Category Archives: Progress on Sanitation

The Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) at the World Water Week 2016 in Stockholm

The World Water Week 2016 in Stockholm is lying ahead and the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) will be Co-Convener of several exciting events related to WASH and Sustainable Sanitation. Moreover, the 22nd SuSanA Meeting (27th of August) as well as several SuSanA Working Group Meetings will take place during the SWWW. Make sure to take a look at the official SWWW SuSanA Flyer (link below) to find out more about the event topics and their schedule.

Apart from the events themselves the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance will be hosting an official SuSanA Booth (Booth No. 44) where you can have interesting conversations on the topic or simply read through some of the latest SuSanA publications.

For all people that are interested but not able to join the SWWW there will be a Live Stream of the SuSanA events as well as live Twitter updates using the hashtag #22susana

If you want to register for the SuSanA events at the SWWW you can find the registration link as well as more information here: http://www.susana.org/en/events/susana-meetings/2016/505-22nd-susana-meeting-stockholm

Lastly, if you have any questions or comments you can post them on the SuSanA Forum (after registration): http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/232-susana-meetings/18372-22nd-susana-meeting-27-august-2016-and-susana-events-at-world-water-week-in-stockholm

SuSanA_Events_SWWW2016_Flyer

 

The ‘perennial hope’: private sector investment in WASH in Nigeria

The ‘perennial hope’: private sector investment in WASH in Nigeria | Source: WaterAid Blog, Aug 11 2016 |

With WASH in Nigeria suffering low levels of investment, and current investments performing poorly, Michael Ojo, Country Director for WaterAid Nigeria, asks why the Nigerian water sector remains such an unattractive proposition for investors.

As things stand, the true extent of national funding for WASH in Nigeria is difficult to ascertain.

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Community members collecting water from one of the two functioning boreholes in Etenyi village, Ado Local government area, Benue state, Nigeria. Adequate funds in the WASH sector and proper targeting of those funds will help ensure we reach everyone with these life-saving services.

Although the country’s water utilities receive subventions from the Government, funding allocations are inadequate, resulting not only in these utilities producing below capacity but also in a widening of the financing gap for infrastructure investments and maintenance over the years. Investment in strengthening the utilities’ structure and systems has also been insufficient.

Urban utilities have not only not extended their coverage in terms of connections, these have actually declined significantly – from 32% in 1990 to 3% in 2015, according to the 2015 Update Report of the Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) of WHO and UNICEF.

From whichever angle you look at it, this level of service can only be described as paltry – but it also underlines the opportunity presented. Revenue streams from taxes have not grown, customers are not metered, and the collection efficiency of tariffs and charges remains one of the lowest in the world.

Read the complete article.

 

Margaret Batty/WaterAid – Poor globally being failed on sanitation

Margaret Batty/WaterAid – Poor globally being failed on sanitation | Source: The Guardian, Aug 14 2016 |

WaterAid shares the global concern for the world’s top athletes dealing with the sewage in Rio’s bays (Report, 4 August). But the heavily contaminated waters don’t only put at risk the health of Olympians, it’s clear they also adversely affect the millions of people facing this faecal nightmare, day-in and day-out.

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Rubbish along the edge of Guanabara Bay, Rio, the venue for the Olympic sailing events. ‘These Olympic Games have put the spotlight on one of the most urgent yet beatable crises of our time. World leaders must address it,’ writes Margaret Batty of WaterAid. Photograph: Mario Tama/Getty

Despite Brazil being an upper-middle income country, nearly 2% of Brazilians, or 3.5 million people, have no access to clean water, and 17%, or 35 million people, live without good sanitation. In Rio alone, 30% of the population is not connected to a formal sewerage system. It is a travesty that anyone should have to live like this.

Sadly, Brazil is not alone in facing a water and sanitation crisis. One in three people globally live without decent toilets, and one in 10 are without clean water. These Olympic Games have put the spotlight on one of the most urgent yet beatable crises of our time. World leaders must address it.

The UN global goals for sustainable development were agreed by these leaders last year. The challenge now is to put those promises into action, ensuring that everyone, everywhere has clean water and sanitation by 2030.
Margaret Batty
Director of global policy and campaigns, WaterAid

USAID Sanitation Working Group Webinar

USAID Sanitation Working Group Webinar

I want to thank our speakers Yi Wei from iDE and Dana Ward from PSI for their informative presentations and active discussion yesterday.  usaid-logo-jpg
Below you find a link the recorded version of the webinar.

Regards,
Jesse Shapiro
WASH Advisor and Sanitation Focal Point
U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)

A Cheap, Easy Fix to Rio’s Sewage Problem

A Cheap, Easy Fix to Rio’s Sewage Problem | Source: The Atlantic, Aug 4 2016 |

The reason so much sewage is flushed directly into Rio’s Guanabara Bay, city officials have argued, is that it’s too difficult to lay pipes in much of the city. The favelas are crowded and carved into steep mountainsides.

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Barros uses cups to demonstrate how the biodigester works. (Olga Khazan / The Atlantic)

They can be dangerous. Environmental activists, meanwhile, contend there’s not enough government will behind sanitation projects.

But there is one solution that gets around these issues: A cheap, seven-foot, cement dome that treats sewage with little more than some rocks, plants, and, well, coprophagic bacteria.

I learned about this contraption, called a biodigester, on a December reporting trip to Rio. On a scorching hot day, I took a cab up a mountain in the city’s northern zone, where I met Otavio Barros, the leader of the Vale Encantado community.

Read the complete article.

2016 WEDC conference presentations on fecal sludge management

The 122 presentations from the 2016 WEDC conference are now online at http://wedc.lu/wedc39 and below are links to presentations on the topic of fecal sludge management. wedc_moodle

  1. A socio-economic analysis of different approaches to faecal sludge treatment in Sunyani, Ghana Mallory, Adrian
  2. An exploration of sanitation and waste disposal practices in low-income communities in Accra, Ghana Abraham, Ernest M
  3. Analysis of faecal sludge collection efficiency for improvement in developing countries Flamand, Pierre
  4. Comparison of scales for faecal sludge gravimetric characterization in low-resource settings Therrien, Jean-David
  5. Development of low-cost decentralized faecal sludge treatment system for resource recovery Atwijukye, Osbert
  6. Effects of high-strength fecal sludge in wastewater stabilization ponds: Port-au-Prince, Haiti Martinsen, Andrea
  7. How to improve sanitation in Mae La refugee camp: SI sludge treatment unit Cavalazzi, Fabrizio
  8. Overcoming capacity gaps in fecal sludge management through education and training Philippe, Sterenn

 

SHARE – Introducing Our New Partner – CIDRZ

SHARE started an exciting new phase of its work in 2015, that will run until 2018. Here, Dr Roma Chilengi reflects upon the Centre for Infectious Disease Research’s involvement in SHARE’s second phase, through an investigation of the effect of a behaviour change intervention on sanitation demand in urban Zambia.