Category Archives: Resources

Ghaziabad administration launches ‘Swachhtagrah’ app to monitor open defecation

Ghaziabad administration launches ‘Swachhtagrah’ app to monitor open defecation. Hindustan Times, April 13, 2017.

The Ghaziabad district administration on Thursday launched a mobile app to help officials locate areas where people defecate in the open. Volunteers and monitoring committees will now be able to send complaints and Google map locations of open defecation.

app

Incidents of open defecation can be reported in the app.

According to officials, the ‘Swachhagrah’ app is available on the Google play store but its use will be restricted to use by volunteers and monitoring committee members registered with the district open defecation free (ODF) control room.

The officials aim to provide a total of 12,969 toilets by the end of April as part of the ODF programme. As many as 111 of 196 villages in the district are open defecation-free.

“Once we achieve the ODF status in all of our 196 villages, the app will help volunteers and monitoring committees to check if people are returning to old habits.

They, after providing their login and password, can send complaints and even the location through the app. The complaint will be displayed to all officials and also in the control room,” said Virendra Singh, district Panchayati Raj officer.

Read the complete article.

Recent WASH research

Financing WASH SystemsIRC WASH, March 2017. In this podcast two experts talk about the challenges of financing water and sanitation services and the importance of public finance in reaching the Sustainable Development Goals.

World Water Development Report (WWDR) 2017—Wastewater: An Untapped ResourceUN Water, March 2017. This year’s WWDR report proposes that the vast quantities of domestic, agricultural, and industrial wastewater discharged into the environment be used as a valuable resource.

Turbulent Waters: Pursuing Water Security in Fragile ContextsThe World Bank, March 2017. This report explores the dynamics between water insecurity and fragility. It suggests that water security is more difficult to achieve in fragile contexts because of a range of factors, including weak institutions and information systems, strained human and financial resources, and degraded infrastructure.

Interventions to Improve Facial Cleanliness and Environmental Improvement for Trachoma Prevention and Control: Review of the Grey Literature. International Coalition for Trachoma Control, March 2017. This report reflects a review and synthesis of the F (facial cleanliness) and E (environmental improvement) intervention landscape, as indicated by grey literature produced by the trachoma community.

Effects of Neighbourhood and Household Sanitation Conditions on Diarrhea Morbidity: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. PLoS One, March 2017. The findings suggest that, in addition to household sanitation provision, dual emphasis on neighborhood sanitation through public sanitation infrastructure provision and community-wide sanitation adoption is advisable to effectively reduce the diarrheal disease burden.

A Systematic Review: Costing and Financing of Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) in SchoolsPreprints, March 2017. The purpose of this review is to describe the current knowledge around the costs of WASH components as well as financing models that could be applied to WASH in schools. Results show a lack of information around WASH costing, particularly around software elements. Data are lacking overall for WASH in school settings compared to community WASH.

Sub-Saharan Africa’s Urban Water Blueprint: Securing Water through Water Funds and Other Investments in Ecological InfrastructureThe Nature Conservancy, 2016. This assessment demonstrates that catchment protection can play an important role in improving the quality and quantity of water for cities across sub-Saharan Africa. These benefits extend beyond the cities themselves to help sustain rural livelihoods and huge areas of critical biodiversity.

A Listing of World Water Day 2017 PublicationsSanitation Updates, March 2017. This post to Sanitation Updates compiles links to World Water Day 2017 reports from WaterAid, UN Water, WHO, and others

A financially viable and safe solution for managing human waste

Collecting small monthly payments will help waste collectors build their business.

Bangladesh - pit latrine empytiers

Pit latrine workers in Bangladesh collecting and transporting human waste to a site where it is processed into fertiliser. Image: Neil Palmer (IWMI). Credit: University of Leeds

Spreading the cost of emptying pit latrines over a series of monthly payments could make it more affordable for poor households and help kick start the safe reuse of faecal sludge as fertiliser and biogas. This is the conclusion of a willingness-to-pay study carried out in a rural sub-district of Bangladesh covered by the BRAC WASH Programme II.

The study has already caught the attention of policymakers, and influenced the development of Bangladesh’s first regulatory framework for faecal sludge management. Some of the authors are members of the Bangladesh National Committee for Fecal Sludge Management.

Currently, households struggle to pay a lump sum of US$13 every three to four years to empty their pit latrines. This is approximately 14% of their monthly income. Instead, the study found they could pay small monthly payments of as little as US$ 0.31 per month, comparable to what they spend each month on a mobile phone service. These up-front payments help waste collectors to invest in the development of their service. Nevertheless, a government subsidy would still be needed to cover the full cost of safe removal and transport of faecal sludge.

As mentioned above, there is potential for waste collectors to generate extra revenue by converting faecal waste into fertiliser and biogas. The profitability of these waste by-products, however, can be effected by existing subsidies for chemical fertilisers and conventional fuels. Another factor that can reduce profitability is the low energy or calorific value of human waste compared to other organic wastes. A companion study carried out as part of the BRAC WASH Programme II tested solutions to increase the calorific value by co-processing human waste with other agricultural wastes.

The willingness-to-pay study is an output of the Value at the end of the Sanitation Value Chain (VeSV) research project, lead by the University of Leeds. VeSV was one of six action research projects funded by the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (Bangladesh) through IRC. Additional funding was provided by the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

For more information read “Spreading the cost to transform sanitation“, published by the University of Leed’s School of Civil Engineering, 22 March 2017.

Citation: Balasubramanya S, et al. (2017) Towards sustainable sanitation management : establishing the costs and willingness to pay for emptying and transporting sludge in rural districts with high rates of access to latrines. PLoS ONE 12(3): e0171735. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0171735

This news item was originally published on the IRC website, 27 March 2017.

Toilet Accelerator & SaTo toilet products named as finalists in the first-ever World Changing Ideas Awards

Announcing The Winners Of The 2017 World Changing Ideas Awards.  Fast Company, March 20, 2017.

Our 25 expert judges combed through more than 1,000 entries from around the world to find the most innovative ideas to make the world better. poster

Here they are: the winners of the first-ever World Changing Ideas Awards. We sifted through more than 1,000 truly impressive entries to find the ones our panel of judges thought were the best combination of creative problem solving and potential to change our world for the better. We have crowned 12 winners–along with 192 finalists–which you can read more about below (make sure you also read our predictions for the world changing ideas of next year). Each of these projects represents the best of social entrepreneurship, where innovation and impact are intersecting.

SOME OF THE WORLD CHANGING IDEA FINALISTS

The Toilet Accelerator
Toilet Board Coalition
Supporting innovation in sanitation

Edible six-pack rings
E6PR
Packaging that breaks down in water

SaTo sanitary toilet products
Lixil
Low-cost sanitation for developing countries

Read the complete article.

12th SuSanA Thematic Discussion: “Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in Schools – A neglected issue”

While nowadays the topic of MHM is gaining more and more attention, it has widely been neglected in the past. SDG4 (education), SDG5 (gender equality) and SDG6 (water and sanitation) require female friendly sanitation facilities and available informational materials at schools around the globe.

Taking into account the magnitude of the population affected by issues around MHM, schools provide an ideal environment to reach girls as well as young women and to address taboos and misconceptions in a culturally sensitive manner.

The question, however, is how to approach the topic in a culturally sensitive manner?

Running for two weeks from today (March 27 until April 09) the discussion on the SuSanA forum will look at two areas:

Week 1: Breaking the taboo around MHM                                           Thematic Lead: Dr. Marni Sommer (Associate Professor, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health)

 Week 2: Infrastructural barriers and how to monitor MHM            Thematic Lead: Thérèse Mahon (Regional Programme Manager South Asia, WaterAid)

During the discussion, regular summaries of forum entries will be posted to keep you updated on our conversation.

Coordination on behalf of the SuSanA secretariat for this thematic discussion will be carried out by Dr. Bella Monse, Jan Schlenk and Mintje Büürma. For any questions, you can post on the forum or contact us directly at info@susana.org.

To join the discussion, follow: http://bit.ly/2nZn4n6

And to read the first contribution by Marni Sommer, click on: http://bit.ly/2n9JLkv

Wikipedia – World Water Day

World Water Day is an annual event celebrated on 22 March. The day focuses attention on the importance of universal access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities in developing countries.[1] The day also focuses on advocating for the sustainable management of freshwater resources.[2] 

World water day

A World Water Day celebration in Kenya in 2010

World Water Day is supported by stakeholders across the globe. Many organizations promote clean water for people and sustainable aquatic habitats. Events such as theatrical and musical celebrations, educational events, and campaigns to raise money for access to clean and affordable water are held worldwide on or close to 22 March.[3]

UN-Water selects a theme for each year.[4] Previous themes included: ‘Why waste water?’ (a play on words with ‘Why wastewater?’) in 2017, ‘Water and Jobs’ in 2016, and ‘Water and Sustainable Development’ in 2015.

The first International World Water Day, designated by the United Nations, was commemorated in 1993.[5]

Read the complete article on Wikipedia.

World Water Day 2017 publications by USAID, UN Water, WaterAid, Wikipedia and others

Please let me know if you have others that should be added to the list

Dan Campbell
Knowledge Creation/WASH Specialist, ECODIT
USAID Water Communications and Knowledge Management (CKM) Project
Implemented by a Consortium led by ECODIT
Email: dcampbell@waterckm.com

Join us on @USAIDWater and Global Waters on Medium