Category Archives: Wastewater Management

Positive Progress: 3 Trends in Wastewater Treatment

Positive Progress: 3 Trends in Wastewater Treatment |Source: Ralph Exton, Triple Pundit, July 5 2016 |

Water has become one of the foremost challenges affecting the world today. In developing countries, millions of people lack access to clean, safe water. Weather extremes, such as drought are creating dangerous situations; meanwhile, a new released report predicts that by year 2060, more than a billion people worldwide will live in cities at risk of major flooding as a result of climate change. drops-of-water-578897_1280-1

Then there’s the rapid population growth and economic development in regions, such as the Middle East, where water resources are being pushed well beyond natural limits. And as cities’ aging piping and distribution infrastructure continues to crumble, trillions of gallons of water are lost.

Municipalities in particular are taking the brunt of these challenges. Yet, I believe some of the greatest opportunities for solving the problems exist within their wastewater treatment plants. Last month, leaders in the global water sector convened in Munich, Germany, for the 50th anniversary of IFAT – an influential conference for innovation in water, sewage, waste and raw materials management. Three wastewater treatment trends – and solutions – dominated the discussion.

Read the complete article.

Identification and quantification of pathogenic helminth eggs using a digital image system

Identification and quantification of pathogenic helminth eggs using a digital image system. Experimental Parasitology, July 2016.

Authors: B. Jiméneza, C. Maya, et. al.

A system was developed to identify and quantify up to seven species of helminth eggs (Ascaris lumbricoides -fertile and unfertile eggs-, Trichuris trichiura, Toxocara canis, Taenia saginata, Hymenolepis nana, Hymenolepis diminuta, and Schistosoma mansoni) in wastewater using different image processing tools and pattern recognition algorithms.

The system allows the helminth eggs most commonly found in wastewater to be reliably and uniformly detected and quantified. In addition, it provides the total number of eggs as well as the individual number by species, and for Ascaris lumbricoides it differentiates whether or not the egg is fertile.

The system only requires basically trained technicians to prepare the samples, as for visual identification there is no need for highly trained personnel. The time required to analyze each image is less than a minute. This system could be used in central analytical laboratories providing a remote analysis service.

 

Startup Focused On Home Wastewater Reuse With ‘Biopipe’

Startup Focused On Home Wastewater Reuse With ‘Biopipe’ | Source: Water Online, April 21 2016 |

Should every home purify its own wastewater? A startup from young Turkish entrepreneurs says yes. 375_250-innovation_reg.png

Enes Kutluca, one of the founders, believes far too little wastewater is being reused. The global production of wastewater stands at about 165 billion cubic meters each day, and only about 2 percent gets recycled, according to Daily Sabah, an English-language daily newspaper published in Turkey.

“I think the wastewater treatment systems on the market have evolved in the wrong way,” Kutluca toldDaily Sabah. “There’s no sustainable wastewater treatment system that is suitable for everyone. People are thinking wastewater treatment is a luxury to have in homes.”

Kutluca observed that the sewer systems of modern cities are not efficient. For him, that was the starting point for innovation.

“We collect all wastewater from all houses with sewage networks, build kilometers of collection pipes and giant wastewater treatment plants. All of these cost millions of dollars and they don’t even use the treated water. We just let this usable water flow into seas and oceans. So, I started thinking that collecting wastewater from each house is not the best solution. What if I invent a wastewater treatment system that enables all houses to treat their own wastewater and reuse it again in their homes?” he said, per the report.

Enter Biopipe, a technology designed by Kutluca’s firm meant to solve this problem. Biopipe claims it is the world’s first and only sewage treatment pipe. How is works, as explained by Kutluca to Daily Sabah:

“Biopipe is the only innovative wastewater treatment system that does not produce sludge and it is patented in more than 55 countries. It is the result of years of research and development that has now become one of the most sustainable, eco-friendly and cost-effective wastewater treatment solutions in the world,” he said and added: “Today treatment systems on the market are complicated, expensive and not custom designed. Biopipe has a simple, innovative design, which is based around a natural treatment mechanism, and performed inside a pipe with the help of good bacteria without the need for any additional chemicals.”

Read the complete article.

VIA Water second faecal sludge webinar report

Which technical options are available for the reuse of faecal sludge? Report of a VIA Water webinar led by Jan Spit.

foto_faecal_sludge_0

© S. Blume/SuSanA Secretariat

Report on the webinar: read the questions that were asked before and during the webinar, and Jan Spit’s answers to them:

  1. D2B: http://english.rvo.nl/subsidies-programmes/develop2build-d2b
  2. DRIVE: http://english.rvo.nl/subsidies-programmes/development-related-infrastructure-investment-vehicle-drive

In Germany: KfW: https://www.kfw.de/International-financing/. For innovative funding, look at: http://www.traidwheel.nl/appropriate-finance/Innovative-financing-mechanisms

Continue reading

Webinar faecal sludge, 15 December 2015

VIA Water is organising a webinar on faecal sludge on 15 December 2015 at 14:00 hours CET (UCT +1).

In this webinar you will be able to discuss any issue you might have run into during your work on this topic, and ask VIA Water expert Jan Spit any question you might have. Jan will also kick off by sharing some of his insights. For more information about his background, visit his website.

Check out Jan’s invitation in the short clip below. On the 15th, you will be able to access the webinar through this link: http://bbb.ihe.nl/demo/create.jsp?action=invite&meetingID=VIA+Water+Webinar%27s+meeting

About Via Water

Via Water is a knowledge platform on water and develolpment funded by the Dutch government. It supports projects with innovative solutions for water problems facing cities in seven African countries: Benin, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Mozambique, Rwanda and South Sudan. To learn more go to: www.viawater.nl/about-via-water

Introduction to the Treatment of Urban Sewage – free online course

TU Delft offers a free 7 week online introductory course on urban sewage treatment starting in April 2016.

The course consists of 6 modules:

  1. Sewage treatment plant overview
  2. Primary treatment
  3. Biological treatment
  4. Activated sludge process
  5. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal
  6. Sludge treatment

The instructors are Prof. Jules van Lier, Environmental Engineering and Wastewater Treatment, and wastewater Assistant Prof. Merle de Kreuk.

View the course introduction video

Introduction to the Treatment of Urban Sewage is part of TU Delft Water Management XSeries on edX.

For $50 participants can get a Verified Certificate for the course.

Discussion on a new SNV/ISF learning paper on “Septage Transfer Stations”

On Wednesday 24 June a discussion on a new SNV/ISF learning paper, namely on Septage Transfer Stations, is starting. This discussion will be running on the Faecal sludge transport sub-category of the sanitation systems group category on the SuSanA Forum and in parallel also on the WASH Asia urban san Dgroup.

The topic of Septage Transfer Stations has come up as one of the learning priorities, because it is an essential part of a faecal sludge management solution in cities with narrow roads and large distances to treatment facilities. In this learning paper we brought together existing knowledge on this topic, and we found out that there are only a few good examples. Through this discussion we are not only hoping to share the paper, but also to add examples and insight to it from your collective experience.

What will we discuss?

There will be 3 topics and each topic will run for one week, from Wednesday till Tuesday. At the end of the discussion, we’ll make a summary paper as input for the workshop. Below are the three topics.

Week dates topic

Week 1: 24 June- 30 June Different options for septage transfer stations

Week 2: 1 July- 7 July General considerations for septage transfer stations

Week 3: 8 July-14 July Reflections on management arrangements for septage transfer stations

After the discussion, we will share an updated version of the learning paper on Septage Transfer Stations.

How does it work?

We are making the full learning paper available to you on the Faecal sludge transport subgroup and the SuSanA Discussion Forum.

In addition to this, we will break up the information according to the above blocks. On the first day of the discussion, 24 June, you will find some questions in your inbox. Everybody is invited to share their ideas, comments and examples, responding to the message. All experiences and opinions are welcome and please don’t be shy to contribute.

On the last day of each discussion week, each Tuesday, all messages of the week will be processed and integrated into a chapter of the summary document. This will be the same for all 3 topics.

For more information please visit the SuSanA Forum.

Looking forward to hear from all of you over the coming weeks!