Author Archives: usaidwaterckm

WHO – Achieving quality universal health coverage through better water, sanitation and hygiene services in health care facilities A focus on Cambodia and Ethiopia

Achieving quality universal health coverage through better water, sanitation and hygiene services in health care facilities: A focus on Cambodia and Ethiopia. WHO, December 2017. who-his-sds-2017-17-cover

The WHO/UNICEF Global Action Plan for WASH in HCFs recognises that sustained improvements in WASH in Health Care Facilities require integration between quality of care efforts and WASH. To date, little evidence is available on how such integration occurs at country level.

To address this knowledge gap, WHO has conducted several in-depth situational analysis in countries that are undertaking actions to improve WASH in Health Care Facilities as part of their quality of care improvement efforts.

The purpose of the situation analyses was to capture mechanisms that “jointly support” WASH in HCF and quality of care improvements and also identify barriers and challenges to implementing and sustaining these improvements.

Webinar – Contribution of Community-Led Total Sanitation to Ending Open Defecation: Findings of a Desk Review

Webinar – Contribution of Community-Led Total Sanitation to Ending Open Defecation: Findings of a Desk Review, December 14, 2017. WASHPaLS-email

On Wednesday, December 13, 2017, the USAID-funded Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) Project held a webinar on the role of community-led total sanitation (CLTS) in helping to end open defecation.

WASHPaLS presented key findings from a desk review assessing the knowledge base on CLTS program performance. The findings and identified evidence gaps will inform the WASHPaLS research agenda for subsequent years of the project.

 

Upcoming webinars, new World Bank water utilities toolkit, recent WASH research

WEBINARS

December 13, 2017 – USAID/WASHPaLS webinar on CLTS and open defecation – The USAID-funded Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) Project invites you to a webinar examining how community-led total sanitation (CLTS) has contributed to the goal of ending open defecation.

REPORTS/WEBSITES

Toolkit on the Aggregation of Water Supply and Sanitation Utilities. World Bank, December 8. This report describes the methodology applied and outcomes of the Global Study on WSS Utility Aggregation implemented by the Water Global Practice. The work conducted has allowed providing concrete, evidence-based guidance to policy makers and practitioners regarding when, why, and how water and sanitation utilities can work together (“aggregate”) to successfully deliver specific policy outcomes, such as better services or lower costs.

OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL ARTICLES

‘We do not know’: a qualitative study exploring boys perceptions of menstruation in India. BMC Reproductive Health, December 8. These findings provide some optimism that males can become advocates in moving forward the MHM agenda. The reasons for this are twofold: boys were keen for knowledge about menstruation…

Role, ownership and presence of domestic animals in peri-urban households of Kisumu, Kenya. Zoonoses & Public Health, December 5. This research demonstrates the high prevalence of animal ownership in a low-income and high-density peri-urban neighbourhood of an African city.

Affordability in the provision of water and sanitation services: Evolving strategies and imperatives to realise human rights. International Journal of Water Governance, November 2017. In sum, affordability is attained throughvarious efforts: a coordinated institutional structure, clear legal provisions (i.e. formally recognizing the HRtWS), contextually specific policy and plans, accountable regulatory mechanisms and efficiently organised service providers.

ABSTRACT/ORDER

Moving up the sanitation ladder with the help of microfinance in urban Malawi. Jnl WASH for Dev, December 2017. Organisations seeking to improve access to safely managed sanitation by promoting alternative sanitation technologies would succeed if households have access to affordable alternative sanitation technologies and microfinance for sanitation. However, poorer households would need more affordable improved sanitation technologies, flexible microfinance options and possibly targeted subsidies to gain access to safely managed sanitation

USAID/WASHPaLS webinar on CLTS and open defecation

The USAID-funded Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) Project invites you to a webinar examining how community-led total sanitation (CLTS) has contributed to the goal of ending open defecation.

WASHPaLS will present key findings from a desk review assessing the knowledge base on CLTS program performance. The findings and identified evidence gaps will inform the WASHPaLS research agenda for subsequent years of the project. Please view the invitation below for more information and to register.

washpals.png

Register and learn more: https://www.bigmarker.com/waterckm/WASHPaLs-review

Unleashing Waste-Pickers’ Potential: Supporting Recycling Cooperatives in Santiago de Chile

Unleashing Waste-Pickers’ Potential: Supporting Recycling Cooperatives in Santiago de Chile. World Development, Volume 101, January 2018, Pages 293-310.

Highlights

  • Waste-picker performance is affected by the policy environment in which they operate.
  • Traditional policies that repress waste-pickers systematically hurt their collection rates, wages, and working conditions.
  • Governmental support improves the performance of waste-pickers by increasing their economic, social, and environmental outcomes.
  • Inexpensive policy measures working toward a more organized picture of waste-pickers dramatically increase their sustainable performance.

Our empirical results suggest a positive association between the level of government support and waste-pickers’ sustainable performance. Consequently, further positive government intervention, particularly in supporting a stronger structural organization for the waste-picker recycling system, is advocated as the primary policy recommendation of this paper.

SWaCH Across Bharat Promo Video

SWaCH Across Bharat is a short documentary film that explores the work of the SWaCH Co-operative, (a co-operative of waste pickers in Pune, India).

SWaCH Across Bharat, offers viewers one model of waste management that is not only good for the environment & financially efficient, but also one that safeguards waste-pickers’ rights.

Weaving in reflections of Supriya Bhadakwad (a waste-picker and member of SWaCH Cooperative), Lakshmi Narayan (a founder of SWaCH) and Varsha Chitale (a citizen whose apartment is serviced by SWaCH), the film brings together different perspectives on why the SWaCH model really works.

SWaCH Across Bharat is Directed by Lakshmi Anantnarayan, produced by TERI and supported by the Films Division, Ministry of Information & Broadcasting, Government of India.

Unpaid and undervalued, how India’s waste pickers fight apathy to keep our cities clean

Unpaid and undervalued, how India’s waste pickers fight apathy to keep our cities clean. The News Minute, November 30, 2017.

There are an estimated 1.5 million to 4 million waste pickers in India, who pick up, clean, sort and segregate recyclable waste and sell it further up the value chain. wastepickers

Shoba Bansode has been working as a waste picker in Pune for over 15 years. She started doing this for a living since nobody would give her work as a domestic worker.

“My son was also very small then, and citing that reason too, nobody would give me work in their households.

At that time, one of my friends taught me waste picking. Using this as my only source of livelihood, I was able to provide for my child and raise him,” she says.

Shoba’s case is not an exception. Waste picking (or rag picking as it is commonly called) is a job that many end up in due to lack of other options.

According to a study published in the International Research Journal of Environment Sciences, titled, Studies on the Solid Waste Collection by Rag Pickers at Greater Hyderabad Municipal Corporation, India, 94% of the 150 waste pickers interviewed in the Jawahar Nagar landfill in Hyderabad, stated that they chose this job since there were no other alternatives available to them.

Read the complete article.