Category Archives: Resources

Grand Challenge: Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is launching a new Grand Challenge: Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development. This challenge focuses on how to effectively reach and empower the most vulnerable women and girls to improve health and development – including economic – outcomes as well as gender equality.

Women_girls_350x233

Gender inequalities and the marginalization of the needs, roles and potential of women and girls are key factors limiting advances in development outcomes for all – women, men, boys, girls and their communities and societies around the world. Moreover, strong associations have been identified between addressing inequalities and enhancing women and girls’ empowerment and agency, and improved development outcomes across sectors, ranging from maternal, newborn, and child health and nutrition to agriculture, water, sanitation, hygiene and financial services for the poor.

The ultimate goal of this challenge is to accelerate discovery of how to most effectively and intentionally identify and address gender inequalities and how this relates to sectoral outcomes; scale-up approaches known to work, in context-relevant ways; and do more to develop better measures of the impact of approaches to enhance women’s and girls’ empowerment and agency. Intentional efforts and strategies are required so that development can contribute more to gender equality and gender equality can contribute more to development.

Grants will go to investigators in low- and middle-income countries, but we encourage partnerships with investigators in other countries, especially where the opportunity exists to build on existing collaborations.

Dec 15, 2014 – Launch of study on WASH and maternal/newborn health

Invitation to attend the
Launch of the PLOS Medicine paper
From joint thinking to joint action: A call to action on improving water, sanitation and hygiene for maternal and newborn health
and a discussion on how water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) can accelerate progress on maternal and newborn health

  • on the 15th of December 2014 at 5:00 – 6:00 PM
  • at the John Snow Lecture Theatre,
  • and followed by a reception until 7:00 PM,
  • at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT.

We are delighted to invite you to attend the launch of an important new paper published by PLOS Medicine. This paper, authored by scientists and technical experts from leading universities and international agencies, outlines the importance of WASH for maternal and neonatal health outcomes. lshtm

The event will be chaired by Oliver Cumming (LSHTM) and speakers will include:

  • Ms Jane Edmondson (Head of Human Development, UK DFID)
  • Dr Maria Neira (Director of Public Health and Environment, WHO)
  • Professor Oona Campbell (LSHTM)
  • Professor Wendy Graham (University of Aberdeen, & SoapBox)
  • Dr Paul Simpson (Deputy Editor, PLOS Medicine)
  • Ms Yael Velleman (Senior Policy Analyst, WaterAid)

To attend, please kindly register at https://plos-medicine.eventbrite.co.uk. Seating is limited, so we would request that you register as soon as possible (free of charge).

New business-led coalition for market-based sanitation for the poor

Toilet Board Coalition logoOn World Toilet Day, Unilever announced the launch of The Toilet Board Coalition. The aim of the new coalition is to tackle  open defecation using market-driven solutions.

The Toilet Board Coalition brings together some of the most forward-thinking organisations in the sanitation space: Firmenich, Kimberly-Clark, LIXIL Corporation and Unilever represent the business sector; Dr Val Curtis of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Barbara Evans of the University of Leeds bring academic rigour to the table; and a number of development sector and governmental bodies bring their one-of-a-kind resources and specialist knowledge: Agence Française De Développement; the Asian Development Bank; the UK’s Department for International Development; Stone Family Foundation; WaterAid; Water and Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP); Water Supply & Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC); the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Programme; the World Toilet Organization; Water and Sanitation for Africa; and UNICEF.

Toilet Board Coalition publications

Toilet Board Coalition publications

Continue reading

Innovation in Urban Sanitation: FaME and U-ACT Research in Sub-Saharan Africa

In Sub-Saharan Africa sanitation needs of the majority of the urban population are met by onsite sanitation technologies such as pit latrines. As part of the SPLASH sanitation research programme the FaME (Faecal Management Enterprises) and U-ACT Project researched innovative solutions to increase access to sustainable sanitation services. Building on this research Sandec/Eawag  has recently started the SEEK Project (Sludge to Energy Enterprises) researching co-processing of faecal sludge and other urban waste streams into fuel pellets and with these electricity through gasification.

World Toilet Day: cities can’t wait

On World Toilet Day, IRC presents its ideas how to ‘systemically change sanitation in cities’. A new working paper marks one of the first steps in finding answers on how to reform a sanitation sector, which is failing a large part of the urban population.

Convergence of human and solid waste in a stormwater drain in Mumbai, India (Photo by Giacomo Galli/ IRC).

Convergence of human and solid waste in a stormwater drain in Mumbai, India (Photo by Giacomo Galli/ IRC).

While more people in cities have access to toilets than in villages, both wastewater and solid waste remains largely untreated. Take Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh: 99 percent of the population use toilets but according to Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) a staggering 98 percent of their waste is dumped untreated in the enviroment [1].

On World Toilet Day, IRC presents its ideas how to tackle sanitation in cities. A new working paper “Towards Systemic Change in Urban Sanitation“, marks one of the first steps in finding answers on how to reform a sanitation sector, which is failing a large part of the urban population. The problems in urban sanitation range from lack of facilities to lack of public funding and messy politics in urban governance.The root causes are systemic and technology alone is not the solution.

Continue reading

Celebrating Cambodia’s progress in rural sanitation: iDE video

iDE congratulates the people of Cambodia in a new video:

“Cambodia: Growing Momentum for Sanitation”

The great progress in rural sanitation is something for Cambodia to be proud of.”
—Chreay Pom, Director, Department of Rural Health at Ministry of Rural Development

The rate at which sanitary toilets are being installed in rural Cambodia has increased dramatically since the Government of Cambodia made rural sanitation a priority in 2008. In the past six years, hundreds of thousands of rural families are experiencing the benefits of improved sanitation for the first time. This video celebrates Cambodia’s progress in sanitation and highlights the people who have made it possible—government officials, local business people and rural families.

“In 2008, the government set sanitation as a priority in order to improve people’s standard of living. Since then, we’ve noticed a huge change in rural communities. People have latrines at home and they understand what good sanitation is, and actually practice it within their families.” —Dr. Chea Samnang, WSSCC National Coordinator

Many national and international organizations have also contributed to the sanitation movement happening in Cambodia. One of these organizations is iDE. iDE is dedicated to outsmarting diarrheal disease by making sure that quality toilets are accessible through local markets at an affordable price.

“…We are helping the private sector learn what people want and helping them produce and sell it at an affordable price. The last few years have been a turning point across the country, with annual toilet sales increasing four-fold since 2008.” —iDE

iDE’s three-year Sanitation Marketing Scale-Up (SMSU) project is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Stone Family Foundation, and technically supported by the Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) of the World Bank. The project is supported by the Ministry of Rural Development.

iDE is an international non-profit organization dedicated to creating income and livelihood opportunities for the rural poor. In addition to worldwide programs in agriculture, iDE implements programs in Africa and Asia in the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector. iDE’s WASH programs focus on creating markets around aspirational and effective WASH products and services that reduce diarrheal disease among poor households. iDE has impacted more than 23 million people globally to date through its WASH and agriculture interventions.

ideorg.org

5th International Dry Toilet Conference: call for papers

DT 2015 – Dry Toilet Conference logoThe Global Dry Toilet Association of Finland will organize the 5th International Dry Toilet Conference (DT2015) in Tampere, Finland, in the Tampere University of Applied Sciences on 19th – 22nd of August 2015.

The main theme for DT2015 will be solutions, which will be reflected in all the presentations. The aim of the conference is to discuss concrete ideas and solutions through sessions and workshops, covering topics from ecological sanitation and nutrient cycling to dry toilet technologies and use of excreta as a fertilizer.

You can find the call for papers and register here: http://www.huussi.net/en/activities/dt-2015/