Category Archives: East Asia & Pacific

WSSCC Releases New Global Sanitation Fund Equality and Non-Discrimination Study

How can WASH programmes leave no one behind, as called for in the Sustaionable Development Goals? WSSCC’s new study, Scoping and Diagnosis of the Global Sanitation Fund’s Approach to Equality and Non-Discrimination, helps answer this question.

The study reveals that many people who may be considered disadvantaged have benefited positively from WSSCC’s Global Sanitation Fund (GSF)-supported programmes, particularly in open defecation free verified areas. In addition, a range of positive outcomes and impacts related to empowerment, safety, convenience, ease of use, self-esteem, health, dignity, an improved environment and income generation were reported by people who may be considered disadvantaged.

EQND-Article-Slider
Photo Credit: WSSCC

However, the study finds that GSF has not yet systematically integrated EQND throughout the programme cycle. Across all countries, there are people who have either fallen through the net or whose lives have become more difficult after being unduly pressured, or after taking out loans and selling assets to build toilets. More proactive attention is needed throughout the programme cycle to build on current successes and ensure that people are not left behind or harmed through the actions or omissions of supported programmes.

GSF is in the process of putting the study’s recommendations into practice through revised guidelines, minimum standards, practical tools and other mechanisms.

Download the full study, plus a summarized version with GSF reflections, and annexes

The Business – A blog on sanitation marketing

The Business: Knowledge and Learning on Sanitation Marketing

The Western Pacific Sanitation Marketing and Innovation Program is funded by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) CS-WASH Fund, implemented by Live & Learn Environmental Education in partnership with The International Water Centre (IWC), and the International Women’s Development Agency (IWDA).

Recent posts to The Business include:

E-Waste In Asia Jumps 63 Percent In Five Years

E-Waste In Asia Jumps 63 Percent In Five Years. Asian Scientists, January 17, 2017.

In just five years, Asian countries produced 12.3 million tonnes of e-waste, a weight 2.4 times that of the Great Pyramid of Giza. landfill-electronic-waste-3328c9b1kashqi20iylpts

AsianScientist (Jan. 17, 2017) – The volume of discarded electronics in East and Southeast Asia jumped almost two-thirds between 2010 and 2015, and e-waste generation is growing fast in both total volume and per capita measures, according to research by the United Nations (UN) University.

The average increase in e-waste across all 12 countries and areas analyzed—Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam—was 63 percent in the five years ending in 2015 and totalled 12.3 million tonnes, a weight 2.4 times that of the Great Pyramid of Giza.

China alone more than doubled its generation of e-waste between 2010 and 2015 to 6.7 million tonnes, up 107 percent. Using UN University’s estimation methodology, the research shows rising e-waste quantities outpacing population growth.

Read the complete article.

UNESCO funds Dunedin shadow puppet film in Indonesia about hygiene

Published on Jan 16, 2017
UNESCO along with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade are financially backing a trans-Tasman project to improve hygiene in Indonesia.

An educational film is being made in Dunedin featuring Javanese shadow puppets who tell the tale of evil bacteria.

Today some top musicians began adding the soundtrack.

 

Implementer’s Guide to Lime Stabilization for Septage Management in the Philippines

Implementer’s Guide to Lime Stabilization for Septage Management in the Philippines, 2015. 

This report has been prepared for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), under the Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability (Be Secure) Project, Contract No. AID-492-C-13-00015

The USAID Be Secure Project is grateful all who were involved in the creation of this Implementer’s Guide to Lime Stabilization for Septage Management in the Philippines. This guide is a result of collaboration and input from a dedicated team and group of advisors.

This manual is for implementers – the person on the ground who makes things happen. You may be:

  • A municipal or city government staff person, such as the City
    or Municipal Environmental Officer (CENRO or MENRO), engineer,
    planner, or health officer tasked by the mayor with setting up a
    septage management program.
  • A water service provider, such as a water district, mandated to
    provide sanitation services to its customers.
  • A disaster preparedness specialist, responsible for managing fecal
    sludge and septage following natural or manmade disasters.
  • A private sector service provider interested in providing septage
    collection or treatment services as a business opportunity.

Sanitation projects will go down the toilet unless we ask people what they really want

Sanitation projects will go down the toilet unless we ask people what they really want. The Conversation, November 27, 2016.

Countries have a lot of work to do to achieve the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. But development projects don’t always go the way you expect.

A resettlement project in Laos provided taps and toilets as a way to improve hygiene and health outcomes for communities.

stages

Stages of water development project planning. GCI/UQ

Three years after resettlement a project team formed to address health issues found that the new brick toilet facilities were being used to store rice. The practice of “open defecation” was continuing in nearby farmland.

The community members explained that keeping rice dry and safe from animals was their highest priority. They also thought it was more hygienic for faeces to be washed away, rather than concentrated in one place such as a toilet.

How did this mismatch occur? There had been limited community participation, no awareness-raising and no sense of community ownership generated during the project planning. Getting these things right will be fundamental to achieving any of the development goals.

Read the complete article.

USAID; IUCN – Viet Nam: Ha Long Bay boat waste collection and treatment

Viet Nam: Ha Long Bay boat waste collection and treatment: final report, 2016. USAID; IUCN.

INTRODUCTION
There are approximately 500 boats cruising through the bay waters, of which about 300 are dayboat and 200 are overnight-boats. In this report, bay waters refers to the three bays: Ha Long, Bai Tu Long and Lan Ha. Many of the boats that operate in the bay can be compared to floating hotels and thus generate lots of waste: both solid waste and waste water but also air pollutants (black fumes) and noise pollution.

Waste water includes black water (toilet waste), grey water (wastewater from sinks, baths,
showers and laundry) and bilge water (oily water that accumulates in the lowest part of a
ship). Hereafter, we identify and recommend concrete solutions to collect and treat waste water from such cruise boats and remove floating waste from the bay’s water. Indeed, it is necessary to implement active and concrete measures in order to address the decreasing environmental quality of the Ha Long Bay and restore the unique natural beauty of this important tourist location and World Heritage Site.

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