Category Archives: Hygiene Promotion

April 4, 2016 – Handwashing Think Tank

April 4, 2016 – Handwashing Think Tank – Moving from Evidence to Action: Integration, Settings, and Scale handwashingthinktank

The facts about handwashing are clear. It prevents illness–from the commonplace such as influenza, diarrhea, and pneumonia–to the rare, yet deadly–such as Ebola. It’s benefits are far reaching as it impacts not only health, but also nutrition, education, and equity. And, in addition to being effective, it is affordable and accessible.
Yet, despite the clear benefits of hygiene, far too often it isn’t prioritized from the personal level to the policy level.

Join the Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and WaterAid as we learn how the evidence in handwashing integration, settings, and scale can be acted upon.

This event will feature brief, engaging presentations from experts in each of these areas. Attendees will also learn about the latest in handwashing research and have an opportunity to ask questions of the presenters. The event will be concluded with a cocktail reception.

WHEN – Tuesday, April 12, 2016 from 4:00 PM to 7:30 PM (BST)
WHERE – London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine – John Snow Lecture Theatre Main Keppel Street Building, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom

 

A Future Re-imagined: Urban Sanitation In India (Video)

Published on Mar 3, 2016
It’s not just about toilets. If we want to improve the quality of life in India, we’ve got to start paying attention to the sanitation value chain. Dasra.org

I get height with a little help from my friends: herd protection from sanitation on child growth in rural Ecuador

I get height with a little help from my friends: herd protection from sanitation on child growth in rural Ecuador. Intl Jnl Epidem, Mar 2016.

Authors: James A. Fuller, Eduardo Villamor, et al.

Background: Infectious disease interventions, such as vaccines and bed nets, have the potential to provide herd protection to non-recipients. Similarly, improved sanitation in one household may provide community-wide benefits if it reduces contamination in the shared environment. Sanitation at the household level is an important predictor of child growth, but less is known about the effect of sanitation coverage in the community.

Methods: From 2008 to 2013, we took repeated anthropometric measurements on 1314 children under 5 years of age in 24 rural Ecuadorian villages. Using mixed effects regression, we estimated the association between sanitation coverage in surrounding households and child growth.

Results: Sanitation coverage in the surrounding households was strongly associated with child height, as those with 100% coverage in their surroundings had a 67% lower prevalence of stunting [prevalence ratio (PR) 0.32, 95% CI 0.15-0.69] compared with those with 0% coverage. Children from households with improved sanitation had a lower prevalence of stunting (PR 0.86, 95% CI 0.64-1.15). When analysing height as a continuous outcome, the protective effect of sanitation coverage is manifested primarily among girls during the second year of life, the time at which growth faltering is most likely to occur.

Conclusions: Our study highlights that a household’s sanitation practices can provide herd protection to the overall community. Studies which fail to account for the positive externalities that sanitation provides will underestimate the overall protective effect. Future studies could seek to identify a threshold of sanitation coverage, similar to a herd immunity threshold, to provide coverage and compliance targets.

Webinars – Understanding Behavior Change to Ensure Success

Plan International and the Water Institute at UNC Findings on CLTS

Plan International USA and the Water Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) have released new findings and results about rural sanitation behavior change processes using the Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach. Entitled CLTS Learning Series: Lessons from CLTS Implementation in Seven Countries, the research report identifies implications for practice and delivers policy recommendations based on a rigorous review of seven country case studies and their approach to CLTS implementation.

Covering experiences from Haiti, Uganda, Niger, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Nepal, and Indonesia, long-form, individual country reports are complemented by a meta-analysis of all case studies, as well as a shorter, executive summary style briefing paper for rapid review. plan_unc

The reports present common features to CLTS implementation, identifies consistent bottlenecks and enabling conditions, and shares lessons relevant to scaling-up CLTS.

Copies of all reports from this work are available at the project website: https://waterinstitute.unc.edu/clts/

Lack of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and its effects on nutrition

Published on Feb 5, 2016

Video of Generation Nutrition about the link between WASH and Nutrition.

DriButts Enlists Diapers in the Global Fight Against Disease

DriButts Enlists Diapers in the Global Fight Against Disease | Source: Leon Kaye, Triple Pundit, Feb. 19, 2016 |

The advancement of mobile technology in the developing world is an exciting trend, unless you consider one sobering statistic: Data out there suggest that more people worldwide have cell phones than access to toilets.

diapers

DriButts diapers work in regions lacking electricity or unreliable access to water.

This lack of access to sanitation is rife in countries including India, where public defecation is an ongoing health problem. Plenty of reasons explain this disconnect between the rapid adoption of technology and the lack of what to many of us is a basic human right. The blame is put on poor education, poverty, the fact that many people do not have title to the land they occupy and the lack of infrastructure. The result is that the United Nations estimates that more than 1 billion people worldwide have no access to proper toilet facilities.

Easy access to toilets could save the lives of an estimated 200,000 children annually. But one problem is that, even where public toilets or latrines are available, many infants and toddlers are not properly diapered. Their feces end up contributing to the spread of diseases, which in part contributes to the estimated 1.8 billion people who are using a source of drinking water contaminated by human fecal matter. Now a social enterprise is trying to reverse that trend by selling goods that can help provide diapers for youngsters living in poor rural areas worldwide.

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