Category Archives: Wastewater Management

IHUWASH Accelerator India seeks high impact urban WASH innovations

India IHUWASH sanitationIndia IHUWASH hygiene

The IHUWASH Accelerator India program identifies and supports high-impact WASH business innovations to work with the city governments of Faridabad, Udaipur and Mysuru to solve pressing urban WASH problems.  Submissions should focus on one or more of the following urban WASH innovations:

  1. Safe drinking water
  2. Last-mile water distribution
  3. Recovering water supply costs
  4. Decentralised and improved sanitation solutions
  5. Improving public/community toilets
  6. Sustainable faecal waste treatment
  7. Hygiene behaviour change

Benefits for the selected innovations include opportunities to:

  • Roll out small-scale pilots that demonstrate your WASH innovation to governments
  • Work directly with key government officials, sector experts and impact investors
  • Showcase your innovation through a high visibility nation-wide program
  • Raise funds from private sector companies and impact investors

More program details are available here. Applications for the program are now open and they close on 22nd Jan 2018.

Please apply to the program (or) help identify relevant WASH business innovations by nominating them to chandrakant.komaragiri@ennovent.com.

About IHUWASH:

IHUWASH is a collaborative initiative between NIUATaruIRC and Ennovent. The three year project is supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and aims to improve the performance of urban WASH programs for India within a collaborative framework. Under IHUWASH, national and city-level Innovation Hubs are being established to work closely with the Faridabad, Mysuru and Udaipur city governments along with other national level WASH stakeholders.

The IHUWASH Accelerator builds on the experience of the 2016 Sanitation Innovation Accelerator in which Taru, IRC and Ennovent were also involved.

WSUP – A guide to strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management: experience from Bangladesh, Kenya and Zambia

A guide to strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management: experience from Bangladesh, Kenya and Zambia. WSUP, November 2017. wsup

This Guide presents an introduction to conceptualising and strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management (FSM) services in low-income urban areas.

It is based on WSUP’s experience working with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop market-based solutions for on-site sanitation services in the cities of Dhaka and Chittagong (Bangladesh), Kisumu (Kenya) and Lusaka (Zambia).

Why is FSM so important?

FSM is the process by which faecal sludge is contained, collected, transported, treated and then safely disposed of or reused. 2.7 billion (38%) people around the world are dependent on on-site sanitation facilities like pit latrines and septic tanks, which contain and partially treat faecal sludge on-site (as opposed to centralised systems like sewers that remove waste from households and transport it to treatment facilities).

Read the complete report.

Wastewater as a Resource Leaders Forum, 15 November 2017

As part of the IWA Water and Development Congress & Exhibition in Buenos Aires, there will be a special, invitation-only,  Leadership Forum on wastewater reuse:

Wastewater Management and Reuse to build Water Wise Cities: Innovative Solutions for Engagement, Planning and Investment, 15 November 2017

Co-organised with World Bank, CAF and IFC

The Forum will take place in three sessions that will lead to the development of a framework to be carried forward and presented at the World Water Forum in Brazil in 2018.

The three sessions are on:

  • The wastewater challenge and reuse opportunity
  • Unlocking barriers and enabling reuse and recovery – innovative solutions/cases
  • A vision and roadmap for wastewater management and reuse to 2030

Learn more and invitation

 

Wastewater/water reuse – Water Currents, August 22, 2017

Wastewater/water reuse – Water Currents, August 22, 2017.

This issue of Currents features articles and reports related to wastewater and water reuse, to tie in with the theme of World Water Week 2017 taking place in Stockholm, Sweden next week. This annual event brings together experts, practitioners, and decisionmakers from a range of sectors and countries to network, exchange ideas, and foster new thinking about global water issues. watercurrents

World Water Week, August 27–September 1, 2017. This year World Water Week, organized by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), will address the theme “water and waste: reduce and reuse.”

The conference website has links to the conference program, conference abstracts, conference newsletters, and other information. In addition, SIWI’s latest issue of its magazine Water Front contains articles on water reuse. Other conference events include the award of the 2017 Stockholm Water Prize to Stephen McCaffrey for his contributions to international water law.

USAID at World Water Week. USAID staff and partners will participate in events throughout the week. For information and a schedule see the conference preview on our new Globalwaters.org blog.

Articles and Reports
Potable Reuse: Guidance for Producing Safe Drinking-WaterWHO, August 2017. This document describes how to apply appropriate management systems to produce safe drinking water from municipal wastewater. Information is provided on specific aspects of potable reuse, including the quality and protection of source wastewaters and types of control measures.

Read the complete issue.

Tender: Sanitation solutions for underserved communities in Jordan

The project, initiated by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), focuses on rethinking sanitation systems, by improving existing Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTP) and exploring the development of small scale Waste Water Treatment (WWT) and Faecal Sludge Treatment (FST) solutions. The goal of these improvements and developments is to increase WWT efficiency and sanitation coverage, and turn waste streams into physical and financial resource streams by ensuring and promoting safe reuse of the treated wastewater and faecal sludge. The focus is on Jordanian host communities as a whole, with a particular attention to be paid to unserved, vulnerable communities, as they are more and more impacted by the lack of adequate sanitation systems. The project will be subdivided into two distinct phases – the inception phase and the main phase.

Project ID 157868|Notice no. 975947

Deadline for submission of the complete bid: 28 August 2017

View the full notice at:
www.simap.ch/shabforms/COMMON/search/searchresult.jsf

A defining moment for the future of wastewater?

A defining moment for the future of wastewater? IWA Source, June 2017.

By Pritha Hariram*

As we mark the international year of Wastewater, I’m taken back to my childhood crossing the Adayar Bridge in Chennai, India, in an air-conditioned “Ambassador” (the iconic Indian car that served as high-end taxis in the 80s). The airtight car windows and cool air-conditioning provided little protection from the stench coming from the river, reduced to trickle passing under the bridge on its way to making a very undramatic entrance into the Bay of Bengal. Wastewater-insight-696x389.png

On that hot summer day as I sat in my “protected” Ambassador with my family, the Adayar river, once the economic and cultural backbone of Chennai, was reduced to nothing but an active landfill and untreated wastewater discharge zone. To complement the stench, the sight was unbearable, resembling a large septic tank of sludgy consistency filled with debris. Thankfully, the story of Adayar and its estuarine extension, the Coum river, does not end there.

Fast-forward to 2012, and a large, citizen-driven petition led by local NGO, the Consumer Action Group, successfully persuaded the Tamil Nadu government to take action. This has resulted in the development and implementation of a large-scale restoration programme that began with the construction of over 300 sewage treatment plants. This was followed by an eco-restoration phase, including the plantation of mangroves along the estuary stretch of the rivers. The programme is now in its third phase with continued eco-restoration and de-silting of the riverbeds.

This combination of nature based solutions and grey infrastructure has become a flagship project for Tamil Nadu, and serves as an eco-restoration model to be replicated in the rest of the southern Indian state. It’s also a timely reminder for the rest of the world, of what can be achieved when citizens and governments come together to press for change.

Read the complete article.

Global use of wastewater to irrigate agriculture at least 50 percent greater than thought

Global use of wastewater to irrigate agriculture at least 50 percent greater than thought. Phys.org, July 2017.

The use of untreated wastewater from cities to irrigate crops downstream is 50 percent more widespread than previously thought, according to a new study published this week in the journal Environmental Research Letters.

agriculture

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

The study relies on advanced modeling methods to provide the first truly comprehensive estimate of the global extent to which farmers use urban wastewater on irrigated cropland. Researchers analyzed data with geographic information systems (GIS) rather than depending on case study results, as in previous studies.

The researchers also assessed for the first time ‘indirect reuse’, which occurs when wastewater gets diluted but still remains a dominant component of surface water flows. Such situations account for the majority of agricultural water reuse worldwide, but have been difficult to quantify on a global level due to different views of what constitutes diluted wastewater versus polluted water.

Read the complete article.