WASHplus Weekly: Focus on WASH & Nutrition

WASHplus Weekly | Issue 171| Dec 12, 2014 | Focus on WASH & Nutrition

This issue provides updates on new resources since the September 2014 WASHplus Weekly on WASH and nutrition with links to a December 15, USAID webinar; the recently published Global Nutrition Report; presentations at the UNICEF Stop Stunting Conference in India; and just-published studies on stunting, environmental enteropathy, and other WASH and nutrition topics.

EVENTS

December 15, 2014, Draft Guidance for USAID-Funded Nutrition-Sensitive ProgrammingLink
During this webinar, Richard Greene, senior deputy assistant administrator with USAID’s Bureau for Food Security, will share a two-page draft guidance document that will assist implementers in applying the new USAID Multi-Sectoral Nutrition Strategy to nutrition-sensitive agriculture programs.

November 19–21, 2014, The Second International Conference on Nutrition
(ICN2)
Link | Vision statement
The Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) was a high-level intergovernmental meeting that focused global attention on addressing malnutrition in all its forms. The two main outcome documents—the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and the Framework for Action—were endorsed by participating governments at the conference, committing world leaders to establishing national policies aimed at eradicating malnutrition and transforming food systems to make nutritious diets available to all.

November 10–12, 2014, UNICEF Stop Stunting Conference, India. Link
The Stop Stunting regional conference provided a knowledge-for-action platform where state-of-the-art evidence, better practices, and innovations were shared to accelerate sectoral and cross-sectoral policies, programs, and research in nutrition and sanitation to reduce the prevalence of child stunting in South Asia.

REFERENCE MANUALS

Global Nutrition Report, 2014. International Food Policy Research Institute. Link | WaterAid review of the Global Nutrition Report
The first-ever Global Nutrition Report provides a comprehensive narrative and analysis on the state of the world’s nutrition. The Global Nutrition Report convenes existing processes, highlights progress in combating malnutrition, and identifies gaps and proposes ways to fill them. Through this, the report helps to guide action, build accountability, and spark increased commitment for further progress toward reducing malnutrition much faster.

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene in Nutrition Efforts: A Resource Guide, 2014. WASH Advocates. Link
This resource guide includes manuals, reports, academic studies, and organizations working on WASH and nutrition. The guide can serve as a tool for implementers and advocates in the WASH/Nutrition nexus looking to pursue and promote integrated programming.

Continue reading

Urban Water Supply and Sanitation in Southeast Asia: A Guide to Good Practice

Urban Water Supply and Sanitation in Southeast Asia: A Guide to Good Practice, 2014.

Arthur C. McIntosh, Asian Development Bank.

Objective – This book provides stakeholders (governments, development partners, utilities, consultants, donors, academe, media, civil society, and nongovernment organizations) with a point of reference and some tools for moving forward effectively and efficiently in the urban water supply and sanitation sector in Southeast Asia. New generations of water professionals should not have to repeat the mistakes of the past. Instead they should be able to take what has been learned so far and move forward. To facilitate this process, this book was designed to improve understanding and awareness of the issues and possible solutions among all stakeholders in the sector.

Scope – This book focuses on six countries in Southeast Asia—Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Philippines, Thailand, and Viet Nam. Field data were obtained from 14 utilities in these six countries. Future studies should bolster the analysis of sanitation, now still regrettably weak for lack of data.

Open Defecation in India by Assa Doron and Robin Jeffrey

Open Defecation in India. EPW Economic & Political Weekly, December 6, 2014 vol xlix no 49

Authors: Assa Doron, Robin Jeffrey

This study identifies 11 issues that have inhibited the spread of a comprehensive sanitation programme. It emphasises the complexity of issues and helps avoid the facile targeting of the poor as deficient citizens, whose latrine practices are viewed as a “primitive” source of social disorder and disease. Recognition that many factors are involved and interrelated might also serve as a warning against patchwork policies that disregard local context in their haste to proclaim another district an “open defecation free zone”.

Handwashing article receives the Elsevier Atlas award

Elsevier, a world-leading publisher and provider of information solutions for science, health, and technology professionals selected the Effect of a behaviour-change intervention on handwashing with soap in India (SuperAmma): a cluster-randomised trial, The Lancet Global Health, March 2014 article to receive the Elsevier Atlas award. lshtm

Each month a single Atlas article is selected from published research from across Elsevier’s 1,800 journals by an external advisory board made up of individuals from NGOs including the following organizations, among several others:

• Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO)
• Health Informational for all – HIFA 2015
• International Training and Outreach Center in Africa (ITOCA)
• TEDMED
• United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP)
• University of California, Berkeley (Centre for Effective Global Action)
• Global Health Policy Institute
• United Nations University
• OXFAM
• Bioversity International

Atlas articles showcase research that can (or already has) significantly impact people’s lives around the world and we hope that bringing wider attention to this research will go some way to ensuring its successful implementation.

Dec 15, 2014 – Launch of study on WASH and maternal/newborn health

Invitation to attend the
Launch of the PLOS Medicine paper
From joint thinking to joint action: A call to action on improving water, sanitation and hygiene for maternal and newborn health
and a discussion on how water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) can accelerate progress on maternal and newborn health

  • on the 15th of December 2014 at 5:00 – 6:00 PM
  • at the John Snow Lecture Theatre,
  • and followed by a reception until 7:00 PM,
  • at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT.

We are delighted to invite you to attend the launch of an important new paper published by PLOS Medicine. This paper, authored by scientists and technical experts from leading universities and international agencies, outlines the importance of WASH for maternal and neonatal health outcomes. lshtm

The event will be chaired by Oliver Cumming (LSHTM) and speakers will include:

  • Ms Jane Edmondson (Head of Human Development, UK DFID)
  • Dr Maria Neira (Director of Public Health and Environment, WHO)
  • Professor Oona Campbell (LSHTM)
  • Professor Wendy Graham (University of Aberdeen, & SoapBox)
  • Dr Paul Simpson (Deputy Editor, PLOS Medicine)
  • Ms Yael Velleman (Senior Policy Analyst, WaterAid)

To attend, please kindly register at https://plos-medicine.eventbrite.co.uk. Seating is limited, so we would request that you register as soon as possible (free of charge).

David Neal: Handwashing and the Science of Habit, Dec 4, 2014

David Neal: Handwashing and and the Science of Habit, December 4, 2014. This webinar was organized by WASHplus and the Public-Private Partnership on Handwashing.

Treat your sanitation workers well

There are two contrasting stories this week on the treatment of sanitation workers: in China a local restaurant treats 180 of them to a free lunch, while in Gaza they go on strike after having received no pay for over six months.

More than 180 sanitation workers in Chengdu, Sichuan province enjoyed a free lunch courtesy of a local hotpot restaurant.

More than 180 sanitation workers in Chengdu, Sichuan province enjoyed a free lunch courtesy of a local hotpot restaurant. Photo: weibo.com

Sanitation workers in China get low pay, have poor working conditions and work long hours. Mr. Li, a restaurant owner in Chengdu, decided it was time to show some appreciation for their hard work, especially now as temperatures were dropping. He offered over 180 local sanitation workers a free lunch; they were “encouraged to order whatever they wanted, including alcohol”, writes Dina Li in the Shanghaiist.

The free lunch was also a compensation for the mess created when Mr Li opened his new restaurant and employees distributed more than 100,000 leaflets, most of which ended up on the streets for sanitation workers to clean up.

Waste piles up in Al-Shifa Hospital, Gaza Strip, as a result of strike by sanitation workers.

Waste piles up in Al-Shifa Hospital, Gaza Strip, as a result of strike by sanitation workers. Photo: Mohammad Asad, MEMO

How differently sanitation workers are treated in the Gaza Strip. Since the formation of the Palestinian unity government in June 2014, they have not received any pay. This has spurred a strike with severe consequences for the health care system. The accumulation of large piles of waste and garbage has forced the Al-Shifa Hospital to stop all work in their operation and emergency rooms.

Deputy Minister of Health, Yusuf Abu Al-Reesh warned of dangerous health conditions inside the hospitals and medical centres in Gaza since staff from the private sanitation companies went on strike.

Source:

  • Dina Li, Chengdu hotpot restaurant treats over 180 sanitation workers to free lunch, Shanghaiist, 5 Dec 2014
  • Gaza sanitation workers’ strike stalls hospital operations, Middle East Monitor, 4 Dec 2014