Category Archives: Education & training

WSUP animation – welcome to the world of urban WASH programming!

How do you design and implement an effective urban WASH programme? In WSUP’s recent publication “The Urban Programming Guide” we set out the many activities involved, from planning and capacity building to improving services and promoting behaviour change. This short animation brings the publication to life and takes you on a virtual tour of some of these activities in action: enjoy the ride!

You can download the Urban Programming Guide for free from our website.

Faecal Sludge Management short course

In 2014 and 2015 UNESCO-IHE is offering a 3-week course on Faecal Sludge Management.

This course is designed for sanitary, civil / wastewater and environmental engineers. It will introduce findings from the ongoing research from the Pro-Poor Sanitation Innovations project funded by the Gates Foundation.

Topics include:

  • Public Health and sanitation
  • Excreta Characterisation
  • Faecal Sludge Systems
  • Non-Technical Aspects of FSM
  • Specific circumstances (emergency sanitation, urban poor)

Dates:

  • 30 June – 18 July 2014,  application: 30 May 2014, fee: € 2700
  •  29 June - 17 July 2015,  application: 29 May 2015, fee: € 2775

Applications and more information:
www.unesco-ihe.org/faecal-sludge-management

#Cricket4WASH: sanitation & hygiene promoted at major global sports event

Photo: WASH United

Photo: WASH United

Handwashing and menstrual hygiene were promoted at a major global sports event, thanks to a partnership between WASH United and the International Cricket Council (ICC).

WASH United raked in Indian cricket superstar Suresh Raina to become their brand ambassador at the ICC World Twenty20 Cricket World Cup, which was held from 16 March to 6 April, 2014, in Bangladesh.

 Suresh Raina and tournament mascot Happy the Hand-washing Tige

Suresh Raina and tournament mascot Happy the Hand-washing Tiger vow to “bowl ou diarrhoea”. Photo: WASH United

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29 April 2014 – SuSanA/SEI webinar on “Adding missing links in sanitation value chains” with BMGF grantees

The Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) with assistance of a team led by Stockholm Environment Institute is inviting you to the 7th webinar with Gates Foundation sanitation grantees.

  • Topic of the webinar is “Adding missing links in sanitation value chains”
  • Date/Time: Tuesday 29 April 2014, 16:30 – 17:15 (CET – Central European Time; use this time converter to find your local time)
  • Agenda: 16:00 Set-up of connections (you can start entering the virtual meeting room) – 16:30 recording starts – three presentations; each presentation is about 5 minutes long and is followed by around 10 minutes of questions – 17:15 end of webinar.
  • The virtual meeting room can accommodate up to 100 participantsAttendance at this webinar is open to all.
  • Once recorded, the webinar will be put online on the SuSanA Youtube channel in this Playlist together with previous webinars.

Three grantees of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will present their research results:

reyes1 – Is a power auger “Excrevator” a suitable tool to empty pit latrines in South Africa and septic tanks in India? By Francis de los Reyes (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA)
Previous discussion about this research on the forum

 

yeh2 – A compact water recycling and energy harvesting system for off-grid public toilets in low-income urban areas: The NEWgeneratorTM anaerobic membrane bioreactor ready for field testing in India. By Daniel Yeh (University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA)
Previous discussion about this research on the forum.

herzon3 – Community-scale facility to process faeces and faecal sludge into safe biochar by pyrolysis – field testing this year with Sanergy in Nairobi. By Brian von Herzen and Laura Talsma (Climate Foundation, California, USA)
Previous discussion about this research on the forum.

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12 March – SuSanA​​–WASHtech webinar on Technology Applicability Framework (TAF)

SuSanA

12 March -16h00 : SuSanA​​–WASHtech webinar on Technology Applicability Framework (TAF)

SuSanA secretariat and WASHtech invites you to participate in a webinar that will present and discuss the Technology Applicability Framework (TAF) developed during the WASHtech project: www.washtechnologies.net

When: 16h00 CET on 12th March 2014 (Time converter: www.worldtimebuddy.com/)

Webinar outline:

15h30- Webinar room open
16h00- Welcome by Trevor Surridge (SuSanA secretariat)
16h05- Introduction to TAF by André Olschewski (Skat Foundation)
16h15- Questions on André’s presentation
16h20- Experiences using TAF in Ghana by Benedict Tuffuor (TREND)
16h30- Questions on Benedict’s presentation
16h35- WaterAid’s experience adapting and applying the TAF to a pour-flush toilet option in the Nicaraguan Caribbean by Joshua Briemberg (WaterAid)
16h45- Questions on Joshua presentation leading into an open Q&A session
16h59- Closing and wrap-up from Trevor
17h00- End of Webinar

Webinar Chair: Trevor Surridge (SuSanA secretariat)
Moderation Support: Sean Furey (Skat Foundation)

To participate you need to register:
To register send an email to ruralwater@skat.ch and clearly state “TAF webinar” in the subject and you will be sent an invitation link to the Webinar.

Technical requirements:
For the technical requirements for WebEx:

If you have any questions about the webinar post them in reply to this post or email them to info@susana.org.

AMCOW training consultancy on sanitation & hygiene policy development

The African Ministers’ Council on Water (AMCOW) needs the services of a training service provider to carry out a sanitation and hygiene policy training.  Focal persons in Burundi, Chad, Sierra Leone and Zimbabwe need to be brought up to speed on drawing up plans and strategies .

The aim of this small (20 days) but interesting assignment is to:

train the focal countries on the process of developing a policy document and costed implementation plans and strategies for ending open defecation in those countries, and how to operationalise them.

The assignment supports a US$ 2 million Gates Foundation funded policy and advocacy project being implemented by AMCOW .

Closing date for receipt of applications is March 7, 2014.

Read the full Terms of Reference.

Please do not submit applications or requests for information to Sanitation Updates.

Online Course “Governance in Urban Sanitation”

The Local Development Programme of the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR)  announces the next session of the e-learning course Governance in Urban Sanitation, to be conducted from 23 September to 29 November 2013.

The course aims to enhance the capacity of local decision-makers and sanitation professionals to make the most enlightened decisions and investments in the area of urban sanitation. Furthermore, it provides analytical tools to understand the financial and institutional framework of the sanitation sector, taking into account the needs of urban poor communities.

The course is composed of four modules:
Module 1: Introduction to Sanitation
Module 2: Economics, Pricing and Financing of the Sanitation Sector
Module 3: Institutional Aspects of the Sanitation Sector
Module 4: Sanitation and Poverty

This online course has been awarded with the International ECBCheck Quality Label for e-learning.

The course fee is USD 600 and UNITAR stresses that it does not provide any financial assistance.

Full information about the course is available at:
www.unitar.org/event/urbansanitation2013

WEDC & WSP online learning course – Rural Sanitation at Scale

The Water Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC) of Loughborough University, UK, in partnership with the Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) of the World Bank, recently developed a self-paced online course that addresses the important global challenges facing the water and sanitation sector.

The course, titled Rural Sanitation at Scalewhich is featured as a unit in WEDC’s master’s (MSc) program, is also offered free-of-charge as a non-accredited professional development unit for sector professionals interested in learning more about the issues of scaling-up sanitation in rural areas.
The course is divided into three parts: wedc-logo

Part 1 – Lays out the challenge of scaling up rural sanitation in context, examining fundamental aspects of sanitation provision and the reasons why, up to now, the goal of sanitation at scale has proved elusive. wsp-logo

Part 2 – Examines the core theory of change for sustainable programs. In particular it looks at the first two, of three, key components or pillars required for change: the creation of demand and the supply chain.

Part 3 – Continues to explore the core theory of change, focusing on the enabling environment. The unit concludes with a discussion of how the three pillars fit together and what steps are necessary to take an at-scale program forward.

Each section takes approximately 1 hour of study time, excluding associated reading, and is delivered using a variety of media including slide presentations, film clips, animations, photography and graphics supported by selected online publications.

Note: You will need to allow pop-ups for the course to run.

Dear Matt Damon,

This blog is a response to the video posted by Matt Damon, co-founder of water.org, where he announces a toilet strike to raise awareness for the water crisis.
——-

Dear Matt,

I enjoyed your video on water.org about going on a toilet strike. It is great that you are so passionate about realizing access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene for all. I personally also like it that you bring in some humor into our sometimes very boring sector.

In your video you mention that it costs US$25 to provide a person with sanitation for life. This is not true. Over the past four years IRC’s WASHCost project in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Andhra Pradesh (India) and Mozambique has collected, validated and analysed cost and service level information for water, sanitation and hygiene. Based on this research we know that for US$ 25 you can construct a traditional pit latrine with an impermeable slab which provides a basic service. In order to sustain the service provided by that traditional pit latrine it costs between US$ 1.5 and US$ 4 per person per year – so to provide sanitation for life means finding that US$ 1.5-4 every year …. for life. If you do not know how, or by whom, these recurrent costs will be financed, it is very likely that the latrine you are constructing today will break down or not used within two to three years, wasting your investment.

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Updates from the Sanitation Marketing Community of Practice

The Sanitation Marketing Community of Practice – an initiative of the Australian WASH Reference Group and managed by WaterAid Australia. Below are 2 new announcements. wateraid

1 – Yolande Coombes, WSP is available to answer SanMark questions
The Sanitation Marketing Community of Practice is very excited to have Yolande Coombes as our new resident guest expert. Yolande will be available in January 2013 to answer any SanMark practitioner questions. Questions can be submitted via the Sanitation Marketing website.
Be sure to include a brief description of your project and context. Questions, answers and comments will be posted on the website for peer to peer learning.

Yolande Coombes has more than 20 years experience in public health, behaviour change and evaluation. She gained her PhD in Public Health from the University of London. She has held academic positions at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and College of Medicine in Malawi. As a consultant she has worked on topics on a number of communicable and non-communicable diseases. She has worked for both Population Services International and Marie Stopes International providing technical social marketing, behaviour change, franchising and M&E support. In 2007 she took up a position as a specialist consultant in sanitation marketing and hygiene with WSP and became a staff member in 2010 responsible for leading WSP’s sanitation and hygiene work in Africa, including task managing the AfricaSan 3 conference in 2011.

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