Recent WASH research – July 18, 2017

WASHwatch – Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Maps – Projections of use of basic and safely managed sanitation 2000-2030. These maps have been produced by the WASHwatch team, based on data from WHO/UNICEF’s 2017 Progress Report on Drinking Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene. All data points after 2015 are WASHwatch calculations using the average rates of progress between 2000 and 2015.

Household sanitation is associated with lower risk of bacterial and protozoal enteric infections, but not viral infections and diarrhoea, in a cohort study in a low-income urban neighbourhood in Vellore, India. TMIH, July 17, 2017. The presence of a household toilet was associated with lower risk of bacterial and protozoal enteric infections, but not diarrhoea or viral infections, suggesting the health effects of sanitation may be more accurately estimated using outcome measures that account for aetiologic agents.

Identifying behavioural determinants for interventions to increase handwashing practices among primary school children in rural Burundi and urban Zimbabwe. BMC Research Notes, July 14, 2017. This article presents the development of a school handwashing programme in two different sub-Saharan countries that applies the RANAS (risk, attitudes, norms, ability, and self-regulation) systematic approach to behaviour change.

Sanitation practices and perceptions in Kakuma refugee camp, Kenya: Comparing the status quo with a novel service-based approach. PLoS One, July 13, 2017. This study used qualitative and quantitative methods to design, implement, and pilot a novel sanitation system in Kakuma refugee camp, Kenya. An initial round of 12 pre-implementation focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with Dinka and Somali residents to understand sanitation practices, perceptions, and needs.

Menstrual hygiene management among Bangladeshi adolescent schoolgirls and risk factors affecting school absence: results from a cross-sectional survey. BMJ Open, July 2017. Risk factors for school absence included girl’s attitude, misconceptions about menstruation, insufficient and inadequate facilities at school, and family restriction.

Assessing development assistance for child survival between 2000 and 2014: A multi-sectoral perspective. PLoS One, July 11, 2017. Aid for water and sanitation grew from 4.17 billion ($0.86 per capita) in 2000 to 7.27 billion ($1.23 per capita) in 2014 with an average annual growth rate of 5.0%. During this period, the top 10 countries received largest amount of aid (India, China, Viet Nam, Iraq, Morocco, Tanzania, Bangladesh, Jordan, Indonesia, and Ethiopia) accounted for 35% of total aid in water and sanitation (S8 Table), and nine of them were Countdown countries.

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