Tag Archives: open defecation-free villages

Nepal, Chitwan: a toilet revolution

Take a Pee & Get One Rupee. If you have traveled on the Prithvi Highway last year, you must have noticed this seemingly-ridiculous slogan in Darechowk, near Kurintar. Of course, if you have used public toilets before, then you may be more used to paying a rupee to urinate. Instead, members of The Sewa Nepal, a local NGO, pay anyone a rupee if he or she uses their toilet. And no, they are not joking.

“Previously, people used to mock us but now they have realized the message we are trying to convey: Urine is a valuable asset,” says Srirendra Shrestha, founder and coordinator of the NGO. Thus, what the NGO does is collect the urine and convert it to fertilizers for the villagers around. A pretty unique business idea, but there’s more to this than just that.

The NGO, which is involved in environmental conservation and community sanitation, has actively pursued to make Darechowk a model Village Development Committee (VDC). The group’s efforts finally became successful when Darechowk was declared the 18th Open Defecation Free (ODF) VDC in Chitwan a week ago—thus paving the way for a cleaner, sanitized village.

The ODF movement in Nepal has been supported by the Department of Water Supply and Sewerage (DWSS) in coordination with World Health Organization, UNICEF and NGOs like Environment and Public Health Organization (ENPHO). The Sewa Nepal has been the local partner of the movement, providing toilet pans and pipes to individual households in Darechowk. Locals say this is a sanitation movement led by the common people. Thus, among the 1,656 households in the VDC, more than half have a proper toilet. Further, around 770 houses have built an EcoSan (short for ecological sanitation) toilet, the most preferred type as it can collect human waste that can be used as fertiliser.

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Mina Pokharel

Mina Pokharel has been using human manure for the past year and is quite impressed with the results. “After I started using urine as fertilizer, the yield has been very good and the vegetables taste better too,” she says. Did it ever feel disgusting? “It did in the beginning. But once I started reaping the benefits, I realized the value of our own waste.”

This revolutionary ecological movement is spearheaded by the VDC officials themselves. The VDC allocated part of its annual budget to support the movement by providing two sacks of cement to each household with additional monetary support for poor families. “We spent about Rs. 1 million [US$ 13,300 = € 10,100] on this movement,” says VDC secretary Nilkantha Lamichchane. “Declaring the VDC an ODF village has immensely boosted the morale of villagers. We hope to have proper toilets in all the households by the end of this year.”

Teachers have played a central role in this movement, which took its current shape after DWSS conducted a School-Led Total Sanitation project in 2006 in the district. The programme stressed on teaching sanitation habits in schools and also held discussions and sanitation awareness campaigns, besides training teachers on the use of various types of toilets. The programme was largely successful; since then 378 community schools and 239 public and private schools in the district have been declared ODF schools. The excitement associated with this movement has spilled over to adjoining VDCs of neighboring districts as well. Villagers from Makwanpur, Gorkha and Dhading are trying to follow the Darechowk model and implement the programme in earnest. However, no municipality has yet been declared ODF in Nepal.

In a country where only 27 percent of the population has access to sanitation, this model is proving to be one of the few shining lights. Districts like Jajarkot and Rukum saw the deaths of hundreds last year due to diarrhoea, a disease that could have been prevented had this model been implemented there. The ODF model is not only important for health reasons. There are important sociological impacts that having a private toilet has had in Darechowk.

Ask Sadhana Adhikari, for instance. The 15-year-old student says a toilet is the best thing to have happened to her. “I don’t have to suffer any more embarrassments during my periods. The toilet offers me privacy and it’s easier to remain clean during that time.”

Related web site: RCNN – Nepal Node for Sustainable Sanitation (NNSS)

Source: Ujjwal Pradhan, Kathmandu Post / NGO Forum, 24 Jul 2010

WSP – Stepping Onto the Sanitation Ladder: Stopping Open Defecation in Rural Ethiopia

India: impact of sanitation award scheme to be assessed

The government will assess the impact and sustainability of the Nirmal Gram Puraskar (Clean Village Award) scheme implemented between 2005-2008. The Department of Drinking Water Supply under the Ministry of Rural Development will conduct a survey, based on a methodology that it developed with UNICEF, in 12 states*.

The objective is to assess the impact of NGP [Nirmal Gram Puraskar] on the pace of progress of sanitation availability and usage in the country under TSC [Total Sanitation Campaign] and its related impacts on health, education, gender empowerment, social inclusion in rural areas on different user groups particularly the rural poor. This study will also assess the durability and sustainability on the provision and usage of sanitary facilities over time. The rational of this evaluation study will be to provide important evidence on the NGP component of the TSC. The Study will provide a national level report on assessment of impact of NGP.

The Government of India introduced the NGP incentive scheme in 2003 under its Total Sanitation Campaign to reward local government institutions at village, block and district level, that had achieved full sanitation coverage (for households, schools and day-care centres) and were declared open defecation free.

* States to be covered in NGP assessment survey

Source: DDWS

A 2008 UNICEF study on NGP villages found high levels of non-use of toilets (34%), and that only 34% of schools had separate toilets for girls and boys. In most villages the study found a “severe drop in efforts towards social mobilisation and monitoring of ODF status after the NGP award has been received. This has resulted in slippage of ODF status in many GPs and is a serious concern with respect to sustainability”.

Source: PIB, 13 May 2010 ; DDWS/Ministry of Rural Development, 11 May 2010 ; India Sanitation Portal – Nirmal Gram Puraskar

India, Himachal Pradesh: good response to sanitation awareness campaign

The hill state of Himachal Pradesh is surging ahead on the path of becoming completely free from open defecation by the end of 2010.

There has been a tremendous increase in rural sanitation coverage from less than 30 per cent in 2001 to over 80 per cent in 2009. The campaign to stamp out open defecation is eliciting encouraging response from the rural masses and yielding a positive outcome.

The gram panchayats, which achieve 100 per cent sanitation coverage in terms of individual household toilets, schools and anganwadis, defecation-free and clean environment are being provided fiscal incentives. As many as 22 gram panchayats (village councils) were given the “Nirmal Gram Puraskar” in 2006-07 and the number rose to 245 in 2007-08 and 253 in the following year. Gram panchayats receiving the incentives could use the funds for maintaining sanitation facilities in their respective areas. The blocks and districts could use the funds to set up monitoring mechanisms for sanitation. However, the gram panchayat is derecognised if it fails to maintain the ODF status.

The maximum number of 125 Nirmal panchayats was in Mandi, followed by 29 in Kangra, 23 in Shimla, 25 in Hamirpur, 15 in Solan, 13 in Sirmaur, 7 in Chamba, 8 in Bilaspur, 3 each in Kullu and Lahaul and Spiti, one each in Una and Kinnaur. They were given cash rewards ranging from Rs 50,000 to Rs 5 lakh A sum of Rs 3.65 crore would be disbursed among the ‘Nirmal Gram Panchayats’ so that the remaining panchayats were also inspired to follow their footsteps. The government has decided to honour the people who contribute in the implementation of total sanitation programme in their respective areas.

The government has also started the ’Maharishi Valmiki Sampuran Swachhata Puraskar’ to help achieve the goal of safe and hygienic sanitation facilities for all and to motivate the panchayati raj institutions. School sanitation reward scheme and Mahila Mandal Protsahan Yojna has also been started.

Source: The Tribune, 21 Feb 2010

Nepal, additional marks to the students having toilet

The story about students in Dhikpur who get an additional 10 marks in their exams for having a toilet in their house has been reported a year ago in February 2009.

In an update, the same newspaper adds schools give an additional 5 marks in exam to students who only have a temporary toilet in their home. The students have made a made a slogan, “I am proud of having toilet in my house”.

The Dhikpur Village Development Committee (VDC) has now been declared the first open defecation free in the Rapti zone. Anyone who visits Dhikpur VDC has to use toilet. Otherwise, the students will penalize them. Out of 2183 toilets constructed in the VDC, 1433 are concrete and 750 are temporary toilets.

Source: Durga Lal K.C., Kantipur / NGO Forum, 29 Jan 2010

Nepal, Surkhet: toilet a must for local elections

A campaign is going to be started in Surkhet district, in the Mid-Western Development Region of Nepal, to make it mandatory for candidates in the local elections to have a toilet in his/her house. This campaign is a part of the five-year sanitation action plan prepared by the Regional Monitoring and Supervision Office to make Surkhet an open defecation free district by 2015.

Stakeholders and political parties have committed to implement the action plan. According to the action plan, the political parties have to give high priority to sanitation, include sanitation in their manifesto and mobilize their youth wings to work in the sanitation sector.

In related news, the Village Development Committee (VDC) of Maidi, in Dhading District, central Nepal, said it will cut off its services to those consumers who do not construct toilets in their homes. The VDC has launched a “One House One Toilet” campaign that it hopes will help to declare Maidi an open defecation free zone.

Source: Kantipur / NGO Forum, 28 Jan 2010 ; Kantipur / NGO Forum, 27 Jan 2010

Liberia – 3 communities achieve Total Sanitation status

Liberia: Three communities meet CLTS compliance

Three communities in Liberia have been declared open defecation free by the coordinating institutions of the Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) program. The areas according to Public Works release are Sackie Town, Gbokolleh Town and Frank Town, all in Careysburg District, Montserrado County. The Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach focuses on igniting a change in hygienic and sanitation behaviors rather than just constructing toilets. The initiation also hopes to see Liberian communities organize themselves in addressing their sanitation needs through collective movement, without subsidies from outside.

CLTS started in Liberia March 30, 2008 and its originated from India by Dr. Kamel Kar, the founder of the organization. The idea was transplanted in Liberia through the instrumentality of UNICEF and the government of Liberia. Since the inception of CLTS in Liberia, about ten (10) communities have been triggered in Todee and Careysburg Districts in Montserrado. CLTS hopes to achieve reduction in water related diseases, community driven in all development initiatives and reduction in environmental pollution.

There are more than fifteen communities in Liberia as a whole trying to obtain ODF status but at present, only three have met the requirements and are going to be certificated during the official launching of the program. The coordinating agencies of CLTS in Liberia are the Ministry of Public Works, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, UNICEF, SODES and FAAL. 

Meanwhile, strategy developed for the Community Led Total Sanitation program will be launched on Saturday, January 23, 2010 in Gbokolleh Town, Careysburg District, Montserrado County.  CLTS according to strategy developed hopes to declare 2010 as “National Year of Sanitation in Liberia.” The program is expected to caption the theme “from the bush to the toilet house-communities decide for themselves.”

Source – http://www.theliberiantimes.com/article_2010_01_21_5831.shtml