Recent WASH research – July 20, 2017

OPEN ACCESS

Assessment of Fecal Exposure Pathways in Low-Income Urban Neighborhoods in Accra, Ghana: Rationale, Design, Methods, and Key Findings of the SaniPath Study. AJTMH, July 17, 2017.
The study results highlight widespread and often high levels of fecal contamination in the public and private domains and food supply. The dominant fecal exposure pathway for young children in the household was through consumption of uncooked produce. The SaniPath Study provides critical information on exposure to fecal contamination in low-income, urban environments and ultimately can inform investments and policies to reduce these public health risks.

Women still carry most of the world’s water. The Conversation, July 16, 2017.
In this article, Bethany Caruso of Emory University discusses her research in India, Bolivia and Kenya on the water and sanitation challenges that women and girls confront and how these experiences influence their lives.

Decision-making on shared sanitation in the informal settlements of Kisumu, Kenya. International Journal of Environmental Health Research, July 13, 2017.
Using a grounded theory approach, landlords and tenants were interviewed to identify sanitation decisions, individuals involved in decision-making and factors influencing decision-making. The results indicate that the main sanitation decisions are on investment, emptying, repair and cleaning. Sanitation interventions in informal settlements should thus, target landlords and tenants, with investment efforts being directed at landlords and maintenance efforts at tenants.

ABSTRACT/ORDER

The effect of young children’s faeces disposal practices on child growth: Evidence from 34 countries. TMIH, July 16, 2017.
Improved child faeces disposal practices could achieve greater reductions in child undernutrition than improving toilet access alone. Additionally, the common classification of child faeces disposal as ‘safe’ regardless of the type of toilet used for disposal may underestimate the benefits of disposal in an improved toilet and overestimate the benefits of disposal in an unimproved toilet.

Open defecation explains differences in nutritional status between Bengali and tribal children in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh. Ethnicity & Health, July 1, 2017.
We describe differences in linear growth as measured by height-for-age z-score (HAZ) between children from Bengali and tribal populations in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh and examine factors associated with HAZ in both groups. Different responses among Bengali and tribal children to village-level open defecation are an explanatory factor for the difference in HAZ between Bengali and tribal populations. Open defecation may also act a proxy for unmeasured factors such as household environmental conditions and food hygiene.

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