Tag Archives: climate change

SuSanA – Compilation of 13 factsheets on key sustainable sanitation topics

Compilation of 13 factsheets on key sustainable sanitation topics, 2012.

This factsheet book is a compilation of 13 thematic factsheets which were produced by the eleven SuSanA working groups. What makes these factsheets special is that they are multi-authored by people from different organisations and by free-lance consultants. The factsheets were developed in a long process involving many discussions and review loops which were mostly carried out in public, e.g. at working group meetings, with the working group mailing lists or, since July 2011, also in the open SuSanA discussion forum (http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/6-susana-working-groups).

Table of Contents:

Executive Summary

WG 1: Capacity development
Capacity development for sustainable sanitation
Spuhler, D., McCreary, C., Fogde, M., Jenssen, P.

WG 2: Finance and economics
Financial and economic analysis
Parkinson, J., Hutton, G., Pfeiffer, V., Blume, S., Feiereisen, P.

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GIS & mapping tools for water and sanitation infrastructure

Continuing developments in GIS software are opening up a number of possibilities for capturing and processing geographical data, and then presenting it via the internet. The ability to manage information on water and sanitation services and then overlay it onto Google Earth images has wide-ranging benefits for project planning and design, and for monitoring, advocacy and accountability.

Practice Note 3 - GISThis Practice Note introduces three tools of this type – Google Fusion Tables as used by WSUP, WaterAid’s WaterPoint Mapper and Water For People’s FLOW – and briefly discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Click on the image to download the Practice Note.

This document forms part of WSUP’s Practice Note and Topic Brief publication series. Further documents can be downloaded from the WSUP website  http://www.wsup.com/sharing/index.htm

Ghana – National WASH Conference to focus on climate change

Ghana’s 21st National WASH Stakeholders Conference dubbed Mole Conference, comes off in Accra on Tuesday on the theme, “Global Climate Change: A Challenge For The WASH Sector in Ghana.”

According to the Coalition of NGOs in the Water and Sanitation Sector (CONIWAS), the Mole XXI Conference, which will be held from July 20, 2010 to July 23, 2010, is focusing on Climate Change because it is becoming increasingly clear that the phenomenon poses a dire threat to the realisation of a world of hope, tolerance and social justice, where improved water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), help the poor and vulnerable to live in dignity.

“The poor people that CONIWAS seek to serve are already experiencing the impact of climate change in their day –to- day lives. As a result of climate change greater numbers of people lack access to adequate and safe water, health threats are increasing, more people are suffering from hunger, productivity in natural resource based livelihoods is declining and poor people are getting poorer,” a paper prepared by the planning committee of the conference and CONIWAS secretariat stated.

The coalition deduced that the poor in Ghana, as in the rest of Africa, are especially vulnerable to climate change, due to the range of negative impacts they must deal with, the sensitivity of most livelihoods to climatic changes, and people’s low adaptive capacity.

“The impacts of climate on the WASH sector in Ghana have become more apparent in the past five years than ever. Many communities are observing a drastic decrease in the yields of water facilities (boreholes and wells), many wells that previously provided sufficient water to communities are drying up, and reservoirs for urban water supply are under increasing threat of drying up with severe consequences on water supply, sanitation and hygiene,” the NGOs stressed.

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Providing toilets, safe water is top route to reducing world poverty: UN University

Mapping vulnerable communities essential to global health and poverty

Simply installing toilets where needed throughout the world and ensuring safe water supplies would do more to end crippling poverty and improve world health than any other possible measure, according to an analysis released [on 19 Oct 2008] by the United Nations University – International Network on Water, Environment and Health (UNU-INWEH).

The analysis says better water and sanitation reduces poverty in three ways.

  • New service business opportunities are created for local entrepreneurs;
  • Significant savings are achieved in the public health sector; and
  • Individual productivity is greater in contributing to local and national economies.

UNU-INWEH also calls on the world’s research community to help fill major knowledge gaps that impede progress in addressing the twin global scourges of unsafe water and poor sanitation.

Information gaps include such seemingly obvious measures as common definitions and worldwide maps to identify communities most vulnerable to health-related problems as a result of poor access to sanitation and safe water. UNU-INWEH also calls for creation of a “tool-box” to help policy-makers choose between available options in local circumstances.

[...]

In the analysis, prepared for global policy makers and released Oct. 20 at the start of a two-day UNU-INWEH-hosted international meeting [Sanitation: Innovations for Policy and Finance] in Hamilton, Canada, experts offer a prescription for policy reform.

[...]

The UNU-INWEH analysis identifies population growth, poverty, climate change, globalization and inappropriate policies on investment, urbanization, and intensification of agriculture as the five global trends most likely to exacerbate water supply and sanitation problems in years to come.

[...]

“As the International Year of Sanitation winds down, UNU invites and welcomes the help of all scientists who agree we can and must do more,” says Prof. Susan Elliott, a Senior Research Fellow at UNU-INWEH and a professor at McMaster University.

[...]

The “toolbox” idea would involve “a virtual library and database of educational materials, technologies, governance, models, etc. would facilitate information exchange of both established and innovative tools.”

As well, “validated models need to be developed that will predict the impact of climate change on water and wastewater infrastructure, water availability, water quality and waterborne / water-associated diseases.”

UNU-INWEH was created in 1996 to strengthen water management capacity, particularly of developing countries, and to provide on-the-ground project support. With core funding provided by the Government of Canada, it is hosted by McMaster University, Canada.

Source: UNU / EurekAlert, 19 Oct 2008 – see also Fiona Harvey, Financial Times, 20 Oct 2008 and Reuters, 19 Oct 2008

Indonesia: Pampanga dengue cases up by 200%

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO – Health officials in Central Luzon recorded a whooping 238 percent increase in dengue cases in the region compared to the same period last year.

(…)  The DOH is calling on local communities to actively participate in environmental sanitation activities like clean up drives.

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Ghana – ‘I will solve sanitation problems when elected’ – Nduom

The Presidential Candidate of the CPP, Dr. Paa Kwesi Nduom says when elected President, the first 100 days of his government will focus on issues of climate change as well as sanitation. He said well meaning but ineffective efforts to deal with the problem of sanitation can engender a national cancer. Dr. Nduom stated this at a Presidential debate on environment and climate change at the Fourth Annual Environmental Film Festival in Accra.

More – GBC

ADB: Asia needs sustainable cities

By GILLIAN WONG, SINGAPORE (AP)

Asian countries need help to build cities that can cope with the region’s “unprecedented” urban expansion of more than 100,000 people a day over the next two decades, the Asian Development Bank said Wednesday.

(…) The study also said that cities needed to better control their waste and improve sewer systems, particularly as deforestation and climate change suggest that cities should plan for more frequent and intense flooding in the future.

Sewers should be constructed where densities are more than 100 persons per 1 hectare (2.47 acre). Alternatively, a sanitation system made up of septic tanks and storm water or drainage systems could be viable, the study suggested.  (…)

Read all Associated Press

Climate Change Deepening World Water Crisis

United Nations, 21 March, (IPS): When U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addressed the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland last January, his primary focus was not on the impending global economic recession but on the world’s growing water crisis.

“A shortage of water resources could spell increased conflicts in the future,” he told the annual gathering of business tycoons, academics and leaders from governments, intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations.

“Population growth will make the problem worse. So will climate change. As the global economy grows, so will its thirst. Many more conflicts lie just over the horizon,” he warned.

Anders Berntell, executive director of the Stockholm International Water Institute, says the lack of safe drinking water for over 1.0 billion people worldwide, and the lack of safe sanitation for over 2.5 billion, “is an acute and devastating humanitarian crisis.”

“But this is a crisis of management, not a water crisis per se, because it is caused by a chronic lack of funding and inadequate understanding of the need for sanitation and good hygiene at the local level,” Berntell told IPS.

He said: “This can and must be fixed through improved governance and management, and increased funding, and sustained efforts to achieve the U.N.’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs),” which include the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger and adequate water and sanitation.

A U.N. study released on the eve of World Water Day Mar. 22 says the lack of safe drinking water is not confined to the world’s poorer nations; it also threatens over 100 million Europeans.

Read MoreAsian Tribune