Author Archives: WSSCC

WASH champions celebrated at AfricaSan Awards

Originally posted on wsscc:

Photo: Alma Felic/WSSCC Photo: Alma Felic/WSSCC


By Okechukwu Umelo

For a minute, I thought I was attending the Oscars or Grammys. The 2015 AfricaSan awards, held at the King Fahd Palace in Dakar on 26 May, was a night of glitz and glamour. A red carpet was rolled out to welcome participants who enjoyed a gala dinner and vibrant music and theater performances from local artists.

Photo: Alma Felic/WSSCC Photo: Alma Felic/WSSCC

But all the fanfare was for a very worthy cause: to celebrate water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) leaders who have made major strides and broken down barriers in WASH across Africa.

And the winners are:

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Review of eThekwini commitments at AfricaSan 4: Progress still slow, new commitments expected

Originally posted on wsscc:

Photo: Javier Acebal/WSSCC Photo: Javier Acebal/WSSCC

By Alain Tossounon

Seven years after the commitments made in eThekwini, The African world is meeting in Senegal for the 4th Conference on Sanitation and Hygiene. The meeting in Dakar could be the opportunity for yet another new start. However, the review of the commitments made in Kigali, Rwanda, shows that, although some countries have made significant efforts, others are still lagging behind. A spurt of effort is now needed to ensure universal access to sanitation in all countries on the continent.

In 2008, 45 African countries took up the challenge of prioritizing sanitation to achieve the MDGs. Since then, 42 countries have actually pursued the process of monitoring progress towards fulfilling the commitments made at eThekwini, and over 30 have produced action plans.

Photo: Javier Acebal/WSSCC Mansour Faye, Minister of Water and Sanitation in Senegal, during the opening ceremony of AfricaSan 4. Photo: Javier Acebal/WSSCC

Seven years on, the picture…

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From eThekwini to Ngor: A bumpy road for sanitation

Originally posted on wsscc:

Photo: Javier Acebal/WSSCC Photo: Javier Acebal/WSSCC

By Raphael Mweninguwe in Dakar, Senegal

The road from eThekwini, in South Africa, to Ngor, in Senegal, has been a very rough and bumpy one in as far as improving access to billions of people in Africa is concerned, experts admit.

The eThekwini Declaration was launched in 2008, when African Ministers and experts met to commit themselves to improving the sanitation and hygiene in Africa. Since then little progress has been done.

During the Opening Plenary of the 4th African Conference on Sanitation and Hygiene on Tuesday, Senegalese President Macky Sall said that the road from eThekwini has not been in vain. He pointed out that some achievements have been made, but the road remains bumpy.

President Sall also explained that “as Africa now changes its road map from eThekwini to Ngor, I dont think we will miss another opportunity to have our people fail…

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Engaging communities in Matam, Senegal

Originally posted on wsscc:

By Alma Felic and Okechukwu Umelo

Last week, the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) family, including Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) programme managers and WSSCC National Coordinators, visited rural communities in the region of Matam, Senegal. It was an unprecedented opportunity to engage with communities and hear about their successes and challenges related to water, sanitation and hygiene. Browse through the photos and captions below to learn more.

Achieving ODF status

Photo: Okechukwu Umelo/WSSCC Photo: Okechukwu Umelo/WSSCC

Photo: Okechukwu Umelo/WSSCC Photo: Okechukwu Umelo/WSSCC

The village of Belly Thiowi became open-defecation free (ODF) thanks to efforts led by communities and supported by GSF implementing agencies through behavior change approaches. The first photo shows the situation prior to reaching ODF status – multiple defecation zones are drawn in red between houses and trees. The second photo shows the community after achieving ODF status, with no visible open defecation zones.

Young members of the community are activated to…

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“In this room, we have the answers.” – WSSCC/GSF family gathers for global learning and sharing event

Originally posted on wsscc:

Photo: Okechukwu Umelo/WSSCC Photo: Okechukwu Umelo/WSSCC

By Okechukwu Umelo

“The discussion between you can fertilize thinking,” said Chris Williams, Executive Director of the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) at the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) learning and sharing event in Dakar, Senegal. “In this room, we have the answers,” he continued.

Photo: Alma Felic/WSSCC

The event was held as part of various preparation activities for the fourth AfricaSan conference in Dakar. It gathered GSF programme managers and teams from across the globe, as well as WSSCC national coordinators, implementation partners and sanitation and hygiene specialists within the GSF network, to discuss cross-cutting opportunities and challenges related to implementing GSF programmes.

In his address, Mr. Williams stated:

“How can we support countries to get to that next level? Pure exchanges and technological platforms are key. We have a technological challenge as well as a structural challenge to overcome, so that information is available…

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Nominate now: AfricaSan Awards 2015

AfricaSan-Award-Nominations---post-on-Sanitation-UpdatesAs part of the AfricaSan 4 conference convened by the Government of Senegal from May 25th – 27th, 2015 in Dakar, the African Ministers’ Council on Water (AMCOW) is pleased to invite entries for the AfricaSan Awards 2015.

The awards are dedicated to recognizing outstanding efforts and achievements in sanitation and hygiene in Africa which result in large-scale, sustainable behavior changes and tangible impacts.  The aim is to raise the profile of sanitation and hygiene by drawing attention to successful approaches, promoting excellence in leadership, innovation and sanitation and hygiene improvements in Africa.

The awards are open to all individuals and institutions working in the sanitation and hygiene sector from countries of each award region.

The Technical Committee has streamlined the AfricaSan Awards to cover the critical sectors of the sanitation sector. The 2015 Awards will be in the following categories:

  • RESEARCH & TECHNICAL INNOVATION: to honour individuals and institutions who through research and development have contributed to the improvement of technical solutions for sanitation services and products to make them affordable, reliable, and sustainable.
  • YOUTH AWARD: to honour exceptional youth (under the age of 25) or agencies that promote water and sanitation that affect youth, whose work has/have made a significant impact upon children or youth.
  • LOCAL GOVERNMENT LEADERSHIP AWARD: to honour outstanding local government or utility leadership whose policies or actions have promoted innovation, enhanced capacity, mobilized resources or generally created an enabling environment for improvement in sanitation delivery.
  • HYGIENE AWARD: to be awarded to individuals or agency/business with outstanding initiatives or progress to promote good hygiene in relation to water and sanitation.
  • IMPACT AT SCALE AWARD: presented in recognition of outstanding initiatives with impact at a significant scale (i.e. city-scale; district-scale, country-scale)
  • INTEGRITY AWARD: presented to individuals or agencies that have made extraordinary progress in fighting corruption and improving governance or transparency in sanitation or hygiene service delivery.

To download the nomination forms, visit the AfricaSan website.

Global Sanitation Experts Hail Madagascar Roadmap to become Open-Defecation Free Nation by 2019

madagascar_countrypage_gsf_smallAntananarivo – March 25, 2015 — Today, a high-level delegation of global sanitation and hygiene experts arrived in Madagascar for the biannual Steering Committee meeting of the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), a United Nations body devoted solely to the sanitation and hygiene needs of vulnerable and marginalized people around the world.

During the visit, the Steering Committee will see WSSCC’s Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) programme in Madagascar, locally known as the Fonds d’Appui pour l’Assainissement (FAA), in action. Developed and guided strategically by a diverse group of national stakeholders, the FAA is facilitated by Medical Care Development International (MCDI) and implemented by 30 sub-grantee organisations. It has evolved into a driving force in the national movement to end open defecation, which adversely affects the health, livelihood and educational opportunities for 10 million people in Madagascar and some 1 billion worldwide.

The five-day Steering Committee visit is dedicated to reinforcing the country’s top-level political commitment to a new “National Road Map” for the water, sanitation and hygiene sector that aims to end open defecation (ODF) in Madagascar by 2019. Madagascar’s most senior politicians, including President Hery Rajaonarimampianina, Prime Minister Jean Ravelonarivo, the President of the National Assembly, and Dr. Johanita Ndahimananjara, Minister of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, have committed their support to achieving ODF status.

“Since 2010, Madagascar has made tremendous progress in ensuring access to basic sanitation for the rural population of the country, by introduction and scaling up of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS),” said Dr. Chris W. Williams, Executive Director of WSSCC. “Nearly 1.4 million people now live free of open defecation in over 10,900 communities throughout the country, one of the best examples of how individual and local initiative can lead to collective, transformative change for an entire country.”

The visit also coincides with heightened global awareness of sanitation in 2015. The United Nations Secretary General and Deputy-Secretary General have launched a Call to Action on Sanitation, encouraging global institutions, governments, households, the private sector, NGOs, and Parliamentarians, to eradicate the practice of open defecation.

“FAA has become an important catalyst for the initiation and creation of a national, regional and local movement in favour of eliminating open defecation,” said Dr. Rija Lalanirina Fanomeza, GSF Programme Manager, MCDI. “A wide spectrum of sanitation and hygiene stakeholders in Madagascar are actively collaborating to have maximum impact on the ground.”

Ever since President Rajaonarimampianina’s government came into power in January 2014, sanitation has received special attention, and the need for achieving an open-defecation free Madagascar has been considered inevitable by the highest political leadership of the nation.

During the visit, the delegation will visit villages which are now free of open defecation, and those that are not, in order to gain a firsthand understanding of the how and why people change and sustain their sanitation and hygiene behaviours.