Category Archives: South Asia

CARE/Bangladesh -Towards Total Sanitation

 

WSUP – Behavior change in Dhaka

 

UNICEF – Water, sanitation, and hygiene, champions in Afghanistan

Published on Jan 12, 2016

Zibulnissa, and Sedef, two female high school students from Afghanistan, attended in the first student-led conference on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in South Asia in 2015 in Sri Lanka’s capital, Colombo.

The conference brought together students from South Asia to share their views on how they can improve the use of safe drinking water, clean toilets, and handwashing in their countries, and enable them to advocate for recommendations to be incorporated into government policy and agendas.

Sanitation giant Dr. Babar Kabir dies

Babar-Kabir

Babar Kabir. Photo: BRAC

The former senior director of BRAC’s disaster management and climate change (DMCC) and water  sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programmes, Dr Babar Kabir, died on 15 January 2015.  Under his leadership more than 37 million people in Bangladesh were provided with hygienic sanitation and another two million with access to safe water through the BRAC WASH Programme.

IRC has been a knowledge partner of BRAC WASH since 2006. Thanks to Dr. Kabir, BRAC supported IRC’s contributions to Sanitation Updates from 2012-2015.

In 2013, Dr. Kabir gave this short video interview about the BRAC WASH programme for WaterCouchTV.

In 2014, Dr. Kabir left BRAC. He recently became Bangladesh Country Director for Water.org

Babar Kabir is survived by his wife and two daughters.

For more information read the obituaries on the websites of BRAC and IRC.

Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth and Environmental Enteropathy in Bangladeshi Children

Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth and Environmental Enteropathy in Bangladeshi Children. mBio, Jan 2016

Authors: Jeffrey R. Donowitz, Rashidul Haque, et al.

Recent studies suggest small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is common among developing world children. SIBO’s pathogenesis and effect in the developing world are unclear. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of SIBO in Bangladeshi children and its association with malnutrition. Secondary objectives included determination of SIBO’s association with sanitation, diarrheal disease, and environmental enteropathy.

The strongest predictors of SIBO were decreased length-for-age Z score since birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03 to 0.60) and an open sewer outside the home (OR, 4.78; 95% CI, 1.06 to 21.62). Recent or frequent diarrheal disease did not predict SIBO. The markers of intestinal inflammation fecal Reg 1β (116.8 versus 65.6 µg/ml; P = 0.02) and fecal calprotectin (1,834.6 versus 766.7 µg/g; P = 0.004) were elevated in SIBO-positive children. Measures of intestinal permeability and systemic inflammation did not differ between the groups.

These findings suggest linear growth faltering and poor sanitation are associated with SIBO independently of recent or frequent diarrheal disease. SIBO is associated with intestinal inflammation but not increased permeability or systemic inflammation.

Sanitation and child health in India

Sanitation and child health in India, 2015. Britta Augsburg (IFS) and Paul Rodriguez-Lesmes (UCL).

Our study contributes to the understanding of key drivers of stunted growth, a factor widely recognized as major impediment to human capital development. Specifically, we examine the effects of sanitation coverage and usage on child height for age in a semi-urban setting in Northern India.

We use instrumental variables to control for endogeneity of sanitation usage coverage. We find that sanitation coverage plays a significant and positive role in height growth during the first years of life.

Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability: Nepal Learning Brief

Nepal UNC

Pour Flush Toilet in Nepal. Photo Credit: Vidya Venkataramanan

Plan International supports Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) implementation in a number of districts in Nepal. In this learning brief, we review Plan International Nepal’s CLTS activities. We found government targets and definitions to be ambitious while decentralized planning allowed a focus on community-led processes. Plan International and other sanitation practitioners can support CLTS outcomes by providing post-triggering training and technical support to community volunteers, focusing on achieving gradual, yet sustained outcomes in program areas, and continuing to work with local governments to ensure that financing mechanisms for the poor are locally developed and equitable.

Link to learning brief: https://waterinstitute.unc.edu/files/2015/11/learning-series-nepal-learning-brief-2015-11.pdf

Citation: Community-led Total Sanitation in Nepal: Findings from an Implementation Case Study. Venkataramanan, Vidya, Alexandra Shannon, and Jennifer Bogle. 2015. Chapel Hill, USA: The Water Institute at UNC.