Category Archives: Resources

Handy Pod floating toilet innovation by Wetlands Work

Published on May 17, 2016

Wetlands Work! Cambodia’s submission to the Civil Society Innovation Award sponsored by the Australian Aid program, May 2016. The Handy Pod is a floating toilet design suitable to the communities of the Tonle Sap lake area and uses wetlands treatment technology.

 

DFID should ensure sustainability of its WASH programmes – independent review

Richard Gledhill  ICAI

Richard Gledhill

By Richard Gledhill, ICAI lead commissioner for WASH review

62.9 million people – almost the population of the UK – that’s how many people in developing countries DFID claimed to have reached with WASH interventions between 2011 and 2015.

It’s an impressive figure. And – in our first ever ‘impact review’ – it’s a figure the Independent Commission for Aid Impact found to be based on credible evidence.

We assessed the results claim made by DFID about WASH, testing the evidence and visiting projects to see the results for ourselves. We  concluded that the claim was credible – calculated using appropriate methods and conservative assumptions.

But what does reaching 62.9 million people really mean? Have lives been transformed? And have the results been sustainable?

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Top Technologies in Environment & Sustainability 2016 – Research and Markets

Top Technologies in Environment & Sustainability 2016 – Research and Markets | Source: Business Wire, May 19 2016bwlogo_extreme

This research report highlights the top ten environmental technologies that increases the earth’s sustainability and are projected to make the highest impact in the near and medium terms. The technologies have been filtered from a wide spectrum of atmospheric, land-based, water and general environmental technologies using TechVision’s proprietary selection methodology. The assessment criteria cover patenting activity, funding, market potential, Mega Trend impact, regional adoption potential, sectors of economic impact, technology disruptiveness, and the environment and sustainability cluster evolution.

Each section on the top technologies present an overview of market trends and potential, patent landscape, funding, application impact, Mega Trend impact, disruptiveness, regional trends, innovators, and key strategic planning points.

The top ten technologies in environment and sustainability are food waste upcycling, membrane biofilm wastewater treatment, micro irrigation, off-grid desalination, particulate air pollution control, point source carbon dioxide reduction, precision agriculture, waste-to-energy, wastewater membrane filtration and wastewater nutrient recovery

Read the complete article.

Identification and quantification of pathogenic helminth eggs using a digital image system

Identification and quantification of pathogenic helminth eggs using a digital image system. Experimental Parasitology, July 2016.

Authors: B. Jiméneza, C. Maya, et. al.

A system was developed to identify and quantify up to seven species of helminth eggs (Ascaris lumbricoides -fertile and unfertile eggs-, Trichuris trichiura, Toxocara canis, Taenia saginata, Hymenolepis nana, Hymenolepis diminuta, and Schistosoma mansoni) in wastewater using different image processing tools and pattern recognition algorithms.

The system allows the helminth eggs most commonly found in wastewater to be reliably and uniformly detected and quantified. In addition, it provides the total number of eggs as well as the individual number by species, and for Ascaris lumbricoides it differentiates whether or not the egg is fertile.

The system only requires basically trained technicians to prepare the samples, as for visual identification there is no need for highly trained personnel. The time required to analyze each image is less than a minute. This system could be used in central analytical laboratories providing a remote analysis service.

 

Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries

Linkedin Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries – 5,745 members

Welcome to the Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene. The aim of the CoP is to reinforce the global community of those working in sanitation and hygiene and create a neutral platform to share and learn together.

The group is managed by a coordinator who currently sits within the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC). The coordinator works with a global team of ‘stewards’ who are dedicated and well respected sector professionals. The Stewards are responsible for the strategic decisions for the CoP and each one brings different opportunities, networks and geographical representation to the table.

The Center for Global Safe Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene/Emory University Spring 2016 Newsletter

The Center for Global Safe Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene/Emory University Spring 2016 Newsletter

The Center for Global Safe Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene is an applied research consortium consisting of the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, the Carter Center, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Georgia Tech, and CARE, located in Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health.

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Two-year old Oscar playing in bath water in Dominican Republic. Photo by Emily Brennan.

The  mission of the CGSW is to enable organizations and communities to provide safe, effective, and sustainable drinking water and effective and sustainable sanitation and hygiene improvements by:

  • Contributing to the evidence base of scientific and practical information
  • Identifying and promoting innovative approaches and partnerships that address the world’s water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) challenge
  • Evaluating interventions and disseminating lessons learned
  • Training future generations of water, sanitation, and global health experts and building capacity of developing country institutions

The Center for Global Safe WASH Newsletter will be sent out quarterly and will serve to share the research and work that the CGSW is doing to influence policies and programs.

This issue contains updates on SaniPath, new research studies, information on upcoming workshops and more.

Chicken coops, sewage treatment plants are hot spots of antibiotic resistance

Chicken coops, sewage treatment plants are hot spots of antibiotic resistance | Source: Eureka Alerts,  May 11 2016 |

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria most often are associated with hospitals and other health-care settings, but a new study indicates that chicken coops and sewage treatment plants also are hot spots of antibiotic resistance.

The research, led by a team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is published May 12 in Nature.

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Antibiotic-resistant bacteria most often are associated with hospitals and other health-care settings, but a new study indicates that chicken coops and sewage treatment plants also are hot spots of antibiotic resistance. The new study surveyed ecosystems of bacteria and their capacity to resist antibiotics in low-resource communities, including Pampas de San Juan de Miraflores, a densely populated slum outside Lima, Peru. The research, led by a team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is published May 12 in Nature. CREDIT: Pablo Tsukayama

The scientists surveyed bacteria and their capacity to resist antibiotics in a rural village in El Salvador and a densely populated slum on the outskirts of Lima, Peru. In both communities, the researchers identified areas ripe for bacteria to shuffle and share their resistance genes. These hot spots of potential resistance transmission included chicken coops in the rural village and a modern wastewater treatment plant outside Lima.

“Bacteria can do this weird thing that we can’t — exchange DNA directly between unrelated organisms,” said senior author Gautam Dantas, PhD, an associate professor of pathology and immunology. “That means it’s relatively easy for disease-causing bacteria that are treatable with antibiotics to become resistant to those antibiotics quickly. If these bacteria happen to come into contact with other microbes that carry resistance genes, those genes can pop over in one step. We estimate that such gene-transfer events are generally rare, but they are more likely to occur in these hot spots we identified.”

Read the complete article.