Category Archives: Resources

Water, sanitation and hygiene in health care facilities

A new report by the World Health Organization (WHO and Unicef provides an “alarming picture of the state of WASH in health care facilities”.

Drawing on limited data from 54 low- and middle-income countries the report concludes that 38% of the facilities lack access to even rudimentary levels of water, 19% lack sanitation and 35% do not have water and soap for handwashing.

In addition, “training and capacity building to ensure there are sufficient resources and personnel to operate and maintain WASH facilities and enable health care staff to deliver hygiene behaviour change messages is urgently needed”, the report says.

“While the situation appears bleak, there are a number of global initiatives for which WASH in health care facilities is a foundational element and examples of national governments taking the initiative to improve standards, implementation and monitoring”, the report concludes. Through coordinated, global action, with leadership from the health sector, WHO and Unicef believe that all health care facilities can have adequate WASH services.

Besides the full report, you can also download:

Cronk, R. & Bartram, J., 2015. Water, sanitation and hygiene in health care facilities : status in low and middle income countries and way forward, Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization (WHO) and Unicef. x, 38 p. : 8 boxes, 2 fig, 8 tab. Avaialable at:
www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/publications/wash-health-care-facilities/en/

How Bangladesh turns toilet waste into high-value compost – in pictures

How Bangladesh turns toilet waste into high-value compost – in pictures |Source: The Guardian, Feb 27 2015 |

Scientists in Bangladesh are working on ways to treat toilet waste in rural areas and use it to develop safe, nutritious compost for food crops. Led by the school of civil engineering at Leeds University, the Value at the End of the Sanitation Value-Chain (VESV) project aims to help reduce reliance on imported inorganic fertilisers and provide potential business opportunities for waste transporters and compost producers in a country where access to sanitation is now widespread but challenges of managing waste remain.

Farmers tend their cabbage crops in Manikganj district. Bangladesh has benefited from major improvements in rural sanitation with the spread of pit toilets – holes dug in the ground. guardian-sanitation

These bypass the problem of installing sewerage infrastructure in densely populated rural areas, but the challenge is what to do with the waste when the pits are full. If treated carefully, this waste could provide a local source of organic matter and plant nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus. All photographs by Neil Palmer/IWMI.

Feb/March 2015 selected studies on sanitation, hygiene & handwashing

TROPICAL MEDICINE & INTERNATIONAL HEALTH – FEB/MAR 2015

Household-Level Risk Factors for Influenza among Young Children in Dhaka, Bangladesh: A Case-Control Study(Abstract/order)

To identify household-level factors associated with influenza among young children in a crowded community in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Case households were more likely than controls to have crowded (≥4 persons) sleeping areas and cross-ventilated cooking spaces. Case and control households had similar median 24-hour geometric mean PM2.5 concentrations in the cooking and sleeping spaces. Handwashing with soap was practiced infrequently, and was not associated with pediatric influenza in this community. Interventions aimed at crowded households may reduce influenza incidence in young children.

Getting the basic rights – the role of water, sanitation and hygiene in maternal and reproductive health: a conceptual framework. (Full text)
WASH affects the risk of adverse maternal and perinatal health outcomes; these exposures are multiple and overlapping and may be distant from the immediate health outcome. Much of the evidence is weak, based on observational studies and anecdotal evidence, with relatively few systematic reviews. New systematic reviews are required to assess the quality of existing evidence more rigorously, and primary research is required to investigate the magnitude of effects of particular WASH exposures on specific maternal and perinatal outcomes.

LANCET INFECTIOUS DISEASES – FEB 2015

Editorial – Prioritising clean water and sanitation (Free full text but registration required)
Sanitation is the single greatest human achievement with regard to health, yet in much of the world it is underappreciated or inaccessible. Talha Burki investigates. “Currently, the popular approaches to sanitation place a lot of responsibility on individuals and households and not as much on governments”, adds WaterAid’s Yael Velleman. In the UK, it was legislation that led to universal access to improved sanitation. “Ultimately, it was political will and public finance that pushed that drive—I wonder whether we now expect low-income countries to do something we have never done ourselves”, said Velleman. Pollock advocates a return to a health-for-all approach, attending to the building blocks of public health, such as sanitation and nutrition, and directing major investment into infrastructure and monitoring systems. “I can’t understand why we’re prioritising clinical trials in Africa, and not prioritising clean water”, she told The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Pakistan president to open national sanitation conference PACOSAN II

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President Mamnoon Hussain will inaugurate the 2nd Pakistan Conference on Sanitation (PACOSAN II) that is being held from 17-18 February 2015 at the Sareena Hotel in Islamabad.

PACOSAN II is organised by the Ministry of Climate Change, with the support of WaterAid, UNICEF, Water and Sanitation Program – South Asia (WSP-SA), Plan Pakistan and other sector partners.

Even though Pakistan has achieved a significant reduction in open defecation, it is still practised by 41 million people.

The 1st national sanitation conference PACOSAN I took place in May 2009 – see a conference report on the WSP website.

Follow updates on Twitter at @PACOSAN_II and on Facebook.

Sanitation monitoring – what role for the sanitation ladder? Join the discussion!

The Sanitation Ladder

Sustainable Sanitation Alliance is holding a 3-week thematic discussion on the topic: the sanitation ladder

“The Sanitation Ladder: Next Steps” thematic discussion is the first discussion in the newly launched Thematic Discussion Series from the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA)!

This first thematic discussion is taking place from February 9-27 2015 on the SuSanA Discussion Forum. Up-to-date bi-weekly summaries of the discussions will be posted.  On Thursday, February 20th, a webinar will be led by the thematic leads to discuss the key issues from the discussion. The exact time of the webinar will be posted next week.

The discussion focuses on the development of the sanitation ladder, the post-2015 agenda and monitoring challenges, and the way forward. Three thematic experts are providing leadership throughout the discussions: Patrick Bracken, a Water and Sanitation Specialist from AHT Group AG, Elisabeth Kvarnström, a senior consultant with Urban Water Management, Inc., and Ricard Gine, WASH researcher from the Universitat Polècnica de Catalunya.

To participate in the discussion and for more information, please see: forum.susana.org/forum/categories/185-th…on-ladder-next-steps.

Presentations from the 3rd International Conference on Faecal Sludge Management

SuSanA has developed a page which contains presentations from FSM3, the 3rd International Faecal Sludge Management Conference, Hanoi, Vietnam, January 2015.

Also, follow the interesting discussions about the conference on the SuSanA Forum.

FSM3-banner

Below is a partial listing of some of the presentations:

  • Turning the tide on Fecal Sludge Management: Almud Weitz, Principal Regional Team Leader at Water and Sanitation Program East Asia & the Pacific and South Asia – World Bank, Indonesia
  • Market Structuring of Fecal Sludge Management for the Benefit of Poor Households in Dakar: Mbaye Mbeguere, ONAS, Senegal
  • On-site Sanitation Systems and Willingness-to-pay of Emptying in urban areas in Indonesia: Reini Siregar, Water and Sanitation Program World Bank, Jakarta, Indonesia IMG_8067-2
  • Septage Management: An option for improved sanitation in Tripura: Ashutosh Jindal, Urban Development Department, Government of Tripura, India
  • Political economy analysis (PEA) of FSM services: Ian Ross, Oxford Policy Management, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • A Technology Applicability Framework to enable sustainable sanitation technology introduction: Alison Parker, Cranfield Water Science institute, Cranfield University, Bedford, United Kingdom
  • Status of Faecal Sludge Management in Botswana: Review of Policies and Practices: Phillimon T. Odirile, University of Botswana, Mopipi, Botswana

SACOSAN returns to Bangladesh in 2016

7th inter-country working group (ICWG) meeting of SACOSAN, 27 Jan 2015.

7th inter-country working group (ICWG) meeting of SACOSAN, 27 Jan 2015. Photo: Focus Bangla/Financial Express

A Bangladesh government official has disclosed that the 6th South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN-VI) will be held in Dhaka on 11 January 2016. Bangladesh hosted the first edition of SACOSAN in 2003.

Manjur Hossain, a senior secretary of the Local Government Division (LGD) of the Ministry of Local Government, Rural Development and Cooperatives was speaking at the 7th inter-country working group (ICWG) meeting of SACOSAN. The meeting was hosted by LGD from 27-28 January 2015 in Dhaka.

Also at the meeting was Md Akram Al Hossain, coordinator of the SACOSAN-VI secretariat and Joint Secretary, Upazila Branch at LGD.

Related website: SACOSAN-V

Source: 97 percent use hygienic sanitation, Dhaka Tribune, 28 Jan 2015 ; 97pc people brought under sanitation coverage, Financial Express, 28 Jan 2015