Category Archives: Africa

Benin – Behaviour change, a must for improved sanitation

Benin – Behaviour change, a must for improved sanitation | Source/complete article:  Edmund Smith-Asante | Graphic.com – 21 February 2014

Excerpts - Benin’s Minister of Health, Professor Dorothéme Kinde Gazard, has called on African nations to lay emphasis on behaviour change communication, as it is the surest way to achieve improved sanitation.

Disclosing that 87 per cent of Africans were still engaged in open defecation, while only three out of 10 people washed their hands with soap, she stated, “So the challenge is also on behaviour change.”

Some of the participants at the Benin workshop.

Some of the participants at the Benin workshop.

The Health Minister therefore urged African countries to strike a balance between change in behaviour and the provision of sanitation facilities.

Governments’ Commitments to WASH

Professor Dorothéme Gazard made the statements when she addressed the opening of a three-day regional workshop on “Advocacy, Communications and Monitoring of [water, sanitation and hygiene] WASH Commitments” for selected journalists, in Cotonou on Tuesday.

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Can you imagine not being able to go to school because you’re on your period?

Can you imagine not being able to go to school because you’re on your period? | Source/complete article: Women24, Feb 10, 2014.

Excerpt - Sue Barnes’ Project Dignity allows girls and young women in townships and rural areas to keep attending school while they’re menstruating. 

Sue Barnes displays the Subz panty pack she has designed for girls who cannot afford sanitary products. Picture: Marilyn Bernard

Sue Barnes displays the Subz panty pack she has designed for girls who cannot afford sanitary products. Picture: Marilyn Bernard

Sue Barnes, founder of Project Dignity, a remarkable initiative for South African school girls, has been recognised as the 2013 Clarins Most Dynamic Woman of the Year.

Barnes, from Cowies Hill in KwaZulu-Natal, founded the project after she learned how many girls in poor communities skip school while they menstruate.

Lacking money to buy sanitary products, many South African school girls don’t attend class during menstruation.

They also put themselves at risk of infection by using unhygienic alternatives to sanitary pads, such as newspaper or even sand and leaves. As a result, millions of girls miss up to a quarter of their school days.

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International conference on public services in the global South

Protesters  in Cape Town, June 2013, demanding better service delivery

Protesters in Cape Town, June 2013, demanding better service delivery. Photo: yazkam.wordpress.com

Cape Town, the city where “poo has become a politcial issue“, is hosting an international conference on “Putting Public in Public Services: Research, Action and Equity in the Global South” from 13-16 April  2014 .

Organised by the Municipal Services Project, the conference  brings together researchers, activists, labour representatives, development practitioners and policy makers from around the world working to promote progressive public services,  including water and sanitation.

The following presentations focus specifically on sanitation:

  • Dieter Wartchow (Brazil) – National sanitation laws in Brazil: An opportunity lost?
  • Melanie Samson (South Africa) – Including the informal, transforming the public: Insights from innovations in the waste sector
  • Federico Parra (Colombia) – Recognition of the ‘recicladores’ as public managers of waste in Colombia
  • Poornima Chikarmane (India) – Of users, providers and the state: Solid waste management in Pune, India
  • Mary Galvin (South Africa) – Dealing with shit in sub-Sahara Africa: The impact of “new” approaches to sanitation on human rights
  • Julieta del Valle (Argentina) – Guaranteeing access to public water and sanitation: ‘Acompañamiento social’ in Buenos Aires

Read more in the full programme.

Registration is free for observers but priority wil be given to people with a demonstrated interest in conference themes.

Registration deadline: 14 March 2014

Those unable to attend can follow debates via video streaming, podcasts and social media.

Conference websitemunicipalservicesproject.org/about-conference

Seminar on monitoring of decentralised WASH services in West Africa

This is a bilingual seminar on Monitoring the decentralised delivery of WASH services in rural areas and small towns in West Africa in Ouagagoudou, Burkina Faso organised by IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre and pS-Eau.

Date: 07 – 09 April 2014

Designed in priority for stakeholders working in collaboration with local governments, this seminar will be an opportunity to share experiences in the field of monitoring WASH services at local level in West Africa.

The seminar will be structured around four themes:

  1. Monitoring and evaluation to support local governments’ water and sanitation strategic planning
  2. Monitoring and evaluation to improve water, sanitation and hygiene services
  3. Monitoring and evaluation to manage water and sanitation services
  4. Monitoring and evaluation to regulate water and sanitation services

but related topics are also of interest to the organisers.

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 17 February 2014

More information: www.irc.nl/page/82341

How to Trigger for Handwashing with Soap

How to Trigger for Handwashing with Soap.  Frontiers of CLTS:  Innovations and Insights, Issue 02, January 2014.

Author: Jolly Ann Maulit for UNICEF Malawi Frontiers

The Open Defecation Free (ODF) Malawi 2015 Strategy and National Hand Washing Campaign have been contributing to an increased focus on handwashing with soap (HWWS) in Malawi. This is a very positive development!

Some studies estimate that washing hands with soap can reduce diarrhoeal disease rates by up to 50 per cent and respiratory disease rates by up to 25 per cent. This makes handwashing with soap one of the most cost-effective interventions for reducing illness and preventable deaths among children in Malawi. It is therefore quite worthwhile for us to be working together to increase handwashing practices.

Since Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) is our key intervention for sanitation and hygiene promotion in Malawi, it provides an excellent opportunity to facilitate handwashing behaviour change. However, up till now, the ‘triggering tools’ for achieving HWWS behaviour change from CLTS have not been well known by implementers in Malawi. The purpose of this document is to outline several practical tools which can be used as a part of CLTS in order to trigger realisation among communities of the importance of handwashing with soap, as well as eliminating open defecation.

 

 

 

Global Sanitation Fund in Malawi

Global Sanitation Fund in Malawi, by Rochelle Holm, Ph.D., PMP, Mzuzu University, Centre of Excellence in Water and Sanitation and SMART Centre Manager. Email: rochelledh@hotmail.com.
The Global Sanitation Fund programme in Malawi is aimed at implementing sanitation and hygiene initiatives that will help the Government of Malawi to attain its vision of ensuring Sanitation for All in the country and its mission of ensuring that all Malawians access improved sanitation facilities, practice safe hygiene and re-use or recycle waste for the sustainable management of the environment and socio-economic development.  gsf-malawi
The programme will help in reducing Malawi’s open defecation which the JMP 2013 Update (World Health Organization and UNICEF) estimates to stand at 7% in 2011. This reduction in open defecation will be achieved through:
  • triggering 3,600 villages and 274 schools in the six districts using Community Led Total Sanitation and School Led Total Sanitation approaches, respectively, and promoting the adoption of improved sanitation and hygiene practices;
  • conducting sanitation marketing in support of the triggering;
  • developing the capacity of government, civil society organizations and private sector actors in hygiene and sanitation promotion;
  • supporting the planning and implementation of sanitation and hygiene activities at district level;
  • documenting lessons learnt to help improve programming in sanitation and hygiene.

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Microfinance as a potential cataylst for improved sanitation

. Summary of sanitation lending and product delivery models. Water for People

. Summary of sanitation lending and product delivery models. Water for People

Microfinance allows middle- and lower-income households to invest in desirable sanitation products, so that public funding can be freed up to reach the poorest, according to Water for People (WfP). In a new report [1], WfP reviews their experiences in piloting various lending models in seven countries: Bolivia, Guatemala, India, Malawi, Peru, Rwanda and Uganda.

The report provides lessons and recommendations for donors wishing to engage in sanitation microfinancing. The four key recommendations are:

  1. Think like a business
  2. Support lending institutions based on the microfinance climate and capacity needs
  3. Build an autonomous sanitation microfinance market
  4. Track progress and lessons

The report is part of WfP’s Sanitation as a Business (SaaB) program, funded by a Gates Foundation grant.

Read the full report

[1]  Chatterley, C. et al, 2013. Microfinance as a potential catalyst for improved sanitation : a synthesis of Water For People’s sanitation lending experiences in seven countries. Denver, CO,USA: Water For People. Available at: <http://www.waterforpeople.org/assets/files/sanitation-microfinance.pdf>

Source: Christie Chatterley et al., Microfinance as a potential cataylst for improved sanitation, Water for People, 27 Dec 2013

Oxfam – Proposals to design, develop sanitation system for flood areas

Oxfam America – International call for Proposals to design and develop an innovative sanitation technology system for flood and flood-prone areas by firms or companies.

Background – Oxfam America is an international NGO, and member of the Oxfam International confederation which operates in more than 90 countries throughout the world working on both development and humanitarian projects. It is one of the leading humanitarian organizations in the field of water, sanitation and public health.

OXFAM America has recently received a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation as part of the project entitled “Improving sanitation conditions for the most vulnerable households in the flooded and flood-prone areas of Pikine and Guediawaye, Dakar, Senegal“.

The call for tenders is initiated on December 16th ,2013 for a 45 day term. Therefore, the deadline for submitting proposals is January 30th , 2014 at 12.00.

Improved Sanitation and Its Impact on Children: An Exploration of Sanergy

Improved Sanitation and Its Impact on Children: An Exploration of Sanergy. Impact Case Study No. 2, 2013.

Esper, H., London, T., and Kanchwala, Y. The William Davidson Institute.

We explore the impacts that Sanergy, a venture providing sanitation facilities and franchising opportunities to the BoP, has on children age eight and under and on pregnant women from the BoP. Sanergy designs and builds 250 USD modular sanitation facilities, called Fresh Life Toilets (FLTs), and sells them to local entrepreneurs for 50,000 Kenyan shillings (KES) or about 588 USD in the Mukuru slum of Nairobi, Kenya. Franchisees receive business management and operations training from Sanergy and earn revenues by charging customers 3-5 KES (0.04-0.06 USD) per use.

We found that Sanergy has the greatest impact on its customers’ children. Sanergy also has substantial impacts on children of franchisees and children in the broader community. The majority of impacts that occur on franchisees’ children are the same as those that occur on customers’ children. In addition, franchisees’ children benefit from the income their parents receive from owning the toilets. However, if parents take out loans to purchase the franchise, their ability to provide for their children may be reduced during the loan repayment period. Franchisees’ children are likely to have greater health benefits from using the toilets, since they are able to use them for free and as often as required, as these are located right outside their homes. Although franchisees’ children will have greater health benefits at an individual level, at an aggregate level, customers’ children will have larger health benefits since the number of franchisees’ children will always be less than the number of customers’ children.

Children living in the community surrounding the FLTs (non-customer children), experience many of the same health benefits as customer’s children as a result of improved cleanliness of the nearby environment. As more people use FLTs, a reduced amount of human waste is found on the ground, resulting in better health outcomes for children. People also begin to have an increased sense of respect for their environment. It is important to note that despite these health benefits, children are still at risk of contracting sanitation-related diseases from exposure to polluted water and other contaminated sources. The impacts we observed on the children of Sanergy’s stakeholders varied within and between the age categories of 0-5 and 6-8 years. We expect that children ages 0-5 receive greater health benefits, as they are more likely to be exposed to contaminants from crawling and playing on the ground and have more vulnerable immune-systems.

Based on the likely outcomes Sanergy has on children across its value chain, we identify opportunities that Sanergy can explore to enhance, deepen, and expand its impacts on children age eight and under and on pregnant women.

USAID – Freshwater Conservation and Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Integration Guidelines

Freshwater Conservation and Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Integration Guidelines: A Framework for Implementation in sub-Saharan Africa, 2013.

Janet Edmond, et al.  Africa Biodiversity  Collaborative Group, Conservation International, and The Nature Conservancy.

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to health, development, and conservation professionals in sub-Saharan Africa on how to plan, coordinate, develop, and achieve mutually supported WASH and freshwater conservation outcomes. It was designed to provide an overall framework to consider when working across sectors.

A set of core guiding principles are included as critical elements to considerbefore developing and implementing integrated projects:

  • WASH projects should protect or enhance ecosystem health and water-related ecosystem services, such as sustainable water quantity and quality
  • Conservation projects should incorporate/consider WASH goals that provide social/environmental benefits in conjunction with conservation goals.
  • WASH and conservation programs should promote resilience to future changes in water use, availability, and climate patterns through adaptive management of both natural and built infrastructure.