Category Archives: Sanitary Facilities

An Update of Themes and Trends in Urban Community-Led Total Sanitation Projects

An Update of Themes and Trends in Urban Community-Led Total Sanitation Projects, 2015. 38th WEDC International Conference, Loughborough University, UK, 2015.

This briefing paper identifies common themes and trends of Urban Community-Led Total Sanitation (UCLTS). The study relies on literature from 14 different projects across India and Africa alongside articles that focused on UCLTS and participation in urban sanitation projects.

The hope is to provide an overview for those working in the field by identifying common characteristics, problems and opportunities.

The paper ends with a list of recommendations for those currently working on UCLTS projects and those interested in transferring the CLTS model to urban environments.

 

Tiger worm toilets: lessons learned from constructing household vermicomposting toilets in Liberia

Tiger worm toilets: lessons learned from constructing household vermicomposting toilets in Liberia. Waterlines, May 2016.

Authors: David Watako, Koslengar Mougabe, Thomas Heath.

In response to the poor urban sanitation in Monrovia’s slums and Buchanan’s peri-urban areas in Liberia, Oxfam piloted worm toilets (aka Tiger Toilets), constructing 180 toilets between 2011 and 2015. One toilet was constructed per household for families containing fewer than 10 people. Each toilet was connected to a biodigester containing 2 kg of African night crawlers (Eudrilus eugeniae).

This paper documents the programme approach including how the community was mobilized and the construction process. The results section reviews field observations, challenges, and the maintenance problems encountered. In the discussion the paper reviews the design changes, lessons learned, limits for scale, and critical factors for success (favourable environment, local supply, infiltration capacity, and local technicians).

The paper concludes that although the project is still ongoing, the study suggests that the African night crawlers can digest significant volumes of human excreta if proper conditions of aeration, moisture, and temperature are met.

 

UNC and P&G to Provide First Analysis of Environmental Health in Malawi Hospitals

UNC and P&G to Provide First Analysis of Environmental Health in Malawi Hospitals | Source: UNC News, May 15 2016 |

Millions of Malawians seek medical care in the country’s health care facilities each year. Yet, an analysis of the environmental health status in these facilities has never been performed. This summer, baseline measurements will be collected thanks to a partnership between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Procter & Gamble (P&G) through the Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program (CSDW).

malawi

Patients being cared for at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Malawi.

“Health facilities should not be places to acquire infection due to lack of clean water, hygiene and sanitation; they should be places for cure,” says Innocent Mofolo, associate country director of UNC Project-Malawi. “WaSH should be part of an integrated approach to health and human development. This assessment will help determine WaSH gaps that exist in most of our health facilities and devise strategies to improve the situation.”

The assessment of 45 health facilities in the northern, central and southern regions of Malawi is being funded by a generous donation from P&G. Data collection will begin in August by researchers from the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases and its UNC Project in Malawi and the Water Institute at UNC.

Read the complete article.

 

Sulabh Int’l Museum of Toilets: Offbeat, Bizarre, Fun-filled and Informative

Sulabh Int’l Museum of Toilets: Offbeat, Bizarre, Fun-filled and Informative | Source: Sulabh International, May 17 2016 |

A trip to the Sulabh International Museum of Toilets at Sulabh Gram in Delhi, is a fun filled walk through history of sanitation practices from across the world — an experience that is unique, somewhat bizarre and deeply informative. toilets_1454583070

The museum has on display more than 300 exhibits comprising of Photographs, models, originals, jokes, literature, replicas, cartoons and so on. It is also an important haunt for those researching on the subject of sanitation. As of now, there are a total of nine toilet museums in the world. Sulabh’s was the first such museum when it started in 1992.

This museum secured the 3rd position on TIME magazine’s ‘World’s 10 Weirdest Museums’ compiled in the magazine’s November, 2014, edition. Its popularity can be gauged by the fact that it receives approximately 10,000 visitors per year.

Varun Kumar, Assistant Curator at the museum, takes me on a study tour of the museum. Varun dispels the theory that the water closet flush toilet is a western invention.

Pointing to photographs of remains of the Harappan settlements, he explains: “WC flush toilet was invented in India. It was in use in India in the Harappan settlements since at least 2500 BC. It was a sitting water closet pour flushed toilet with a bucket of water acting as a flush due to which the excreta got drained into a covered drain which disposed it outside the city not contaminating the water sources or rivers”.

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Container-Based Sanitation Solutions Webinar – Stanford Water Health and Development

Published on Apr 11, 2016

On March 17, 2016 Water Health and Development hosted a webinar discussing Container Based Sanitation Solutions

 

Schools Promoting Learning Achievement through Sanitation and Hygiene – SPLASH

 

 

Seeking Sanitation Success – Improve International

Seeking Sanitation Success | Source: Improve International, May 2 2016 |

The sanitation sector has evolved over decades.  Yet, in 2015, the target year for the Millennium Development Goals, much remains to be done: 2.4 billion people lack access to improved sanitation and almost 1 billion people practice open defecation, nine out of ten in rural areas (WHO/UNICEF, 2015). seeking-sanitation-success-fact-sheet-p1

While some attempts to determine what works over time have been made, comparable information is scarce.  This is an important gap to overcome, and to overcome quickly, because Sustainable Development Goal 6 (UN) aims “to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all” in just 14 years.

The purpose of this meta-evaluation was to attempt to identify which sanitation approaches in developing countries have been effective and sustainable, so that sector actors can position themselves for achieving universal sanitation services.

This work is divided into two phases: the desk review and expert consultation (Phase I) and in-depth country case studies (Phase II). The Seeking Sanitation Successes Fact Sheet  summarizes the output of Phase I, which recommended countries for Phase II. Please get in touch if you are interested in collaborating on the Phase II research.

Read the complete article.