Pacific Love (Unofficial Peace Corps Anthem) – Poop in a Hole

Focus on WASH & Nutrition: WASHplus Weekly, Sept 5, 2014

Issue 160 | Sept 5, 2014 | Focus on WASH & Nutrition

This issue contains some of the most recent studies on stunting, open defecation, nutritional interventions, and other WASH and nutrition issues. Recent reports from the World Bank Water and Sanitation Program discuss the impacts of improved sanitation on child growth in Vietnam and Lao PDR. Training materials include the new Global Handwashing Day guide from the Global Public-Private Partnership on Handwashing and a WASHplus infographic on tippy taps.

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Left, Right, and Toilets. Ideas for India, Aug 2014. D Spears. (Link)
Eliminating open defecation in India is a policy priority. This column contends that successful strategies for reducing open defecation may not fit policy stereotypes of the left or the right. While rural sanitation policy in states where this practice is most concentrated has been focused on latrine construction, promotion of latrine use is what will make a difference.

What Do Toilets Have To Do with Nutrition? More Than You Might Think. IFPRI Blog, July 2014. L Haddad. (Link)
A new working paper from the Institute of Development Studies has looked at data from 116 low- and middle-income countries from 1970 to 2012. It found that access to safe water (20 percent) and improved sanitation (15 percent) explained 35 percent of the variation in stunting rates across countries and time periods. This reflects two things: the fact that water and sanitation are strongly linked to stunting reduction, and that both water and sanitation coverage have increased strongly in the past four decades.

JOURNAL ARTICLES BY PUBLICATION DATE

The Effect of India’s Total Sanitation Campaign on Defecation Behaviors and Child Health in Rural Madhya Pradesh: A Cluster Randomized Controlled TrialPLoS Medicine, Aug 2014. R Sumeet. (Link)
The objective of this study is to measure the effect of the Total Sanitation Campaign implemented with capacity building support from The World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program in Madhya Pradesh on availability of individual household latrines (IHLs), defecation behaviors, and child health (diarrhea, highly credible gastrointestinal illness [HCGI], parasitic infections, anemia, and growth). The intervention led to modest increases in availability of IHLs and even more modest reductions in open defecation. These improvements were insufficient to improve child health outcomes. The results underscore the difficulty of achieving adequately large improvements in sanitation levels to deliver expected health benefits within large-scale rural sanitation programs.

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Seven journalists win prestigious media awards for excellence in reporting on critical water, sanitation and hygiene issues

WMA-Winners

Geneva/Stockholm, 5 September 2014 – Seven journalists were named today as winners of the “2014 WASH Media Awards” competition for their excellence in reporting on water, sanitation and hygiene-related (WASH) issues.

 The journalists, their winning entries, and the award categories are:

  • Marcelo Leite (Brazil):The Battle of Belo Monte” (Category: Water and Energy)
  • Natasha Khan (Canada) and Ketaki Gokhale (USA) No Menstrual Hygiene For Indian Women Holds Economy Back(Category: Equity and Inclusion in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene)
  • Seun Aikoye (Nigeria):Lagosians shun public toilets as open defecation continues(Category: Ending Open Defecation)
  • Mbali Chiya (South Africa):Human Rights to Water and Sanitation (Category: The Human Right to Water and Sanitation)
  • Umaru Sanda Amadu (Ghana): “Water Wahala(Category: WASH in the Future: The Post-2015 Development Agenda)
  • Dilrukshi Handunnetti (Sri Lanka): “Sri Lankan Girls Miss out on Sanitation Gains(Category: Monitoring WASH Commitments)

The winning entries can be viewed here: http://www.wsscc.org/media/wash-media-awards/2012-2014. A high resolution photograph and summary video can also be found there or at the World Water Week page.

The winners received their awards today during a ceremony at the closing plenary session of the annual World Water Week in Stockholm.  In Stockholm this week, the journalists shared their experiences with leading water, sanitation, environment and development experts. The week concluded with a 2014 Stockholm Statement on Water, a collection of films and papers calling for a Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) on Water.

Journalists are key partners for sanitation, hygiene and water sector professionals in their awareness raising, advocacy and behaviour change work. Journalists play a central role in the highlighting of water and gender related issues and positioning of women as environmental leaders. They greatly contribute to bringing in the spotlight the too often neglected issues of the necessity of toilets and hand washing for a dignified, safe and healthy life for billions of people.

The biannual WASH Media Awards competition is sponsored by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC, www.wsscc.org) and the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI, www.siwi.org). More than 100 entries from 30 countries were evaluated by a Mr. Mark Tran, a notable international correspondent for The Guardian, UK.

Interactive Compendium of Sanitation Systems and Technologies now online!

The interactive version of the Compendium of Sanitation Systems and Technologies (eCompendium) is now online!

The eCompendium is the digital version of the popular and well-know reference-manual Compendium of Sanitation Systems and Technologies published by Eawag/Sandec, WSSCC and IWA. It is a interactive planning tool designed for engineers and planners to facilitate decision-making on sanitation systems and technologies in meetings and workshops. The main added value to the eCompendium is that the user is guided throughout the entire sanitation-chain by the aid of interactive links. In order to select suitable technologies, a customised filter can be applied based on the desired input or output products of technologies. eComendium_Icon

It is based on the second edition of the Compendium, which was recently published by Eawag/Sandec, WSSCC and IWA. It comprises the same content as the print version, plus additional links to references, further readings and cross-references to the Sustainable Sanitation and Water Management (SSWM) Toolbox at your fingertips. All Technology Info Sheets are now stored in the SSWM database and can be directly linked with previously uploaded factsheets, further readings, training materials, weblinks, videos and – yes, even ready-made powerpoint presentations from the SSWM repository!

The eCompendium has been designed and implemented by the SSWM team on behalf of Sandec/Eawag. It is one of a series of specific topic entry pages (STEPs) with the aim of making the SSWM content more accessible for particular target groups of SSWM partners and contributors.

  • Go to the eCompendium
  • Visit the SSWM Toolbox
  • Join us at the World Water Week in Stockholm on Thursday September 4 from 12-13h at the Swiss Water Partnership Booth to get a life guided tour through the tool!

For the SSWM Team,
Dorothee Spuhler (seecon international gmbh)

Unclogging the Blockages in Sanitation

Unclogging-Blockages-brochure

Perhaps one of the more ignored or misunderstood elements of water poverty by the general population and even the charitable sector is sanitation services. When you think about providing clean water, you conjure images of clear drinking water pouring out of a tap or buckets of well water used to water crops and serve livestock.

But then there’s the other stuff—the stuff that is not as pretty to think about or even to deal with, but is just as important—like unclogging toilets, and building latrines, and providing sanitary napkin containers and services for female students. That’s all sanitation.

The first Unclogging the Blockages conference organised by IRC, PSI, Water for People and WSUP Enterprises, took place on February 18-20, 2014 in Kampala, Uganda. More than 170 people from in and out of the sector and around the world came together to explore the various challenges for sanitation as a business (SAAB) and began working on short and long-term solutions.

Participants identified seven key components to SAAB: (1) public sector; (2) business models; (3) finance; (4) technology; (5) demand creation and behaviour change; (6) monitoring; and (7) intersectoral links.

For each component participants plotted out potential outcomes and ways forward based on their ideas and a 30-day challenge, for example:

Business Models
Blockage: lack of models that are pro-poor inclusive; lack of understanding of technology
Desired outcome: Consumer understanding/happiness: Families say, “The toilet is my favorite part of the house.”
30-Day Challenge: Know your customers deeply for better service and success. —Advocacy through creative formats, get to the point and make it attractive, prove we have results.

The full set of action plans with a detailed breakdown by tasks and groups responsible for each of the seven themes is in the Unclogging the Blockages report. The Conference report and an accompanying factsheet are available at: www.ircwash.org/resources/unclogging-blockages-sanitation-business

A full set of conference materials including Powerpoint presentations can be found on the SuSanA website at: www.susana.org/en/events/past-event-pages/details/8

Three articles published in the July 2014 edition of Waterlines emerged from the conference:

Mulumba, J.N., Nothomb, C., Potter, A. and Snel, M. 2014. Striking the balance : what is the role of the public sector in sanitation as a service and as a business? Waterlines, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 195-210. DOI: 10.3362/2046-1887.2014.021

Rojas Williams, S.M. and Sauer, J. 2014. Unclogging the blockages in sanitation : inter-sector linkages. Waterlines, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 211-219. DOI: 10.3362/2046-1887.2014.022

Sugden, S., 2014. Latrine design: go in peace. Waterlines, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 220-239. DOI: 10.3362/1756-3488.2014.023

Sanitation Business Catalogue

Sanitation-Business-CatalogueIn this catalogue you will find 27 business propositions from sanitation entrepreneur association APPSANI in Indonesia to ZanaAfrica sanitary pads in Kenya.

Together, they offer a variety of services and all of them are looking to consolidate or expand their business, and bring sanitation services to scale for customers at the Base of the Pyramid.

This catalogue was produced for the Sanitation Business Matchmaking event at the first World BoP Convention & Expo in Singapore, 28-30 of August 2014.

Each individual business sheet in this catalogue describes what the entrepreneur offers and what he is looking for.

Download the catalogue at:
www.ircwash.org/resources/sanitation-business-catalogue

New results report from the WSSCC Global Sanitation Fund

GSF Logo 15kb (EN)According to its latest Progress Report update, national programs supported through the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) show consistent strong growth and have made significant progress in eradicating the practice of open defecation.

Almost six million people now live in open-defecation free (ODF) communes, villages and districts. This is two million more than six months ago The total number of 3.1 million people with an improved latrine as a result of GSF-funded programs is around double the number reported a year ago.

As of 1 July 2014, the Global Sanitation Fund supports work actively in Cambodia, Ethiopia, India, Madagascar, Malawi, Nepal, Nigeria, Senegal, Tanzania, Togo and Uganda. In those countries, more than 140 sub-grantees have raised awareness of sanitation and hygiene nationally and in a number of regions. As a result of their work, more than three million people have access to improved toilets, among other leading indicators of progress.

The total number of 3.1 million people with an improved latrine as a result of GSF-funded programs is around double the number reported a year ago (1.6 million in June 2013). It is encouraging that the number of people in ODF environments and the number of people with improved latrines has continued to increase.

It suggests that efforts by WSSCC in the initial years to build consultative processes, introduce new systems and familiarize sub-grantees and local governments with methods of community-led total sanitation were a sound investment.

This mid-year progress update presents the on-going results of GSF program implementation.

To download a copy of the report, click here.