Author Archives: usaidwaterckm

CLTS studies/resources on CLTS/men & boys, CLTS and children learning brief and more

Below are excerpts from the latest newsletter from IDS Community-Led Total Sanitation:

If you missed our recent webinar, ‘The Other Side of Gender – Sanitation, Men and Boys’, on how men and boys can be more meaningfully engaged in sanitation and hygiene processes to achieve sustainable behaviour change and a new social norms, you can watch it here. The PowerPoint presentation can also be downloaded hereHUB_logo

You can also watch this interesting short interview where Daniel Kitasian Sironka (County Public Health Officer, Narok County Government) talks about his experiences in engaging pastoralist men and boys in community sanitation in Kenya.

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USAID  Desk Review on Market-Based Rural Sanitation Development Programs

Below is the link to the release of a new USAID desk review prepared under the Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS):

 Desk Review on Market-Based Rural Sanitation Development Programs.

 The USAID/WASHPaLS project prepared a desk review that investigates the current state of knowledge in market-based sanitation (MBS) and establishes a framework to analyze, design, and improve MBS interventions. This report is based on a survey of approximately 600 documents on MBS, in-depth research into 13 MBS intervention case studies across the global south, and interviews with sector experts and program personnel. usaidlogo

This review offers a framework that draws upon and contributes to existing evidence across the three crucial challenges to scaling MBS—appropriate product and business model choices, viability of sanitation enterprises, and difficulty of unlocking public and private financing for sanitation. It also helps funders and implementers design, analyze, and improve MBS interventions and offers guidance for stakeholders and governments interested in using sanitation markets to expand sanitation coverage and reduce open defecation. In addition, this review highlights the larger contextual parameters that determine the applicability of MBS within a given market.

This review was made possible by contributions from Rishi Agarwal, Subhash Chennuri, and Aaron Mihaly (FSG); Dr. Jeff Albert (Aquaya); Dr. Mimi Jenkins (University of California, Davis); Morris Israel (Tetra Tech); Hannah Taukobong (Iris Group, Inc.); Elizabeth Jordan and Jesse Shapiro (USAID); and others.

WASH research update on handwashing, CLTS and other topics – May 31, 2018.

Effect of hygiene interventions on acute respiratory infections in childcare, school and domestic settings in low‐ and middle‐income countries: a systematic review. TMIH, May 2018. Evidence suggests that hand hygiene interventions delivered in childcare, school and domestic settings can reduce ARI morbidity, but effectiveness varies according to setting, intervention target, and intervention compliance.

Is Community-Led Total Sanitation connected to the rebuilding of latrines? Quantitative evidence from Mozambique. PLoS One, May 22. Logistic regression and mediation analyses reveal that latrine rebuilding depends on education, soil conditions, social cohesion, and a feeling of being safe from diarrhea, the perception that many other community members own a latrine, and high confidence in personal ability to repair or rebuild a broken latrine.

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Recent Ebola research – May 30, 2018 updates

We will periodically update this page with Ebola research studies:

May 30, 2018 Updates 

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Photo from the World Health Organization

A Method to Test the Efficacy of Handwashing for the Removal of Emerging Infectious Pathogens. Marlene K. Wolfe and Daniele S. Lantagne, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tufts University, June 2017.

Selection of a Biosafety Level 1 (BSL-1) surrogate to evaluate surface disinfection efficacy in Ebola outbreaks: Comparison of four bacteriophages. PLoS One, May 2017.

Surface Cleaning and Disinfection: Efficacy Assessment of Four Chlorine Types Using Escherichia coli and the Ebola Surrogate Phi6. Environmental Science & Technology, March 2017.

Handwashing and Ebola virus disease outbreaks: A randomized comparison of soap, hand sanitizer, and 0.05% chlorine solutions on the inactivation and removal of model organisms Phi6 and E. coli from hands and persistence in rinse water. PLoS One, February 2017.

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Ebola in the News

This page will feature recent news articles on the Ebola outbreak:

May 29, 2018 Updates

ebola-drc-fever-control

Photo from the World Health Organization

Children must be at heart of response to Ebola outbreak – Democratic …
4 days ago – Children must be at heart of response to Ebola outbreak News and Press … the risk of transmission in schools, including temperature taking and handwashing.”.

Ebola: How this virus sparked a global health revolution – CNN
3 days ago – “There are two defining epidemics of our time: the AIDS epidemic and Ebola,” said Peter Piot, director at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Past use of disinfectants and PPE for Ebola could inform future …
5 days ago – Data from the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak at two Sierra Leone facilities reveal daily … strictwatersanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and infection prevention control …

Ebola | Ebola virus disease – World Health Organization
3 days ago – Ebola virus disease website: fact sheet, technical guidance, news. … WHO supports Ebolavaccination of high risk populations in the Democratic Republic of the …

What we know about fighting Ebola: A Q&A with expert Dr. Adam …
6 days ago – The global health community is better prepared to face the largest outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease since the 2014-2016 West African epidemic claimed more …

Ebola outbreak in the DR Congo: lessons learned – The Lancet
4 days ago – The Ebola virus outbreak appears to have started in the remote western DR … instructs residents on hand washing as a preventive measure against Ebola in …

Map of the Day: Every Historic Ebola Outbreak in the Democratic …
6 days ago – Today’s map comes from the World Health Organization, which released this graphic to help put into context the current ebola outbreak in the Democratic …

 

 

 

Examining the Sustainability of USAID’s Millennium Water Alliance Activity in Ethiopia

Examining the Sustainability of USAID’s Millennium Water Alliance Activity in Ethiopia

The USAID Water Office hosted a webinar on May 17, 2018, “Examining Sustainability of USAID’s Millennium Water Alliance Activity in Ethiopia.” mwa-ethiopia-webinar-2

The webinar presented key findings from a soon-to-be released USAID ex-post evaluation of the Millennium Water Alliance-Ethiopia Program (MWA-EP) between 2004 and 2009 in 24 rural woredas (districts) of Ethiopia.

Overview and meta-analysis of global water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) impact evaluations – World Bank

Overview and meta-analysis of global water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) impact evaluations. World Bank, May 2018.

This paper presents an overview and meta-analysis of the effects of water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions around the world. It is based on 136 impact evaluations (randomized and quasi-experimental studies) that explore the effects of water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions on health and non-health outcomes, ranging from behavior change — such as the adoption of water treatment — to school attendance rates, to a reduction in diarrhea.

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The selected impact evaluations were divided into five groups, and meta-regressions with fixed effects (at the regional level) and random effects were performed, controlling for each study’s characteristics (implementing organization, sample sizes, type of publication, number of publication views, and so forth). All results are reported as changes in odds ratios, with respect to the standard deviation of reported effects.

Water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions were found to increase the likelihood of behavior changes and the adoption of new hygiene practices by 17 percent. The smallest effects were observed from water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions aimed at reducing the rates of child mortality and non-diarrheal disease.

Water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions implemented in schools showed statistically significant results in reducing school absenteeism and dropouts. Similarly, the results showed a statistically significant aggregate likelihood of increased access to safe water and improved water quality, as well as increased water treatment options — a difference of one-fifth with respect to the standard deviation of the average effect size reported.

Finally, the results showed that water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions reduced the likelihood of the incidence of diarrheal and enteric disease by 13 percent, which is consistent with findings in other meta-analyses of the same subject