Sanitation boosts health, not stunted growth for Bangladeshi kids

The news article below gives an interesting summary of one of two WASH & nutrition articles just published in Lancet Global Health:

Sanitation boosts health, not stunted growth for Bangladeshi kids. Futurity, Jan 31, 2018. The WASH Benefits Bangladesh trial is one of the first to examine what are known as water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions as a way of improving children’s growth in low-income communities. Children born into housing compounds with improvements in drinking water quality, sanitation, and handwashing infrastructure were not measurably taller after two years compared to those born into compounds with more contamination, a new study suggests. Although children who received the interventions were significantly healthier overall, and despite mounting research over the last decade linking poor sanitation to stunted growth in children, sanitation improvements seemingly did nothing to improve growth and development.

Effects of water quality, sanitation, handwashing, and nutritional interventions on diarrhoea and child growth in rural Bangladesh: a cluster randomised controlled trial. Lancet Global Health, Jan 29, 2018. Nutrient supplementation and counselling modestly improved linear growth, but there was no benefit to the integration of water, sanitation, and handwashing with nutrition. Adherence was high in all groups and diarrhoea prevalence was reduced in all intervention groups except water treatment.

Effects of water quality, sanitation, handwashing, and nutritional interventions on diarrhoea and child growth in rural Kenya: a cluster-randomised controlled trial. Lancet Global Health, Jan 28, 2018. Behaviour change messaging combined with technologically simple interventions such as water treatment, household sanitation upgrades from unimproved to improved latrines, and handwashing stations did not reduce childhood diarrhoea or improve growth, even when adherence was at least as high as has been achieved by other programmes.

OPEN ACCESS

Sustainable Water Partnership Launces Toolkit# 4: Funding Water Security – Financing can come from government taxes, user tariffs, international aid transfers and private sector investments. The type of water security activity often determines the type of financing that will be most readily available.

Sustained adoption of water, sanitation and hygiene interventions: systematic review. Trop Med Intl Health, Feb 2018.

Preliminary assessment of the computer-based Taenia solium educational program ‘The Vicious Worm’ on knowledge uptake in primary school students in rural areas in eastern Zambia. Trop Med Intl Health, Early view.

Escherichia coli Contamination across Multiple Environmental Compartments (Soil, Hands, Drinking Water, and Handwashing Water) in Urban Harare: Correlations and Risk Factors. Am Jnl Trop Med Hyg, Early view.

A framework for stimulating economic investments to prevent emerging diseases. WHO Bulletin, Feb 2018. One of the co-authors is Daniel Schar of USAID.

ABSTRACT/ORDER

Context matters: a multicountry analysis of individual- and neighbourhood-level factors associated with women’s sanitation use in sub-Saharan Africa. Trop Med Intl Health, Feb 2018. Using data from Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in 14 SSA countries between 2008 and 2014, we modelled women’s sanitation use in relation to various individual- and neighbourhood-level factors.

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