Category Archives: Dignity and Social Development

Campaign uses “Slum Britain art” for fundraising

Slums encroach on Buckingham Palace - still from Practical Action video

Slums encroach on Buckingham Palace – still from Practical Action video

A UK charity has set images of iconic landmarks like Buckingham Palace in typical South Asian slums for its latest campaign to tackle urban poverty. Practical Action’s Safer Cities Christmas appeal aims to provide clean water, sanitation and safe housing to over 4,000 poor people in Nepal and Bangladesh. The appeal is backed by the government’s UK Aid Match initiative which matches public donations pound for pound. UK Aid Match will award up to £120 million (US$ 200 million) in grants over 3 years.

Source: Practical Action, 20 Dec 2013 ; The Independent, 22 Dec 2013

WASHplus Weekly: Community-Led Total Sanitation

Issue 126 December 13, 2013 | Focus on Community-Led Total Sanitation

This issue updates the May 2013 Weekly on CLTS with more recent reports and other resources. Included are presentations from a sanitation workshop in Benin, reviews of CLTS successes and shortcomings, a UNICEF overview of CLTS in Asia and the Pacific, a video on school-led total sanitation in Nepal, among others. weekly

REVIEWS

Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability: Systematic Literature Review (Grey Literature), 2012. V Venkataramanan. (Full text)
This study presents findings from a systematic literature review on the effectiveness and impact of CLTS programs. This document was prepared by The Water Institute at UNC for Plan International USA as part of the project Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Community-Led Total Sanitation in Africa: Helpdesk Report, 2013. Health & Education Advice & Resource Team (HEART). (Full text)
Decreases in diarrhea, cholera, and skin infections were the main health outcomes reported in this study. However, methodological weaknesses, including the lack of clarity around the proportions of the population exposed before and after implementation of CLTS to these conditions, made it challenging to determine the quality of the evidence presented.

The Cost of a Knowledge Silo: A Systematic Re-Review of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Interventions, 2013. M Loevinsohn. (Full text)
The health impacts of CLTS have yet to be comprehensively assessed, although it is evident that people realize a range of benefits such as dignity, privacy, security—especially for women—and a clean environment, which they may value more than protection from infection.

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AND THE WINNER IS….Community-led Total Sanitation in Himachal Pradesh

Water and Sanitation Program - The Indian state of Himachal Pradesh has made good progress in achieving rural sanitation outcomes and is well recognized as a high performer at an all-India level. Like other states, Himachal Pradesh also implemented the Total Sanitation Campaign/Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan and Nirmal Gram Puraskar/Clean Village program since their launch and the 2011 Census finds that open-defecation in rural Himachal Pradesh has come down from 72% to 33% in 2001, a downward reduction of 39% and highest among all states of India. By contrast, at national level, open-defecation has come down by 11% from 78% to 69%. This film showcases the state-level strategy which resulted in successful outcomes.

Undoing inequity: water, sanitation and hygiene programmes that deliver for all

UK Under Secretary of State for International Development Lynne Featherstone visiting SHARE-funded Undoing Inequity programme in Uganda. Photo: SHARE/WaterAid

WaterAid is currently carrying out a SHARE-funded action research project in Zambia and Uganda in collaboration with WEDC and the Leonard Cheshire Disability and Inclusive Development Centre (LCD), called Undoing Inequity: water, sanitation and hygiene programmes that deliver for all.  The project aims to generate rigorous evidence about how a lack of safe water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) impacts on the lives of disabled, older persons and people living with a chronic illness; understand the barriers they face, develop and test an inclusive WASH approach to address those barriers and influence key policy and decision makers to mainstream inclusive WASH within development.

As part of this project, Hazel Jones (WEDC) has written a report titled Mainstreaming disability and ageing in water, sanitation and hygiene programmes.  This report recognises that progress on the MDGs is not happening in an equitable way.  A drive for increasing coverage of basic services, such as WASH has meant that people who are ‘harder to reach’, such as disabled and older people often remain un-served.

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Cricket legend Sachin Tendulkar UNICEF ambassador for hygiene & sanitation in South Asia

Recently-retired Indian cricket legend SachinTendulkar has become UNICEF Ambassador for South Asia to promote hygiene and sanitation in the region over the next two years.

“I was disheartened to know was that 1600 children die everyday because of diarrhoeal infected diseases”, Tendulkar said at a press conference on 28 November in Mumbai. “I just want to help UNICEF to make more people aware of this initiative that I am part of. It is as simple as washing your hands with soap”.

A video compilation highlights Tendulkar’s involvement in UNICEF campaigns over the past ten years on issues including polio, HIV/AIDS and handwashing.

Source: UNICEF, 28 Nov 2013 ; Times of India, 28 Nov 2013

India, Bihar: if you want to be elected, get a toilet first

First we had “no toilet, no bride“, now you need a toilet to be elected in India. At least that’s  what chief minister Nitish Kumar is proposing for his state Bihar. He made the announcement on World Toilet Day, 19 November.

Candidates who don’t have a toilet in their home will not be allowed to contest rural (panchayat) and urban local body elections in the state.  The chief minister said he would ensure that relevant legislation (Bihar Panchayati Raj Act) would be amended to make this possible.

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“We Can’t Wait”, say WSSCC, Unilever and WaterAid on World Toilet Day

We Can’t Wait – Governments, civil society and business should work together to tackle sanitation for women’s health; say Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council, Unilever and WaterAid

Dowwload the report here. 

ImageA collaborative approach between governments, civil society and business is essential to getting the Millennium Development Goal sanitation target back on track. This is critical to improve the health and prosperity of women worldwide, says a new report jointly published by the United Nations hosted organisation Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council, international development organisation WaterAid and Unilever’s leading toilet brand Domestos.

The report, We Can’t Wait, was presented today at a UN event in New York which celebrates recognition of the first official World Toilet Day. The day serves to remind the world that over 2.5 billion people lack access to an adequate toilet, with devastating consequences in particular for the well-being, health, education and empowerment of women and girls worldwide.

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“Poo, Pee and be Happy” sculpture unveiled in Singapore for World Toilet Day

Mr. Toilet Jack Sim unveils sanitation sculpture in Singapore

Mr. Toilet Jack Sim unveils sanitation sculpture. Photo: Sunday Times, Singapore

A sculpture representing the World Toilet Day logo has been unveiled on Singapore’s Marina Barrage. Commissioned by the World Toilet Organization, the sculpture’s title “Evolution of Man: Poo Pee Happy” represents the evolution from cave man to civilised man, who enjoys clean sanitation.

World Toilet Day logo

World Toilet Day logo

The World Toilet Organization organised the unveiling ceremony together with PUB, Singapore’s water agency, and the Ministry of Environment and Water Resources (MEWR).

World Toilet Day is the brainchild of “Mr Toilet” Jack Sim, co-founder of the World Toilet Organization. Celebrated each year since 2001 on 19 November, the day has now been officially recognised by the United Nations. An interview with Jack Sim in the wake of World Toilet day was broadcast on Channel News Asia.

Related web site: World Toilet Day

Source: “Poo Pee Happy” sculpture to remind S’poreans of global sanitation crisis, Channel News Asia, 16 Nov 2013 ; Linette Lai, ‘Poo Pee Happy’ sculpture unveiled at Marina Barrage to commemorate World Toilet Day, Sunday Times, 16 Nov 2013

Reaching the unreached in South Asia with sanitation [video]

New video launched by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) during SACOSAN V in Nepal.

Including examples from Nepal, India and Pakistan, the video points to the Colombo Declaration through which governments from the region have committed themselves to improving access to sanitation and hygiene

WSSCC commissioned the video as part of an associated five-country research study conducted by the Freshwater Action Network South Asia (FANSA).

 

Temples to toilets: Global Interfaith WASH Alliance launched

GIWA launch, New York

Photo: UNICEF/2013/Berger

In 2012, when Indian Minister Jairam Ramesh remarked that “the country needs more toilets than temples”, he was stripped of his additional post as Minister of State for Drinking Water and Sanitation [1].

GIWA-logoNot all religious leaders object to linking temples to toilets though. On 25 September 2013, a Rabbi, a Swami, an Imam and a Sister of Mercy were among those who congregated at UNICEF House in New York to celebrate the launch of GIWA, the Global Interfaith WASH Alliance.

Inspired by the Earth Charter, GIWA’s 14 founding members, share a common goal: “a water-secure world [...] in which all children may enjoy their right to safe drinking water and to adequate sanitation”.

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