Tag Archives: Sanitary napkin

Sanitary Pad Interventions for Girls’ Education in Ghana: A Pilot Study

PLoS ONE, Oct 2012.

Sanitary Pad Interventions for Girls’ Education in Ghana: A Pilot Study

Paul Montgomery, et al.

Background – Increased education of girls in developing contexts is associated with a number of important positive health, social, and economic outcomes for a community. The event of menarche tends to coincide with girls’ transitions from primary to secondary education and may constitute a barrier for continued school attendance and performance. Following the MRC Framework for Complex Interventions, a pilot controlled study was conducted in Ghana to assess the role of sanitary pads in girls’ education.

Methods – A sample of 120 schoolgirls between the ages of 12 and 18 from four villages in Ghana participated in a non-randomized trial of sanitary pad provision with education. The trial had three levels of treatment: provision of pads with puberty education; puberty education alone; or control (no pads or education). The primary outcome was school attendance.

Results – After 3 months, providing pads with education significantly improved attendance among participants, (lambda 0.824, F = 3.760, p<.001). After 5 months, puberty education alone improved attendance to a similar level (M = 91.26, SD = 7.82) as sites where pads were provided with puberty education (Rural M = 89.74, SD = 9.34; Periurban M = 90.54, SD = 17.37), all of which were higher than control (M = 84.48, SD = 12.39). The total improvement through pads with education intervention after 5 months was a 9% increase in attendance. After 3 months, providing pads with education significantly improved attendance among participants. The changes in attendance at the end of the trial, after 5 months, were found to be significant by site over time. With puberty education alone resulting in a similar attendance level.

Conclusion – This pilot study demonstrated promising results of a low-cost, rapid-return intervention for girls’ education in a developing context. Given the considerable development needs of poorer countries and the potential of young women there, these results suggest that a large-scale cluster randomized trial is warranted.

WASHplus Weekly – Focus on Menstrual Hygiene Management

Issue 65 August 3, 2012 | Focus on Menstrual Hygiene Management

This issue updates the October 28, 2011, weekly on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) with 2012 resources and information. These include a WEDC MHM fact sheet, an update on PATH MHM projects, and recent news items. Country studies from Bangladesh, Iran, Kenya, and others are also referenced.

EDUCATION/CONFERENCES

PhD in Menstrual Hygiene Management at WEDC, Loughborough University(More information)
 The Water, Engineering and Development Center (WEDC) is exploring the possibility of supporting a student to carry out PhD research related to MHM. In some exceptional cases, funding for international students may be considered under the WEDC scholarship program.

Conference on Exploring Menstruation Hygiene Management Practices, September 27, 2012. (Registration information)
A joint conference between UNICEF and Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health will review the range of MHM approaches being initiated or implemented at the research, program, and policy levels, and share lessons learned to date with the broader WASH in Schools community around the world.

FACT SHEETS/REPORTS

Developing an Affordable Sanitary Pad, 2012. PATH. (Link)
PATH’s solution is to develop and advance low-cost menstrual management options for girls and women in low-resource settings. Findings from focus group discussions and literature reviews indicate that girls and women are interested in disposable products that offer better absorbency and have a cheaper price tag than available options. The paper also discusses reusable options (cloth pads and menstrual cups) that can last for several years.

Managing Menstrual Hygiene in Emergency Situations: How Far from Reality?2012. D Wickramasinghe.  (Full text, pdf)
This paper explores the issue of MHM in emergency situations. It also discusses common obstacles that are encountered in promoting effective and hygienic menstrual practices in disaster relief programs. Learning from the tsunami relief activities in 2004, this article describes strategic actions to build capacity and develop processes to respond to the needs of menstruating women.

Menstruation Hygiene Management for Schoolgirls in Low-Income Countries, 2012. WEDC.  (Full text, pdf)
This fact sheet outlines the problems experienced by menstruating schoolgirls in low-income countries. The fact sheet also evaluates simple solutions to these problems including the use of low-cost sanitary pads and suggests ways in which MHM can be included in water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) programs.

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Link

PATH – Developing an Affordable Sanitary Pad

Developing an Affordable Sanitary Pad

PATH’s solution is to develop and advance low-cost menstrual management options for girls and women in low-resource settings. Our finding from focus group discussions and literature reviews indicate that girls and women are
interested in disposable products that offer better absorbency and have a cheaper price tag than available options. There are also reusable options (cloth pads and menstrual cups) that can last for several years. These approaches require a higher up-front cost, access to clean water and soap, and thorough drying—resources that are not always available in poor communities. We are  currently exploring a hybrid concept (i.e., a combination of a reusable, fluidresistant sleeve with a disposable, absorbent core) to address the growing challenge of disposing of plastic-lined pads and to reduce the cost. This hybrid option could also offer girls and women the flexibility of using a variety of
absorbent materials that are available to them.