Category Archives: Wastewater Management

#CleanUpIndia: #Sanitation “All Stars” discuss plans to make India #opendefecation free

Prime Minister Narendra Modi has taken up sanitation as a special cause. He would like to celebrate Mahatma Gandhi’s 150th birth anniversary in 2019 by declaring India open defecation free. A noble goal, but is it realistic? The political will and financial commitment is there but can the shift in mindset from building infrastructure to behaviour change and ensuring toilet use and safe disposal be made?

As part of its #CleanUpIndia initiative, TV channel CNN – Indian Broadcasting Network (CNN – IBN) invited an “all star” cast of sanitation celebrities to discuss the Swach Bharat or Clean India campaign that Modi intends to launch in October 2014. What do they think needs to be done to clean up India for good?

In the line up are:

and invited guests:

Free online course on urban sanitation starts 13 October

A team of instructors led by Christoph Lüthi from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) are eager to teach you how to plan urban sanitation systems.

Together with Sandec/Eawag, EPFL has designed a 5 week online course introducing sector planning tools and frameworks such as Sanitation 21, Community-Led Urban Environmental Sanitation (CLUES) and the Sanitation Systems Approach.

The course consists of lecture videos (English, with French subtitles), practical exercises, a homework quiz and a final exam. The questions and explanations for the practical exercises, the homework quiz and the final exam are offered in English and French. Watch the introduction video.

The course “Planning & Design of Sanitation Systems and Technologies” runs from 13 October to 16 November 2014.

It is the 2nd MOOC (massive open online course) of the series on “WASH in developing countries”. The first MOOC was on “Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage“.

India: Big push for small cities

By Prakhar Jain (email) and Aditya Bhol

The run-up to elect a new government brought sanitation to the fore of public conversation in India. Last month, Prime Minister Modi declared sanitation as a national priority, announcing ‘Swachh Bharat Abhiyan’, a sanitation programme dedicated to creating clean India by 2019 as a tribute to Mahatma Gandhi’s 150th birth anniversary. Whether or not this plan succeeds may depend on whether it is simply a repackaged programme such as the ‘Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan’ that was focused entirely on building toilets in rural India, or a renewed commitment to improve sanitation in both the rural and urban areas.  As India urbanizes, demand for effective and sustainable sanitation services will increase. India, with 11% of the world’s urban population currently, accounts for 46% of global urban open defecation [i]. While other developing countries like China, Vietnam, and Peru have already achieved open defecation free (ODF) status in urban areas, India still lags behind. The situation is particularly abysmal in small cities (population below a million) where close to 17% of the population defecates in the open as compared to 4% in large cities (population greater than a million) [ii]. The 2011 national census has shown that these small cities represent more than 91% of total urban open defecation in the country. If we are to catch up, the key is to immediately turn our attention towards small and medium-sized cities.

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Reality of urban sanitation in Bangladesh

SNV has produced a short video on the harsh reality of current urban sanitation practices in Bangladesh. Of course they want to change this. That is at least the intention of SNV’s recently launched “Modernising urban sanitation in Southern Bangladesh” project focussing on market-based solutions.

The business case for Base of the Pyramid sanitation

Ready for Funding: Innovative  sanitation businesses cover

The Sanitation Business Matchmaking Estafetta initiative has published a guide to business opportunities for sanitation in small towns and peri-urban areas in upcoming economies.

The sanitation sector offers long term, slow and stable return on investments and this can be a pearl in your portfolio. Moreover, sanitation services create social benefits which may be of interest for impact investors. The challenge of the sanitation industry is to access to the  right blend of financial products. Investors are invited to guide the sanitation industry in creating the conditions needed to realize ventures that prove to be attractive investment opportunities.

The guide targets investors, intermediaries and the private sector. It covers both household and public sanitation, as well as emptying & collection services, smart small sewerage, and treatment & reuse. Using Ghana as a case study, the guide presents a market analysis for sanitation investment opportunities for each of the before mentioned sanitation components and services.

Download Ready for Funding: Innovative sanitation businesses

May 2, 2014 – WASHplus Weekly: Focus on Sanitation

Issue 144 | May 2, 2014 | Focus on Sanitation

This issue features some of the most recent reports, blog posts, and videos on fecal sludge management, community-led total sanitation, sanitation marketing and other sanitation topics. Included are a 2014 UNICEF evaluation of its Community Approaches to Total Sanitation, updated statistics and country reports from the Joint Monitoring Programme, videos from the Toilet Fair in India, and other resources.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Faecal Sludge Management Conference (FSM3), Jan 18-22, 2015, Hanoi, Vietnam, Call for Papers and Workshops(Link)
FSM3 will share research and experience and build upon practical developments since the last FSM2 Conference, which was held in Durban, South Africa, in October 2012. Some of the themes include: FSM as an enterprise—commercial viability, financing arrangements, and cost recovery—desludging, collection, and transportation; FS characterization and technologies; and pit emptying operations and maintenance.

REPORTS

2014 Updates from the UNICEF/WHO Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) for Water Supply and Sanitation. UNICEF; WHO. (Link)
The latest JMP estimates are now available and include 2014 country files, the latest statistical table, and a 2014 snapshot. washplusweekly

Anaerobic Digestion of Biowaste in Developing Countries: Practical Information and Case Studies, 2014. Y Vögeli, Eawag—Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology. (Link)
This book aims to compile existing and recently generated knowledge on issues of anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste at small and medium-scale with special consideration of low- and middle-income country conditions. The book is divided into two parts: Part 1 focuses on practical information related to anaerobic digestion and biogas production, and Part 2 presents selected case studies from around the world.

Downstream of the Toilet: Transforming Poo into Profit, 2013. WASHplus. (Link)
WASHplus engaged the NGO Practica to design and pilot a private-sector service delivery model to sustainably manage fecal sludge generated in Ambositra, Madagascar, using low-cost decentralized technologies. Working closely with the commune authorities, the project selected and trained a local entrepreneur, developed a sludge burial site, experimented with a range of manual extraction methods and tools, and engaged in a social marketing campaign to promote the service.

Evaluation of the WASH Sector Strategy “Community Approaches to Total Sanitation” (CATS): Final Evaluation Report, 2014. UNICEF. (Link)
In the context of the recent evolution of the sanitation sector, CATS can be seen in two ways: as a move from technically based supply-driven approaches toward behavior change, demand-driven approaches, and also as a recognition that a new social norm around ending open defecation is a key issue to be addressed because of its impacts on and linkages with other sectors (health, education, etc.). CATS successfully contributed to shifting the sanitation sector toward demand-driven rather than directly subsidized approaches. The evaluation shows that CATS has given a new momentum to rural sanitation in the more than 50 countries supported by UNICEF. This new momentum has translated into a change in how rural communities regard sanitation, invest in it, commit to new behaviors around ending open defecation—and eventually improve their living conditions.

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Faecal Sludge Management short course

In 2014 and 2015 UNESCO-IHE is offering a 3-week course on Faecal Sludge Management.

This course is designed for sanitary, civil / wastewater and environmental engineers. It will introduce findings from the ongoing research from the Pro-Poor Sanitation Innovations project funded by the Gates Foundation.

Topics include:

  • Public Health and sanitation
  • Excreta Characterisation
  • Faecal Sludge Systems
  • Non-Technical Aspects of FSM
  • Specific circumstances (emergency sanitation, urban poor)

Dates:

  • 30 June – 18 July 2014,  application: 30 May 2014, fee: € 2700
  •  29 June – 17 July 2015,  application: 29 May 2015, fee: € 2775

Applications and more information:
www.unesco-ihe.org/faecal-sludge-management