Category Archives: Sanitary Facilities

USAID; IUCN – Viet Nam: Ha Long Bay boat waste collection and treatment

Viet Nam: Ha Long Bay boat waste collection and treatment: final report, 2016. USAID; IUCN.

INTRODUCTION
There are approximately 500 boats cruising through the bay waters, of which about 300 are dayboat and 200 are overnight-boats. In this report, bay waters refers to the three bays: Ha Long, Bai Tu Long and Lan Ha. Many of the boats that operate in the bay can be compared to floating hotels and thus generate lots of waste: both solid waste and waste water but also air pollutants (black fumes) and noise pollution.

Waste water includes black water (toilet waste), grey water (wastewater from sinks, baths,
showers and laundry) and bilge water (oily water that accumulates in the lowest part of a
ship). Hereafter, we identify and recommend concrete solutions to collect and treat waste water from such cruise boats and remove floating waste from the bay’s water. Indeed, it is necessary to implement active and concrete measures in order to address the decreasing environmental quality of the Ha Long Bay and restore the unique natural beauty of this important tourist location and World Heritage Site.

Continue reading

WSUP -Webinar: A toilet in every compound – what we’ve learned so far from Kumasi and Accra, Ghana

Published on Oct 10, 2016
Many low-income residents of Kumasi and Ga West (Accra) live in compound housing where they share the same living space with more than 20 people. The vast majority will have no access to in-house sanitation, instead relying on the high number of public toilets which typify Ghana’s urban centres.

Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly (KMA) and Ga West Municipal Authority (GWMA) are responding to this challenge through a 5-year compound sanitation strategy, now being implemented with support from the USAID Sanitation Service Delivery (SSD) program.

This webinar presented the learning we’ve had so far, and the successes and failures of the strategy.

Presenters: Georges Mikhael (Head of Sanitation, WSUP), Frank Romeo Kettey (Project Manager, WSUP Ghana) and Richard Amaning (WASH Financing Expert, SNV). Moderated by Sam Drabble (Research and Evaluation Manager, WSUP).

 

Which way’s up? – a closer look at the sanitation ladder

Which way’s up? – a closer look at the sanitation ladder. CLTS Blog, October 14, 2016.

Now that the first year of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is almost over, it’s no surprise that a lot of the conversation at the UNC Water and Health Conference this week has centred on how WASH-related targets (mostly within Goal 6) will be met and, in particular, how they will be monitored. jmp-ladders

The complexity (and sheer number) of targets appear to be nothing short of a monitoring nightmare, but one which many in the field have enthusiastically embraced as an opportunity to build on previous monitoring processes.

Representatives from the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation (JMP) kicked off the week with a presentation focused on the sanitation and hygiene targets. Of note is the introduction of a clearly defined ladder for reporting on the progress of hand washing – notably absent in the MDGs.

Most of the discussion was focused on the sanitation ladder and in particular the renaming of the category ‘shared’ to ‘limited service’ (at least, within the presentation!) which re-opened a long-standing debate about shared sanitation facilities. I recall a heated session at the 2014 WASH Conference in Brisbane, Australia, convened by Catarina Fonseca (IRC).

Continue reading

Fed up with no sewers, Pakistan’s slum residents go DIY

Fed up with no sewers, Pakistan’s slum residents go DIY | Source: Reuters, Oct 13 2016 |

In Orangi Town, home to an estimated 2.4 million people, residents have given up waiting for the government to install public services – and built them by hand

KARACHI, Pakistan, Oct 13 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – For Sultana Javed, one of dozens of residents living without proper sanitation on her street in the Orangi Town slum, the final straw came when her toddler daughter fell into the soak pit where the family disposed of their waste.

orasngi3

An aerial view of informal settlements in Orangi Town, Karachi on October 4, 2016. Thomson Reuters Foundation/Aamir Saeed

Since moving to the Gulshan-e-Zia area of the slum in Karachi nine years earlier, Javed had poured waste into the soak pit, a porous chamber that lets sewage soak into the ground and is often used by communities that lack toilets.

Javed, whose son caught dengue fever from mosquitoes near the pit outside their home, began mobilising others among 22 families on her street to install their own sewerage system.

“We are fed up with stench of wastewater and frequent mosquito-borne diseases like malaria and dengue fever. So, we have decided to lay a sewerage pipeline in our street on a self-help basis,” Javed, 45, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Read the complete article.

Indestructible and smart: public toilet innovation in India

An interview with sanitation entrepreneur Mayank Midha.

garv-toilet-1-horz

Stainless steel GARV Ttoilets and Mayank Midha

As a child, Mayank Midha remembers how his mother and sister suffered during long distance journeys in India. They had to “hold themselves up” because there were hardly any decent public toilets on the way.

There is still a shortage of well-maintained public toilets in India, says Mayank. This affects women and girls most. Men can more easily urinate or defecate in the open.

Indestructible toilets

On 7 September 2016, Mayank Midha won the Sanitation Innovation Accelerator 2016, a search for an inclusive and sustainable solution for rural sanitation in India. The judges praised Mayank for developing an indestructible smart toilet, which is much cheaper than comparable models without comprising on quality.

Mayank has been in the manufacturing business for the past seven years. As an engineer with a post-graduate degree in rural management, he is interested in technical solutions for the poorest people at the “Base of the Pyramid” (BoP). After completing a project to manufacture telecom enclosure panels, he saw three spare panels lying in the factory. Their structure  made Mayank think, why not change some specifications and use them to construct Portable Smart Toilets?

After a year a prototype was ready in 2015 and in 2016 the stainless steel insulated GARV Toilet was born. Solar panels power LED lights and exhaust fans inside the toilet. Using stainless steel for the superstructure, toilet pans, and washbasins has multiple advantages: the units are vandal-proof, easy to clean and they don’t rust. This means a higher shelf-life with lower operating costs.

Continue reading

Using a CLTS approach in peri-urban and urban areas

Published on Oct 6, 2016

Although Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) was designed for and is predominantly being used in rural settings, there are a growing number of cases that have adopted a CLTS approach in peri-urban and urban areas.

This webinar looked at its use in urban areas. Jamie Myers, research officer at the CLTS Knowledge Hub, presented the urban work the Hub have been engaging in. Drawing on global experience he proposed that urban CLTS does not mean strictly following processes and tools that have been used in rural areas but adhering to similar principles and designing an intervention based on the context of a specific town or city.

Want to engage with wetland communities? Start with sanitation!

An interview with Dr. Ritesh Kumar of Wetlands International South Asia.

Loktak Lake fisherman, Manipur, India

Loktak Lake fisherman, Manipur, India. Photo: Sandro Lacarbona. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Every morning at four o’clock, thousands of men wake up to go fishing in Loktak Lake. When they return home in the early afternoon, their wives take the fish to the market.

Loktak Lake in Manipur is the largest freshwater lake in Northeast India. This unique ecosystem is both a source of water and livelihood for around 100,000 people living on and around the lake. Loktak Lake is famous for its phumdis or floating islands. The lake’s Keibul Lamjao National Park is the only floating park in the world.

Poor sanitation threatens livelihood

If the lake’s fishermen or their wives fall ill, or if there is less fish to catch, they earn less. In both cases, poor sanitation is often the culprit. Fishermen risk getting skin diseases from polluted lake water. The whole family gets sick if faecal waste leaches into their drinking water sources. Water hyacinths thrive on faecal nutrients, choking the lake and the fish.

Wetlands International worked in Loktak Lake for several years up to 2013. “We are ‘accidental learners’ when it comes to sanitation”, says Dr. Ritesh Kumar, Conservation Programme Manager – South Asia.

Providing twin pit toilets to fishing families seemed like a simple solution to improve their health and protect their livelihood.  “Later we realised that soil conditions caused faecal waste to leach into water sources”, Dr. Kumar tells me from his office in New Delhi’s Defence Colony. Moving the toilets away from the houses to rocky areas solves the leaching problem, but gives rise to others, Dr. Kumar admits. The toilets are less accessible for the ill, disabled and the elderly; women and girls feel less safe to use them after dark.

Continue reading