Category Archives: Hygiene Promotion

WASHplus: Behavior-Centered Approaches to Improve Health Outcomes, A Learning Brief

Behavior-Centered Approaches to Improve Health Outcomes, A Learning Brief, 2016. WASHplus.

This technical brief presents the WASHplus approach to behavior change applied in various country settings to imrove WASH practices and serve as the foundation of the project’s global guidance.

 

WASHplus – A Surprise Inoculation Against Cholera

A Surprise Inoculation Against Cholera, 2016. WASHplus.

Communities that embraced the WASHplus and Kenya Ministry of Health community-led total sanitation-plus approach appear to have protected themselves against cholera during a recent epidemic.

Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries

Linkedin Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries – 5,745 members

Welcome to the Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene. The aim of the CoP is to reinforce the global community of those working in sanitation and hygiene and create a neutral platform to share and learn together.

The group is managed by a coordinator who currently sits within the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC). The coordinator works with a global team of ‘stewards’ who are dedicated and well respected sector professionals. The Stewards are responsible for the strategic decisions for the CoP and each one brings different opportunities, networks and geographical representation to the table.

What Kenya Can Teach The U.S. About Menstrual Pads

What Kenya Can Teach The U.S. About Menstrual Pads | Source: NPR, May 10, 2016 |

The United States is only just starting to get periods — or, at least, acknowledging that products for “that time of the month” aren’t optional for menstruating women.

In 40 states, plus the District of Columbia, pads and tampons are subject to sales tax. Earlier this year, when President Obama was asked why they haven’t been exempted like other necessities, he said, “I suspect it’s because men were making the laws when those taxes were passed.”

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Faith Wanjoki of ZanaAfrica gives a lesson on how to use a sanitary pad in a classroom in Kisumu, Kenya. Her colleague, Catherine Onyango, sits by her side. ZanaAfrica Foundation

But there’s a movement to fight these taxes, and several states have eliminated them. Next up: New York, which has just passed a bill that’s awaiting Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s signature.

Meanwhile, one country is way ahead of the U.S. when it comes to understanding that pads and tampons shouldn’t be taxed.

It’s Kenya.

Kenya repealed its value added tax on pads and tampons back in 2004 to lower the price consumers pay. And since 2011, the Kenyan government has been budgeting about $3 million per year to distribute free sanitary pads in schools in low-income communities.

That’s not to say Kenya is an ideal place to get one’s period. Many Kenyan girls still don’t have access to sanitary products, so they use unhygienic materials like chicken feathers, cheap mattresses and newspapers to fashion makeshift pads, says Megan White Mukuria.

Mukuria is the founder of ZanaAfrica Foundation, which delivers health education — and sanitary pads — to help girls stay in school. A girl who is embarrassed to stain her uniform (or has an infection) is one who is likely to skip class and eventually drop out, Mukuria explains. UNESCO estimates that more than two million Kenyan girls need support in order to get menstrual hygiene products.

Read the complete article.

If These Kids From MP Find Someone Defecating In Open, There’s A Funny Way They Tackle It – WaterAid India

Published on Apr 5, 2016

An inspiring story of a group of children from Sehore in Madhya Pradesh who set off at the crack of dawn to prevent people from defecating in the open using a unique method. See how these young crusaders in the fight against open defecation are inspiring their communities to stop open defecation.

SuSanA webinar monthly webinar 1: “Opportunities & challenges of achieving WASH behaviour change”

Published on Apr 28, 2016

The webinar brought together speakers who presented their perspectives on how we can improve WASH behavior change. First, we learnt about how we can do a better job of leveraging the influence of community leaders to change some of the social and cultural norms that prevent uptake of healthy WASH behaviors. The role of both formal and informal leaders was explored, as well as how to extend this collaboration beyond CLTS to incorporate it more into other WASH approaches.

Disgust, Shame, and Soapy Water: Tests of Novel Interventions to Promote Safe Water and Hygiene

Disgust, Shame, and Soapy Water: Tests of Novel Interventions to Promote Safe Water and HygieneJournal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists 3, no. 2 (June 2016): 321-359. Authors: Raymond P. Guiteras, David I. Levine, Stephen P. Luby, et al.

Lack of access to clean water is among the most pressing environmental problems in developing countries, where diarrheal disease kills nearly 700,000 children per year. While inexpensive and effective practices such as chlorination and hand washing with soap exist, efforts to motivate their use by emphasizing health benefits have seen only limited success.

This paper measures the effect of messages appealing to negative emotions (disgust at consumption of human feces) and social pressure (shame at being seen consuming human feces) on hand-washing behavior and use of and willingness to pay for water chlorination among residents of slum compounds in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Neither the traditional, health-based message nor the new disgust-and-shame message led to high levels of chlorination during a free trial, nor to high willingness to pay for the chlorine at the end of the free trial. Provision of low-cost hand-washing facilities did increase hand washing, although the effect size is modest.