Category Archives: Progress on Sanitation

29 April 2014 – SuSanA/SEI webinar on “Adding missing links in sanitation value chains” with BMGF grantees

The Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) with assistance of a team led by Stockholm Environment Institute is inviting you to the 7th webinar with Gates Foundation sanitation grantees.

  • Topic of the webinar is “Adding missing links in sanitation value chains”
  • Date/Time: Tuesday 29 April 2014, 16:30 – 17:15 (CET – Central European Time; use this time converter to find your local time)
  • Agenda: 16:00 Set-up of connections (you can start entering the virtual meeting room) – 16:30 recording starts – three presentations; each presentation is about 5 minutes long and is followed by around 10 minutes of questions – 17:15 end of webinar.
  • The virtual meeting room can accommodate up to 100 participantsAttendance at this webinar is open to all.
  • Once recorded, the webinar will be put online on the SuSanA Youtube channel in this Playlist together with previous webinars.

Three grantees of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will present their research results:

reyes1 – Is a power auger “Excrevator” a suitable tool to empty pit latrines in South Africa and septic tanks in India? By Francis de los Reyes (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA)
Previous discussion about this research on the forum

 

yeh2 – A compact water recycling and energy harvesting system for off-grid public toilets in low-income urban areas: The NEWgeneratorTM anaerobic membrane bioreactor ready for field testing in India. By Daniel Yeh (University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA)
Previous discussion about this research on the forum.

herzon3 – Community-scale facility to process faeces and faecal sludge into safe biochar by pyrolysis – field testing this year with Sanergy in Nairobi. By Brian von Herzen and Laura Talsma (Climate Foundation, California, USA)
Previous discussion about this research on the forum.

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THE URBAN PROGRAMMING GUIDE: How to design and implement a pro-poor urban WASH programme

Improving water, sanitation and hygiene services to low-income urban areas is a highly challenging and complex task. Traditional approaches have often failed to work. We need new approaches and fresh thinking. We need governments, donors and sector professionals genuinely committed to improving services in slum settlements. It’s challenging but it can be done! This guide offers some solutions based around WSUP’s experience: all you have to do is put them into practice!

The guide provides an introduction to urban WASH programming: how to design and implement a pro-poor urban water, sanitation and hygiene programme.

Urban Programming Guide
Who is this guide for?
This guide is primarily designed for WASH professionals working in governments, development agencies, funding agencies or civil society organisations. It will also be useful for professionals working for service providers including water utilities, local authorities and in the private sector.

How to use this guide
The guide provides an overview of some key strategies and service delivery models. It’s not intended to be encyclopaedic: it’s a rapid-reference document with the following intended uses:

  • To aid the planning, design and implementation of urban WASH programmes.
  • To assist with investment planning by service providers.
  • To point the reader towards further sources of information and guidance.

The guide is free to download from WSUP’s website: http://www.wsup.com/resource/the-urban-programming-guide

12 March – SuSanA​​–WASHtech webinar on Technology Applicability Framework (TAF)

SuSanA

12 March -16h00 : SuSanA​​–WASHtech webinar on Technology Applicability Framework (TAF)

SuSanA secretariat and WASHtech invites you to participate in a webinar that will present and discuss the Technology Applicability Framework (TAF) developed during the WASHtech project: www.washtechnologies.net

When: 16h00 CET on 12th March 2014 (Time converter: www.worldtimebuddy.com/)

Webinar outline:

15h30- Webinar room open
16h00- Welcome by Trevor Surridge (SuSanA secretariat)
16h05- Introduction to TAF by André Olschewski (Skat Foundation)
16h15- Questions on André’s presentation
16h20- Experiences using TAF in Ghana by Benedict Tuffuor (TREND)
16h30- Questions on Benedict’s presentation
16h35- WaterAid’s experience adapting and applying the TAF to a pour-flush toilet option in the Nicaraguan Caribbean by Joshua Briemberg (WaterAid)
16h45- Questions on Joshua presentation leading into an open Q&A session
16h59- Closing and wrap-up from Trevor
17h00- End of Webinar

Webinar Chair: Trevor Surridge (SuSanA secretariat)
Moderation Support: Sean Furey (Skat Foundation)

To participate you need to register:
To register send an email to ruralwater@skat.ch and clearly state “TAF webinar” in the subject and you will be sent an invitation link to the Webinar.

Technical requirements:
For the technical requirements for WebEx:

If you have any questions about the webinar post them in reply to this post or email them to info@susana.org.

Study Highlights Limited Progress in WASH Access Among Sub-Saharan African Cities

George Washington University Study Highlights Limited Progress in Water and Sanitation Access Among Major Sub-Saharan African Cities | Source: George Washington University, School of Public Health |

Sub-Saharan Africa’s urban population is predicted to nearly triple by 2050, increasing from 414 million to over 1.2 billion. This growth challenges municipalities attempting to provide basic access to water supply and sanitation (WS&S). A new analysis published in BMC Public Health by researchers at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) looks at how well cities in sub-Saharan Africa are doing when it comes to providing their urban residents with access to basic public health infrastructure.

Photo credit: Jay Graham

Photo credit: Jay Graham

Mike Hopewell, a recent graduate of the MPH program at SPHHS, and Jay Graham, an SPHHS assistant professor of environmental and occupational health, estimated changes in access to water supply and sanitation in the largest cities across sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2012. They then explored the relationship of city-level and country-level factors to progress or regression in these cities.

The authors found that cities appeared to be making the most progress in gaining access to WS&S along metrics that reflect specified targets of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), global targets for improved wellbeing that countries aim to achieve by 2015. Nearly half of the cities, however, did not make progress in reducing open defecation or the time households spent collecting water. This may reflect a focus on “improved” services that are MDG targets while other measures, potentially more relevant to the extreme poor, are being neglected. This study highlights the need to better characterize access, beyond definitions of improved and unimproved, as well as the need to target resources to cities where changes in WS&S access have stalled, or in some cases regressed.

Cartoon contest – break the silence about toilets and sanitation in India!

With your creativity we want to break the silence about toilets and sanitation in India! SanitationTaboo

The Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) and GIZ together with Goethe Institute Max Müller, the Indian Institute for Cartoonists and EAWAG/Sandec invite creative minds to submit fun and striking ideas about toilets and sanitation in the form of Cartoons, Caricatures or Infographics that will create a humorous atmosphere around sanitation concerns. Because sanitation in India is still a taboo; the media doesn’t address the issue often enough and people feel uncomfortable talking about it, even though it’s an issue that concerns all of us – several times a day, every day. We are flexible with the entry’s format as long as it:

Surprises the silent majority and makes them laugh and talk about sanitation!

So what’s the cartoon competition all about?

  • The idea is to have a cartoon competition on the topic of sanitation and toilets.
  • The inspiration comes from the ‘Reinvented Toilets’ Programme by the Gates Foundation.
  • The approach taken by the Cartoon-Competition is, however, one both smaller in scale and more abstract in style.
  • The essence of the endeavour is to break the taboo that surrounds talking about sanitation and toilets in India with humor and laughter.

The deadline for submitting entries is Monday, 10 March, 2014 (midnight Indian Standard Time).

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Benin – Behaviour change, a must for improved sanitation

Benin – Behaviour change, a must for improved sanitation | Source/complete article:  Edmund Smith-Asante | Graphic.com – 21 February 2014

Excerpts - Benin’s Minister of Health, Professor Dorothéme Kinde Gazard, has called on African nations to lay emphasis on behaviour change communication, as it is the surest way to achieve improved sanitation.

Disclosing that 87 per cent of Africans were still engaged in open defecation, while only three out of 10 people washed their hands with soap, she stated, “So the challenge is also on behaviour change.”

Some of the participants at the Benin workshop.

Some of the participants at the Benin workshop.

The Health Minister therefore urged African countries to strike a balance between change in behaviour and the provision of sanitation facilities.

Governments’ Commitments to WASH

Professor Dorothéme Gazard made the statements when she addressed the opening of a three-day regional workshop on “Advocacy, Communications and Monitoring of [water, sanitation and hygiene] WASH Commitments” for selected journalists, in Cotonou on Tuesday.

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WASHplus Weekly: Focus on WASH and Design Thinking

Issue 133 February 7, 2014 | Focus on WASH and Design Thinking

Design thinking is an interesting approach to problem solving. Clark Kellogg, from the University of California, Berkeley and Collective Invention, states “Unlike most previous problem solving approaches, it is human-centric, collaborative, and driven by experimentation.” One important principle of design thinking is to get feedback from real users as soon as possible in the form of prototypes. While early prototypes often fail, design thinking enables designers to quickly refine ideas based upon feedback from real users. One of the benefits of design thinking is to mitigate risk by testing early and failing fast. weekly

GENERAL/OVERVIEW

David Kelley of IDEO Talks “Design Thinking” on 60 MinutesCBS 60 Minutes, Jan 2013. (Link)
What makes a great designer? According to IDEO founder David Kelley, being an incredible designer isn’t necessarily about having a great aesthetic sensibility or coming up with out-of-the-box ideas. No, Kelley says that the key characteristic is empathy. Kelley has been on teams that created many game-changing products, from the first Apple computer mouse to the stand-up toothpaste tube to the “lavatory occupied” sign on airplanes. And on 60 Minutes, Kelley gives a tour of IDEO and shares his unique approach to what he calls “design thinking.”

Collective Action Toolkit, 2013. Frog Design. (Link)
Is it possible to inspire design thinking outside of the design world? The practice has helped countless organizations innovate new products and services but has infrequently been made available to a broad audience. Frog set out to prove the practice is universal by creating the Collective Action Toolkit, a set of resources and activities to help people accomplish tangible outcomes through a set of guided, nonlinear collaboration activities.

Design Thinking Demystified: An Interview with Clark Kellogg, 2013. N Mahajan. (Link)
Design thinking derives its basic principles from the discipline of design. As Clark Kellogg, partner at Collective Invention and lecturer at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business and College of Environmental Design, explains, unlike most previous problem solving approaches, it is human-centric, collaborative, and driven by experimentation. Many companies, such as consumer products giant Procter & Gamble, GE Healthcare, and Philips Lighting have adopted design thinking processes.

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A ‘Losing Prospect’ Argument for Changing Sanitation Behaviour

A ‘Losing Prospect’ Argument for Changing Sanitation Behaviour |

Excerpts: 

  • Fact #1: One in six people still defecate in the open.
  • Fact #2: Most of them are not entirely convinced that a toilet does any good.
  • Fact #3: Many of the recent toilet adopters still like to go in the open.

I don’t mean to be alarmist, but these signal a need for a shift in thinking about the complex problem of addressing behaviour change with respect to toilet adoption. bd-blog-latrine-customer

With a myriad missing links to sustainable sanitation uptake, I’ll stick my neck out and say that the stickiest issue in sanitation today is not one of lack of investment, nor political commitment or markets. Clearly, the governments understand the wide-ranging impacts of sanitation on health, environment, and economy, and have committed billions of dollars to increasing sanitation coverage. Recently, the Government of India quadrupled its investment in rural sanitation in the current planning period (2012 – 2017) to US$ 6 billion through its ambitious Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan program. Moreover, there seems to be robust enthusiasm in the private sector for the ‘ready for take-off’sanitation market in low-and-middle income countries with low coverage. The continually baffling dilemma is in some ways an age-old one – that of changing mindsets.

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Global Sanitation Fund in Malawi

Global Sanitation Fund in Malawi, by Rochelle Holm, Ph.D., PMP, Mzuzu University, Centre of Excellence in Water and Sanitation and SMART Centre Manager. Email: rochelledh@hotmail.com.
The Global Sanitation Fund programme in Malawi is aimed at implementing sanitation and hygiene initiatives that will help the Government of Malawi to attain its vision of ensuring Sanitation for All in the country and its mission of ensuring that all Malawians access improved sanitation facilities, practice safe hygiene and re-use or recycle waste for the sustainable management of the environment and socio-economic development.  gsf-malawi
The programme will help in reducing Malawi’s open defecation which the JMP 2013 Update (World Health Organization and UNICEF) estimates to stand at 7% in 2011. This reduction in open defecation will be achieved through:
  • triggering 3,600 villages and 274 schools in the six districts using Community Led Total Sanitation and School Led Total Sanitation approaches, respectively, and promoting the adoption of improved sanitation and hygiene practices;
  • conducting sanitation marketing in support of the triggering;
  • developing the capacity of government, civil society organizations and private sector actors in hygiene and sanitation promotion;
  • supporting the planning and implementation of sanitation and hygiene activities at district level;
  • documenting lessons learnt to help improve programming in sanitation and hygiene.

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WASHplus Weekly: Focus on Inclusive WASH

Issue 127 December 20, 2013 | Focus on Inclusive WASH

Many thanks to Shamila Jansz from WaterAid who contributed many of the reports, training materials, etc. to this issue on inclusive water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). The resources fall under the following categories: fact sheets, stories from the field, training resources, reports, journal articles, conference papers, and websites. Reports and videos from Ethiopia, Kenya, Mali, Nepal, Uganda, and other countries are also included.

If you haven’t done so already, the WASHplus Knowledge Management (KM) team would appreciate your comments and suggestions about WASHplus KM services. The link to the KM survey is https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/3G7SH7C.

FACT SHEETS/BRIEFING NOTES

Briefing Note on WASH and People with Disabilities and Leprosy, 2013. WaterAid/Ethiopia. (Link)
Using case studies from a WaterAid/Ethiopia-supported project, this briefing note discusses the links between WASH and disability and leprosy.

Factsheet: WASH and HIV, 2013. WaterAid; StopAIDS Coalition. (Link)
This fact sheet sets out to explain the connection between WASH and HIV and AIDS, and provides recommendations on how HIV interventions can integrate WASH into their programming.

Inclusive WASH Development: Technology Adaptations for Persons with Disabilities, 2013. N Kamban. (Link)
It is the objective of this briefing paper to describe the findings, recommendations, and guidelines for inclusive WASH development gleaned from experience with the Africa WASH & Disabilities Study.

STORIES FROM THE FIELD

A Difficult Journey to Toilet, 2013. WaterAid/Nepal. (Video)
In Nepal more than 500,000 people live with disability. This video tells the story of the 350,000 disabled who do not have access to toilets. For example, in Kathmandu, no public toilets are designated disabled-friendly.

Kenya: Four Stories from the Field, 2013. WASHplus.
String, Jug, & a Bucket | Community Volunteers | Simple Actions | Innovative Solution |
WASHplus is helping communities in Kenya make the connection between healthy hygiene habits and improved sanitation and positive outcomes for people living with HIV and AIDs and their families.

Undoing Inequity: Inclusive Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Programmes that Deliver for All, 2013. WaterAid; SHARE. (Video)
This video discusses the cost of inclusive WASH service delivery in Uganda. A SHARE-funded WaterAid project reaches out to all community members who struggle to use standard WASH facilities—persons with disability, the elderly, and the chronically ill— in hopes of moving them up the sanitation ladder along with the rest of their neighbors.

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