Category Archives: Sanitary Facilities

Laying the Groundwork to Scale Up Sanitation Marketing in Ethiopia

Laying the Groundwork to Scale Up Sanitation Marketing in Ethiopia, 2016. WASHplus.

Between February 2, 2015 and October 31st, 2015, with support from USAID’s WASHplus project and the Vitol Foundation, iDE implemented a project to scale up rural sanitation marketing in rural areas of four regions of Ethiopia (SNNPR (Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples), Amhara, Oromia, Tigray). Building on the success of a pilot project that established the potential to scale sanitation marketing in rural Ethiopia, this project aimed to:

1. Continue developing and refining the design of the latrine products (slab and pit lining) as well as the business model for sales and delivery of the latrine;

2. Develop sales training and marketing materials for sales agents and manufacturers.

 

Methane production for sanitation improvement in Haiti

Methane production for sanitation improvement in HaitiBiomass and Bioenergy
Volume 91, August 2016, Pages 288–295.

Authors: Stephanie Lansing, Holly Bowen,  et. al.

There is a great need for decentralized anaerobic digestion (AD) that utilizes wastewater for energy generation. The biochemical methane potential (BMP) of Haitian latrine waste was determined and compared to other waste streams, such as grey water, septage, and dairy manure.

Average methane (CH4) production for the latrine waste (13.6 ml ml−1 substrate) was 23 times greater than septage (0.58 ml ml−1 substrate), and 151 times greater than grey water (0.09 ml ml−1 substrate), illustrating the larger potential when waste is source separated using the decentralized sanitation and reuse (DESAR) concept for more appropriate treatment of each waste stream.

Using the BMP results, methane production based on various AD configurations was calculated, and compared with the full-scale field AD design.

Methane potential from the BMP testing was calculated as 0.006–0.017 m3 person−1 day−1 using the lowest and highest latrine BMP results, which was similar to the values from the full-scale system (0.011 m3 person−1 day−1), illustrating the ability of BMPs to be used to predict biogas production from sanitation digesters in a smaller-scale setting.

WasteAid UK wins award for waste management work

WasteAid UK wins award for waste management work | Source: Resource, June 8, 2016 |

WasteAid UK, a charity helping to establish waste management processes in developing countries, has won a National Energy Globe Award for its work in The Gambia.

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Photo: Mike Webster, WasteAid UK

The charity aims to improve sanitation, environmental pollution and the use of resources in communities in developing countries that have no access to established waste services by delivering simple recycling processes that are low-cost and easily replicable.

Specifically, the Energy Globe Award panel recognised the charity for its work in Brikama in The Gambia, where it has brought ‘an entirely new approach to dealing with the longstanding and intransigent problem of bad waste management’.

WasteAid UK is working with local partners and has set up a local waste training and entrepreneurship centre that researches suitable waste reprocessing techniques, raises awareness about the problems caused by poor waste management and provides practical training in how to recycle waste.

Read the complete article.

Bangladesh – Faecal sludge management new sanitation challenge

Bangladesh – Faecal sludge management new sanitation challenge | Source: The Daily Star, May 18 2016 |

Emphasising the need for managing the faecal sludge (human excreta) speakers at a roundtable yesterday said this sludge will pose huge threats to environment and public health if not properly managed.

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Participants at a roundtable titled “Faecal Sludge Management: Second Generation Sanitation Challenge” at The Daily Star Centre in the capital yesterday, jointly organised by the newspaper, DSK, ITN-Buet, and Practical Action. Photo: Star

The construction of thousands of pit latrines without thinking of ensuring proper hygienic separation of excreta from human contact and faecal sludge management (FSM) eventually emerged as a second generation sanitation problem for the country, they said at a programme at The Daily Star Centre in the capital.

Practical Action Bangladesh, ITN-Buet, Dushtha Shasthya Kendra (DSK) and The Daily Star jointly organised the programme.

Prof Muhammad Ashraf Ali, a teacher of Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, gave a keynote presentation on “Faecal Sludge Management: Key Issues and the Institution and Regulatory Framework.”

He mentioned that only four million or 20 percent of the total population of Dhaka city is currently under the sewerage network coverage while the rest 156 million are covered by on-site system. “In the absence of proper pit-emptying services in the latrines, the pit-contents are often drained into the surrounding low lying areas manually posing a great risk to cleaners and public health,” he observed.

Read the complete article.

An Update of Themes and Trends in Urban Community-Led Total Sanitation Projects

An Update of Themes and Trends in Urban Community-Led Total Sanitation Projects, 2015. 38th WEDC International Conference, Loughborough University, UK, 2015.

This briefing paper identifies common themes and trends of Urban Community-Led Total Sanitation (UCLTS). The study relies on literature from 14 different projects across India and Africa alongside articles that focused on UCLTS and participation in urban sanitation projects.

The hope is to provide an overview for those working in the field by identifying common characteristics, problems and opportunities.

The paper ends with a list of recommendations for those currently working on UCLTS projects and those interested in transferring the CLTS model to urban environments.

 

Tiger worm toilets: lessons learned from constructing household vermicomposting toilets in Liberia

Tiger worm toilets: lessons learned from constructing household vermicomposting toilets in Liberia. Waterlines, May 2016.

Authors: David Watako, Koslengar Mougabe, Thomas Heath.

In response to the poor urban sanitation in Monrovia’s slums and Buchanan’s peri-urban areas in Liberia, Oxfam piloted worm toilets (aka Tiger Toilets), constructing 180 toilets between 2011 and 2015. One toilet was constructed per household for families containing fewer than 10 people. Each toilet was connected to a biodigester containing 2 kg of African night crawlers (Eudrilus eugeniae).

This paper documents the programme approach including how the community was mobilized and the construction process. The results section reviews field observations, challenges, and the maintenance problems encountered. In the discussion the paper reviews the design changes, lessons learned, limits for scale, and critical factors for success (favourable environment, local supply, infiltration capacity, and local technicians).

The paper concludes that although the project is still ongoing, the study suggests that the African night crawlers can digest significant volumes of human excreta if proper conditions of aeration, moisture, and temperature are met.

 

UNC and P&G to Provide First Analysis of Environmental Health in Malawi Hospitals

UNC and P&G to Provide First Analysis of Environmental Health in Malawi Hospitals | Source: UNC News, May 15 2016 |

Millions of Malawians seek medical care in the country’s health care facilities each year. Yet, an analysis of the environmental health status in these facilities has never been performed. This summer, baseline measurements will be collected thanks to a partnership between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Procter & Gamble (P&G) through the Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program (CSDW).

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Patients being cared for at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Malawi.

“Health facilities should not be places to acquire infection due to lack of clean water, hygiene and sanitation; they should be places for cure,” says Innocent Mofolo, associate country director of UNC Project-Malawi. “WaSH should be part of an integrated approach to health and human development. This assessment will help determine WaSH gaps that exist in most of our health facilities and devise strategies to improve the situation.”

The assessment of 45 health facilities in the northern, central and southern regions of Malawi is being funded by a generous donation from P&G. Data collection will begin in August by researchers from the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases and its UNC Project in Malawi and the Water Institute at UNC.

Read the complete article.