Category Archives: Dignity and Social Development

2015 – The year that embraced menstruation and brought innovation to women world over

2015 – The year that embraced menstruation and brought innovation to women world over. Source: by Binjal Shah, YourStory, Dec 31, 2015.

Every day, 800 million women around the world are experiencing ‘that time of the month.’ You know, they ‘Code Red’. ‘Surrender to the communists’. ‘Take the week off to visit their Aunt Flo’.

mhm

The sad reality of our time even today is that we’d spend more energy coming up with bad puns to talk about our period, instead of utilising it to talk simply, more pronouncedly, more often, and more naturally.

This year, we saw instances of the former as well as the latter.
Here is a summary of the puzzling year that was, and what it will figure in the larger roadmap laid towards fighting the taboos around menstruation.

Read the complete article

Hygiene needs of incontinence sufferers

A desk-based review of how WASH actors can better address the hygiene needs of people living with urinary and/or faecal incontinence in developing countries was conducted with funding from WaterAid UK/SHARE in late 2015.

Incontinence products for men

Incontinence products for men. Illustration from the report

The report outlines what incontinence is and how people generally manage their incontinence, as well as relevant experiences and guidance from within the development and humanitarian spheres (related to incontinence as well as other areas such as menstrual hygiene managemant (MHM) and inclusive WASH). The report also provides recommendations on how to better support the hygiene and WASH needs of those people suffering from incontinence.

Continue reading

Obunga clean up & waste pickers 2014-2015

Combating poverty and building democracy through the co-production of participatory waste management services: The case of Kisumu, Kenya.

A research project by:
The inhabitants of Obunga, Nyalenda and Manyatta
The many waste actors in Kisumu
City of Kisumu
County Government of Kisumu
Kisumu Waste Management Services KWAMS
Jaramogi Oginga Odinga University of Science and Technology JOOUST
Maseno University
University of Victoria
University of Gothenburg
Chalmers University of Technology

Funded by:
The Swedish International Centre for Local Democracy ICLD

UN recognises separate, distinct right to sanitation

On 17 December 2015,  the United Nations General Assembly adopted by consensus a resolution which for the first time recognises the distinction between the human right to water and the human right to sanitation. The resolution also highlights the gender-specific impacts of inadequate services and includes strong language on accountability.

Amnesty International, WASH United and Human Rights Watch issued a statement welcoming this step and the additional clarification of States’ obligations contained in General Assembly resolution 70/169.

In early November 2015, 37 NGOs including the three mentioned above, issued a joint statement in support of the draft resolution.

Joint Statement from Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and WASH United on UN General Assembly Resolution 70/169 on the Human Rights to Water and to Sanitation

Interview with Mr. Léo Heller UN Special Rapporteur on the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation, by Guy Norman

leohellerMr. Léo Heller, special Rapporteur on the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation, talked to PF4WASH about issues such as government budget allocations to WASH, steps towards achieving SDG N. 6 and increasing tax revenue generation.

Mr. Heller, thank you for sharing your time and views with us!

Read the interview here

Plan International – Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability: Indonesia Learning Brief

Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability: Indonesia Learning Brief, 2015. Plan International.

Sanitation Marketing Project in Grobogan District, Indonesia. photo credit to Jonny Crocker

Sanitation Marketing Project in Grobogan District, Indonesia. photo credit to Jonny Crocker

Plan International supports Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) implementation in a number of sub-districts in Indonesia.

In this learning brief, we review the roles of local actors in Plan International Indonesia’s program activities and highlight considerations for scalability, planning, implmentation, and evaluation.

Plan International and other sanitation practitioners can support the national government and local actors by placing more responsibility on sub-district staff to lead triggering, enlisting the added support of village facilitators to lead post-triggering, and scaling up village-based financing mechanisms to sustain CLTS outcomes.

Link to project website: http://waterinstitute.unc.edu/clts/

WASHplus Weekly: Focus on Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS)

Issue 202 | August 14, 2015 | Focus on Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS)

This issue updates the March 6, 2015 Weekly on CLTS. Studies and resources in this issue include a webinar series on what constitutes success for CLTS, new reports from the UNC Water Institute and the Institute of Development Studies, a presentation by Kamal Kar on CLTS and scaling up, and a UNICEF report on CLTS in fragile and insecure contexts. Also included are recent studies on the health impacts of open defecation in India and Nepal and a Waterlines review on the safety of burial or disposal with garbage as forms of child feces disposal.

EVENTS

What Constitutes Success for CLTS? Measuring Community Outcomes and Behavior Changes, 2015.
The webinar had a chat show format where, following a panel interview, the audience will have the chance to interact with the panelists. This webinar was organized under the Knowledge Management initiative of the Building Demand for Sanitation (BDS) program of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Organizers included Euforic Services, the SuSanA secretariat and the Stockholm Environment Institute.

  • Introduction by Pippa Scott, Link to recording on YouTube
  • Chat show. Speakers: Ada Oko Williams, Technical Support Manager, Sanitation and Hygiene, WaterAid UK; Darren Saywell, Senior Director, Water, Sanitation and Health, Plan International USA and others, Link
  • Feedback from breakout rooms, Link
  • Closing panel, Link
  • More information and links to audio files are available on the SuSanA discussion forum

Seminar: CLTS at Stockholm World Water Week, August 23rd, 9:00 – 10:30, FH 202. Link
In this 90-minute event, speakers from Plan International and the Water Institute at UNC will discuss with the audience the results of an operational research program on the role and potential of local actors to sustain CLTS outcomes. Highlights will be shared from activities in 10 countries across Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean.

Continue reading