’s challenging but it can be done! This guide offers some solutions based around WSUP’s experience: all you have to do is put them into practice!

The guide provides an introduction to urban WASH programming: how to design and implement a pro-poor urban water, sanitation and hygiene programme.

Urban Programming Guide
Who is this guide for?
This guide is primarily designed for WASH professionals working in governments, development agencies, funding agencies or civil society organisations. It will also be useful for professionals working for service providers including water utilities, local authorities and in the private sector.

How to use this guide
The guide provides an overview of some key strategies and service delivery models. It’s not intended to be encyclopaedic: it’s a rapid-reference document with the following intended uses:

  • To aid the planning, design and implementation of urban WASH programmes.
  • To assist with investment planning by service providers.
  • To point the reader towards further sources of information and guidance.

The guide is free to download from WSUP’s website: http://www.wsup.com/resource/the-urban-programming-guide