Category Archives: Dignity and Social Development

BBC News – Menstruating girls banned from crossing Ghana river

Menstruating girls banned from crossing Ghana river. BBC News, January 11, 2018.

Ghanaian schoolgirls have been banned from crossing a river while they are menstruating – and on Tuesdays.

menstrualhygiene

Girls living near Kyekyewerein (not pictured) are affected by the ban

The ban, apparently given by a local river god, has outraged children’s activists, especially as girls must cross the river to reach school.

It means girls in the Upper Denkyira East district, in the Central Region, could miss out on their education.

Sub-Saharan Africa is already struggling to keep girls in school during their periods.

The UN’s scientific and education organisation, Unesco, estimates one in 10 girls in the region does not attend school because they are menstruating, while a World Bank report notes that 11.5m Ghanaian women lack the appropriate hygiene and sanitation management facilities needed.

Read the complete article.

USAID webinar – Women in Waste Management: An Opportunity

Webinar: Women in Waste Management: An Opportunity

USAID’s E3/Urban Team invites you to join us for an online panel discussion on January 17 to discuss women’s role in waste management. webinar

Women in Asia play a central role in environmental management, yet their work in the sector is often unpaid or underpaid.

This Urban-Links webinar will discuss:

  • Key constraints for women’s empowerment and job creation in the solid waste management sector;
  • What models work and how do we know they work. What metrics are NGO’s and donors using to measure the empowerment of women in the solid waste management sector;
  • How can grant-making under the USAID-funded Municipal Waste Recycling Program empower women in the sector.

Moderators

  • Clare Romanik, Senior Urban Specialist with USAID’s Office of Land and Urban
  • Marianne Carliez Gillet, Director of Global Program Management for the Development Innovations Group

Panelists

  • Ly Nguyen, Founder and Director of the Center for Environment and Community Research in Vietnam
  • Dr. Vella Atizenza, Assistant Professor at the College of Public Affairs and Development, University of the Philippines at Los Banos

Webinar Information

 

Gender & WASH – Water Currents, December 21, 2017

Gender & WASH – Water Currents, December 21, 2017

Women and girls are disproportionately affected by lack of access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services. Their needs differ from men in terms of sanitation, they spend more of their time collecting water, yet they have less say about household and community decisions made on WASH services. gender

Similarly, women throughout the developing world face different barriers than men in terms of their involvement in WASH-related professions, such as utility management.

This issue on gender and WASH focuses on a new batch of reports, journal articles, and podcasts and provides links to relevant websites and news articles that consider gender issues in the WASH sector and gender-related aspects of agricultural water management.

We are always looking for ideas and suggestions to make Water Currents more useful and relevant, so we would appreciate your responses to this brief survey.

Water and Gender

The Rising Tide: A New Look at Water and GenderThe World Bank, August 2017. Water-related societal roles often reflect, and even reinforce, gender inequality. This report discusses the consequences of some water initiatives—intended and unintended—for gender equality. It makes the important point that gender inequality does not always show up where we might expect.

Gender-Responsive Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Key Elements for Effective WASH ProgrammingUNICEF, March 2017. Effective gender-responsive programming in the WASH sector can contribute to gender equality while yielding important WASH results. This document outlines essential elements that WASH practitioners should take into account to enhance a gender-responsive approach to their work.

Gender Equality and Disability Inclusion within Water, Sanitation and HygieneWaterAid, March 2017. This discussion paper is based on WaterAid’s experiences in applying integrated gender and disability support to rights-based WASH programs in Timor-Leste and Papua New Guinea.

Read the complete issue.

Sanitation experts review Bollywood’s “Toilet: A Love Story”

This is the score CAWST’s sanitation experts gave for the Bollywood film Toilet: Ek Prem Katha or Toilet: A Love Story, which they reviewed for World Toilet Day.  Read the full review by CAWST Communications and Engagement Officer Holly Claeys.

Toilet Design 

Role of Government 

Fecal Sludge Management 

Behaviour Change 

Developing Competencies 

Handwashing 

 

WSSCC, World Bank and Partners Call for Inclusive Sanitation

WSSCC, World Bank and Partners Call for Inclusive Sanitation. IISD SDG Knowledge Hub, September 26, 2017.  iisd-logo

Highlights

  • The WSSCC commissioned an independent study, which finds that disadvantaged individuals, including those with mental health and addiction issues, sex workers, and people with disabilities, lack equitable access to sanitation services.
  • The UN released a series of videos to promote awareness of the human right to water and sanitation.
  • The World Bank, with other development agencies, issued a call for city-wide inclusive sanitation.

September 2017: A Water Supply Sanitation and Collaborative Council (WSSCC) independent study has found that disadvantaged individuals, including those with mental health and addiction issues, sex workers, and people with disabilities, lack equitable access to sanitation services.

In parallel, the UN has released a series of videos to promote awareness of the human right to water and sanitation, while the World Bank and other development agencies have issued a joint call for city-wide inclusive sanitation.

The WSSCC study was based on a document review and assessment of WSSCC programmes in six countries – Ethiopia, Malawi, Nepal, Nigeria, Senegal and Togo.

Read the complete article.

Equality and non-discrimination (EQND) in sanitation programmes at scale (part 1)

Equality and non-discrimination (EQND) in sanitation programmes at scale (part 1 of 2), August 2017Frontiers10coverSarah House, Sue Cavill and Suzanne Ferron. CLTS Knowledge Hub.

A well-facilitated Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programme that pro-actively considers and involves people who might be disadvantaged has been shown to have many benefits.  A lack of this can and will often have negative impacts and make programmes and ODF unsustainable.

This issue of Frontiers of CLTS looks at who should be considered potentially disadvantaged, how they can effectively participate and what may be needed to address diverse needs in order to make processes and outcomes sustainable and inclusive.

Using a range of examples from GSF programmes that were part of a recent study on Equality and Non-Discrimination, it explores the challenges that may occur and concludes with suggested good practices that will strengthen the processes to the benefit of all.

WSSCC Releases New Global Sanitation Fund Equality and Non-Discrimination Study

How can WASH programmes leave no one behind, as called for in the Sustaionable Development Goals? WSSCC’s new study, Scoping and Diagnosis of the Global Sanitation Fund’s Approach to Equality and Non-Discrimination, helps answer this question.

The study reveals that many people who may be considered disadvantaged have benefited positively from WSSCC’s Global Sanitation Fund (GSF)-supported programmes, particularly in open defecation free verified areas. In addition, a range of positive outcomes and impacts related to empowerment, safety, convenience, ease of use, self-esteem, health, dignity, an improved environment and income generation were reported by people who may be considered disadvantaged.

EQND-Article-Slider
Photo Credit: WSSCC

However, the study finds that GSF has not yet systematically integrated EQND throughout the programme cycle. Across all countries, there are people who have either fallen through the net or whose lives have become more difficult after being unduly pressured, or after taking out loans and selling assets to build toilets. More proactive attention is needed throughout the programme cycle to build on current successes and ensure that people are not left behind or harmed through the actions or omissions of supported programmes.

GSF is in the process of putting the study’s recommendations into practice through revised guidelines, minimum standards, practical tools and other mechanisms.

Download the full study, plus a summarized version with GSF reflections, and annexes