Author Archives: usaidwaterckm

Recent WASH research on water security, handwashing, intermittent water supply

Water Security Planning: Toolkit #3. Sustainable Water Partnership, 2018. Toolkit #3 discusses how to prepare a water security action plan. Future toolkits will discuss funding, implementation and the monitoring and evaluation of water security plans.

WaSH Policy Research Digest, ISSUE #7: INTERMITTENT WATER SUPPLY. UNC Water Institute, January 2018. Longer term approaches must address the systematic problems, such as high water losses and poor management, that result in intermittent supply. Continuous water supply is achievable and should be one of the aims of any program of utility reform.

Comparing the behavioural impact of a nudge-based handwashing intervention to high-intensity hygiene education: a cluster-randomised trial in rural Bangladesh. TMIH, January 2018. Our trial demonstrates sustained improved handwashing behaviour 5 months after the nudge intervention.

Enteric Infections in Young Children are Associated with Environmental Enteropathy and Impaired Growth. TMIH, January 2018. Enteric infections were significantly associated with EE and impaired growth in rural Bangladesh. These findings provide further evidence to support the hypothesis that contaminated soil in child play spaces can lead to enteric infections, many of which are likely subclinical, resulting in EE and impaired growth in young children.

Menstrual health and school absenteeism among adolescent girls in Uganda (MENISCUS): a feasibility study. BMC Women’s Health, January 2018. In this peri-urban Ugandan population, menstruation was strongly associated with school attendance. Evaluation of a menstrual management intervention that address both psychosocial (e.g. self-confidence, attitudes) and physical (e.g. management of pain, use of adequate menstrual hygiene materials, improved water and sanitation facilities) aspects of menstruation are needed.

Can Escherichia coli fly? The role of flies as transmitters of E. coli to food in an urban slum in Bangladesh. TMIH, January 2018. Flies may transmit large quantities of E. coli to food under field settings.

The influence of maternal psychosocial circumstances and physical environment on the risk of severe wasting in rural Gambian infants: a mixed methods approach. BMC Public Health, January 2018. In rural Gambia, inappropriate infant feeding practices were associated with severe wasting in infants.

Innovations in WASH Impact Measures: Water and Sanitation Measurement Technologies and Practices to Inform the Sustainable Development Goals. World Bank, 2018.

Gendered Experiences of Adaptation to Drought: Patterns of Change in El Sauce, Nicaragua. Latin American Research Review, 2017. These gendered inequalities in access to and control over different forms of capital has led to a gender-differentiated capacity to respond to climate change, men being able to adapt and women experiencing a downward spiral in capacity and increasing vulnerability to drought.

CLTS Knowledge Hub seeking a consultant to to carry out a desk-based review on the topic of Sanitation, Men and Boys

The CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS is seeking a consultant to to carry out a desk-based review on the topic of Sanitation, Men and Boys. clts2

The purpose of this review is to explore the other side of gender – men and boys, in sanitation and hygiene.

Whilst discussions around gender in WASH (and elsewhere) often focus on the roles, positions or impacts on women and girls, we are curious to explore how men and boys are/are not engaged in efforts to improve sanitation and change social norms, and how they can or need to be targeted to make efforts more successful.

Only when women and men are equally and meaningfully involved in sanitation and hygiene programs, can they result in positive lasting change.

Our main aims for this review are to:

  • Explore how men and boys can be more meaningfully engaged in the WASH process to achieve sustainable behaviour change and a new social norm.
  • See what specific approaches and methods may be needed and are being used in different contexts to stop men and boys from practicing OD.
  • Gain a deeper understanding of power dynamics, relationships and roles and responsibilities within households and communities when it comes to sanitation and hygiene, and how these impact on long term sustainability.

Additional information

USAID webinar – Women in Waste Management: An Opportunity

Webinar: Women in Waste Management: An Opportunity

USAID’s E3/Urban Team invites you to join us for an online panel discussion on January 17 to discuss women’s role in waste management. webinar

Women in Asia play a central role in environmental management, yet their work in the sector is often unpaid or underpaid.

This Urban-Links webinar will discuss:

  • Key constraints for women’s empowerment and job creation in the solid waste management sector;
  • What models work and how do we know they work. What metrics are NGO’s and donors using to measure the empowerment of women in the solid waste management sector;
  • How can grant-making under the USAID-funded Municipal Waste Recycling Program empower women in the sector.

Moderators

  • Clare Romanik, Senior Urban Specialist with USAID’s Office of Land and Urban
  • Marianne Carliez Gillet, Director of Global Program Management for the Development Innovations Group

Panelists

  • Ly Nguyen, Founder and Director of the Center for Environment and Community Research in Vietnam
  • Dr. Vella Atizenza, Assistant Professor at the College of Public Affairs and Development, University of the Philippines at Los Banos

Webinar Information

 

CLTS Knowledge Hub support to attend the 2018 WEDC conference in Kenya

The CLTS Knowledge Hub is pleased to announce that we have funding available to support a small number of early career practitioners and/or researchers to attend and present at the 41st WEDC International Conference 9-13 July 2018 at Egerton University, Nakuru, Kenya. clts

The funding will cover all costs related to conference registration, travel, accommodation and food. The theme of this year’s conference is Transformation towards sustainable and resilient WASH services.

Those selected will be expected to write a paper and present it at the conference, attend the CLTS Knowledge Hub’s pre-conference Sharing and Learning Workshop on July 8th, help support the Hub’s CLTS related stall throughout the week and write a blog about their experience and reflections from the conference.

For more information on criteria and how to apply, please see http://www.communityledtotalsanitation.org/story/support-early-career-researchers-attend-wedc-conference-2018

 

Innovations in WASH Impact Measures : Water and Sanitation Measurement Technologies and Practices to Inform the Sustainable Development Goals

Innovations in WASH Impact Measures: Water and Sanitation Measurement Technologies and Practices to Inform the Sustainable Development Goals. World Bank, January 2018. worldbank.jpg

The new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development includes water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) at its core. A dedicated Sustainable Development Goal (SDG 6) declares a commitment to “ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.”

Monitoring progress toward this goal will be challenging: direct measures of water and sanitation service quality and use are either expensive or elusive. However, reliance on household surveys poses limitations and likely overstated progress during the Millennium Development Goal period.

In Innovations in WASH Impact Measures: Water and Sanitation Measurement Technologies and Practices to Inform the Sustainable Development Goals, we review the landscape of proven and emerging technologies, methods, and approaches that can support and improve on the WASH indicators proposed for SDG target 6.1, “by 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all,” and target 6.2, “by 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations.”

Although some of these technologies and methods are readily available, other promising approaches require further field evaluation and cost reductions. Emergent technologies, methods, and data-sharing platforms are increasingly aligned with program impact monitoring.

Improved monitoring of water and sanitation interventions may allow more cost-effective and measurable results. In many cases, technologies and methods allow more complete and impartial data in time to allow program improvements. Of the myriad monitoring and evaluation methods, each has its own advantages and limitations.

Surveys, ethnographies, and direct observation give context to more continuous and objective electronic sensor data. Overall, combined methodologies can provide a more comprehensive and instructive depiction of WASH usage and help the international development community measure our progress toward reaching the SDG WASH goals.

Gender & WASH – Water Currents, December 21, 2017

Gender & WASH – Water Currents, December 21, 2017

Women and girls are disproportionately affected by lack of access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services. Their needs differ from men in terms of sanitation, they spend more of their time collecting water, yet they have less say about household and community decisions made on WASH services. gender

Similarly, women throughout the developing world face different barriers than men in terms of their involvement in WASH-related professions, such as utility management.

This issue on gender and WASH focuses on a new batch of reports, journal articles, and podcasts and provides links to relevant websites and news articles that consider gender issues in the WASH sector and gender-related aspects of agricultural water management.

We are always looking for ideas and suggestions to make Water Currents more useful and relevant, so we would appreciate your responses to this brief survey.

Water and Gender

The Rising Tide: A New Look at Water and GenderThe World Bank, August 2017. Water-related societal roles often reflect, and even reinforce, gender inequality. This report discusses the consequences of some water initiatives—intended and unintended—for gender equality. It makes the important point that gender inequality does not always show up where we might expect.

Gender-Responsive Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Key Elements for Effective WASH ProgrammingUNICEF, March 2017. Effective gender-responsive programming in the WASH sector can contribute to gender equality while yielding important WASH results. This document outlines essential elements that WASH practitioners should take into account to enhance a gender-responsive approach to their work.

Gender Equality and Disability Inclusion within Water, Sanitation and HygieneWaterAid, March 2017. This discussion paper is based on WaterAid’s experiences in applying integrated gender and disability support to rights-based WASH programs in Timor-Leste and Papua New Guinea.

Read the complete issue.

Recent WASH research and resources

In addition to the items below, there are also new blog posts and resources on the Globalwaters.org website.

ORGANIZATONS

  • Menstrual Health Hub (MH Hub) – is a global and interdisciplinary Community of Practice (CoP) for menstrual health actors and practitioners.

OPEN ACCESS