Category Archives: Publications

Compendium of Sanitation Systems and Technologies, 2nd Edition

Compendium of Sanitation Systems and Technologies 2nd Edition, 2014. IWA; EAWAG.

Authors: E. Tilley, et al. eawag

This second, revised edition of the Compendium presents a huge range of information on sanitation systems and technologies in one volume. By ordering and structuring tried and tested technologies into one concise document, the reader is provided with a useful planning tool for making more informed decisions.

  • Part 1 describes different system configurations for a variety of contexts.
  • Part 2 consists of 57 different technology information sheets, which describe the main advantages, disadvantages, applications and the appropriateness of the technologies required to build a comprehensive sanitation system. Each technology information sheet is complemented by a descriptive illustration.
Download the English 2nd Edition
Download the 1st Edition

 

Solid Waste Management in the Pacific

Tibar dumpsite, Timor-Leste

Tibar dumpsite, Timor-Leste. Photo: M. Iyer/ADB

The Asian Development Bank has published a series of snapshots of the solid waste management situation in each of ADB’s 14 Pacific developing member countries. The series assesses solutions and challenges associated with the management of solid waste in the region, with a focus on financing, institutional arrangements and solid waste management technologies.

The series is one of the outputs of a US$ 450,000 ADB techical assistance project 45051-001, which aimed to improve the delivery of solid waste management in the Pacific region.

Overview reports

Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Appropriate Technologies June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Financial Arrangements June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Institutional Arrangements June 2014

Country snapshots

Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Cook Islands Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Fiji Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Kiribati Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: The Marshall Islands Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: The Federated States of Micronesia Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Nauru Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Palau Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Papua New Guinea Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Samoa Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Solomon Islands Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Timor-Leste Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Tonga Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Tuvalu Country Snapshot June 2014
Solid Waste Management in the Pacific: Vanuatu Country Snapshot June 2014

The business case for Base of the Pyramid sanitation

Ready for Funding: Innovative  sanitation businesses cover

The Sanitation Business Matchmaking Estafetta initiative has published a guide to business opportunities for sanitation in small towns and peri-urban areas in upcoming economies.

The sanitation sector offers long term, slow and stable return on investments and this can be a pearl in your portfolio. Moreover, sanitation services create social benefits which may be of interest for impact investors. The challenge of the sanitation industry is to access to the  right blend of financial products. Investors are invited to guide the sanitation industry in creating the conditions needed to realize ventures that prove to be attractive investment opportunities.

The guide targets investors, intermediaries and the private sector. It covers both household and public sanitation, as well as emptying & collection services, smart small sewerage, and treatment & reuse. Using Ghana as a case study, the guide presents a market analysis for sanitation investment opportunities for each of the before mentioned sanitation components and services.

Download Ready for Funding: Innovative sanitation businesses

Reducing vandalism of water and sanitation infrastructure

Water and sanitation utilities commonly experience vandalism and theft of their
property. These acts of vandalism are widespread in both urban and rural settings and take a number of forms: they include water theft leading directly to a loss of revenue for the utility, and the vandalism and theft of valuable metal pipes, fittings and manhole covers leading to an increase in the utility’s maintenance costs. The extent of vandalism and theft experienced in a project or defined area can have a direct and significant impact on the performance of a utility, and where the service is negatively affected, this will ultimately impact on the well-being of customers. Despite anecdotal evidence of the prevalence of this problem research into the subject remains very limited, with a lack of documentation on interventions to reduce vandalism or the extent to which a reduction in vandalism can lead to improved water and sanitation services.

To explore strategies for combating this issue, WSUP has recently carried out a case study documenting experience in the Copperbelt region of Zambia, where Nkana Water and Sewerage Company (NWSC) are implementing a three-pronged, integrated approach to vandalism reduction.

Want to find out more? For a quick read download our two-page Practice Note. For a more in-depth analysis, see our Topic Brief.

TB013_ReducingVandalism

 

THE URBAN PROGRAMMING GUIDE: How to design and implement a pro-poor urban WASH programme

Improving water, sanitation and hygiene services to low-income urban areas is a highly challenging and complex task. Traditional approaches have often failed to work. We need new approaches and fresh thinking. We need governments, donors and sector professionals genuinely committed to improving services in slum settlements. It’s challenging but it can be done! This guide offers some solutions based around WSUP’s experience: all you have to do is put them into practice!

The guide provides an introduction to urban WASH programming: how to design and implement a pro-poor urban water, sanitation and hygiene programme.

Urban Programming Guide
Who is this guide for?
This guide is primarily designed for WASH professionals working in governments, development agencies, funding agencies or civil society organisations. It will also be useful for professionals working for service providers including water utilities, local authorities and in the private sector.

How to use this guide
The guide provides an overview of some key strategies and service delivery models. It’s not intended to be encyclopaedic: it’s a rapid-reference document with the following intended uses:

  • To aid the planning, design and implementation of urban WASH programmes.
  • To assist with investment planning by service providers.
  • To point the reader towards further sources of information and guidance.

The guide is free to download from WSUP’s website: http://www.wsup.com/resource/the-urban-programming-guide

WEDC – A Collection of Contemporary Toilet Designs

EOOS-WEDC-Toilet-Book

A Collection of Contemporary Toilet Designs, 2014.

Author: Rod Shaw, ed. WEDC-RGB-adapted4

This collection is the result of the findings of EOOS research which was supported by Sandec, the Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag). It covers a wide range of contemporary toilet designs along with a valuable list of website links where additional information about each design can be sought.

This volume is a synthesis of the initial research log, designed and produced by The Water Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC) at Loughborough University. As conventional toilet designs are not included, it does not claim to be fully comprehensive but it nevertheless provides a useful overview of current research and development for fieldworkers and practitioners as well as engineers and researchers.

Preventing violence linked to WASH: practitioners’ toolkit

WeCan Campaign poster used in an IDP camp in Batticoloa, Sri Lanka to help respond to and prevent violence against women

WeCan Campaign poster used in an IDP camp in Batticoloa, Sri Lanka to help respond to and prevent violence against women

Poorly designed and located water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions can increase people’s vulnerability to violence. This can range from sexual harassment when practicing open defecation or collecting water, to staff demanding sexual favours in exchange for access to WASH facilities.<

With this in mind, WaterAid/SHARE have published a toolkit  [1] to help practitioners make water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) safer for the most vulnerable.

The toolkit consists of briefing notes, a checklist of actions based on the ten key principles for reducing vulnerability to WASH-related violence, and a range of tools including case studies of good practice.  It is relevant for both humanitarian and development contexts. The materials also include videos, scenarios for training and tools for use with communities, key extracts from international human rights instruments and a folder of additional supporting information

Any actor working in humanitarian, development or transitional contexts can request free access to the materials by sending an email to gbv@wateraid.org.

[1] House, S., Ferron, S., Sommer, M. and Cavill, S. 2014. Violence, gender and WASH : a practitioner’s toolkit : making water, sanitation and hygiene safer through improved programming and services. London, UK, WaterAid/SHARE.

For more information:

  • House, S. et al., 2014. Violence, gender and WASH : a practitioner’s toolkit : making water, sanitation and hygiene safer through improved programming and services. Humanitarian exchange magazine, no. 60, February 2014. Available at: <http://washurl.net/5as6s3>
  • Violence and vulnerability: making WASH safe. Hygiene promotion in emergencies newsletter, no. 5, March 2014, Available at: <http://washurl.net/8k5b0a>
  • SHARE: Equity

In 2012 WaterAid America released “1 in 3“, a video highlighting the impact of the lack of sanitation on women.