Category Archives: Campaigns and Events

The Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) at the World Water Week 2016 in Stockholm

The World Water Week 2016 in Stockholm is lying ahead and the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) will be Co-Convener of several exciting events related to WASH and Sustainable Sanitation. Moreover, the 22nd SuSanA Meeting (27th of August) as well as several SuSanA Working Group Meetings will take place during the SWWW. Make sure to take a look at the official SWWW SuSanA Flyer (link below) to find out more about the event topics and their schedule.

Apart from the events themselves the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance will be hosting an official SuSanA Booth (Booth No. 44) where you can have interesting conversations on the topic or simply read through some of the latest SuSanA publications.

For all people that are interested but not able to join the SWWW there will be a Live Stream of the SuSanA events as well as live Twitter updates using the hashtag #22susana

If you want to register for the SuSanA events at the SWWW you can find the registration link as well as more information here: http://www.susana.org/en/events/susana-meetings/2016/505-22nd-susana-meeting-stockholm

Lastly, if you have any questions or comments you can post them on the SuSanA Forum (after registration): http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/232-susana-meetings/18372-22nd-susana-meeting-27-august-2016-and-susana-events-at-world-water-week-in-stockholm

SuSanA_Events_SWWW2016_Flyer

 

4th International Faecal Sludge Management Conference

4th International Faecal Sludge Management Conference, 19 – 22 February 2017, Chennai, India

Worldwide, 2.7 billion people rely on onsite sanitation. Yet, there is still typically no management system in place to deal with the resulting faecal sludge (e.g. septage and pit latrine sludge). The result is that the waste typically ends up being dumped directly into the urban environment, with significant health and environmental implications. Creating faecal sludge management (FSM) infrastructure and public services that work for everyone, and keep faecal sludge out of the environment is a major challenge for achieving universal sanitation access.

To address this challenge, a global platform for discussion of FSM was created in 2011 by leading global sector organizations. The aim was to share and brainstorm potential solutions, to formulate policy recommendations that promote best practices, and to identify lessons learned in how to make FSM an integral part of sanitation service delivery. Building on the success of the first three International FSM Conferences in Hanoi (2015) and in Durban (2011& 2012), FSM4 aims to bring together professionals working in the sector, including utilities, service providers, cities, governments, academics, scientists, consultants, donors and industries, to support the global initiative of disseminating sustainable solutions for FSM.

FSM4 will be held in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, where the State Government has recently initiated measures to address FSM with regard to policy, regulatory changes, innovative solutions, and pilots. FSM4 will focus on innovative and practical solutions that can be scaled up, including three tracks: research, case studies, and industry & exhibition.

 

Can you spend too much on sanitation?

The decision to divert funding from water to sanitation turned sour when drought struck India.

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Ledger. Uttarakhand, India. Photo: IRC

A budget tracking study in India revealed that the shift of policy focus from water to sanitation has resulted in a cut in government spending on rural water supply. This was a cause of concern because at the time of the study (August-December 2015) six of the seven states reviewed were reeling under severe drought.

A Parliamentary Standing Committee report released on 6 May 2016 stated that the government would be unable to achieve its 2017 target of providing 50% rural households with piped water. The media accused the government of starving the National Rural Drinking Water Programme of funds, while at the same time increasing funding for Prime Minister Modi’s flagship sanitation programme “Swachh Bharat”. The government has even introduced an additional 0.5% “Swachh Bharat” service tax.

The Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability (CBGA) is presenting their budget tracking study on 26 July 2016 in Delhi as part of the WASH Dialogues series of events. WASH Dialogues are an initiative of IRC and TARU Leading Edge. CBGA’s presentation will focus on the institutional and procedural bottlenecks that are constraining public expenditure in the water and sanitation sector.

For more information on the event “Tracking policy and budgetary commitments for drinking water and sanitation in the new fiscal architecture in India” go the IRC Events page.

For more on budget tracking see:

This news item was originally published on the IRC website.

Links to selected 2015 WEDC conference papers on sanitation

Links to selected 2015 WEDC conference papers on sanitation

  1. A mobile based system for monitoring usage of household latrines and hygiene practices in Madhya Pradesh, India * (2015)
  2. Nayak, V.
  3. Acceptability of urban water, sanitation, electricity and transport servicesÊ * (2015)
    Smout, I.
  4. Access to emergency sanitation for Pakistani women: a case study in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan * (2015)
    Ahmed, W.
  5. Accessibility audit for mainstreaming the rights of the persons with disabilities in Bangladesh * (2015)
    Ahmed, S.
  6. Achieving sustainable operation and maintenance of water and sanitation facilities: findings from selected primary schools in northern Uganda * (2015)
    Namata, T.
  7. Alternatives in ecological sanitation: a comparison of systems in Uganda * (2015)
    Kamuteera, E.
  8. An update of themes and trends in urban community-led total sanitation projects * (2015)
    Myers, J.
  9. Attitudes and practises with regard to emptying of onsite systems in Maputo, Mozambique * (2015)
    BŠuerl, M.
  10. Barriers to access water and sanitation services by the urban poor in larger towns of Madhya Pradesh, India: an assessment of citizens’ perception * (2015)
    Kumar, C
  11. Behaviour change determinants: the key to successful WASH strategies * (2015)
    Egreteau, D.

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WASH Futures Conference, May 2016

WASH Futures 2016 – Pathways to universal and sustained water, sanitation and hygiene WASH2016-banner

The future of action on WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) looks positive – with the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals global agenda maintaining attention on the need for water, sanitation and hygiene for everyone, all the time. But the path to achieving this global agenda requires new ways of thinking.

How can all WASH actors – governments, private sectors and civil society – work together to ensure WASH, whether at community-scales or larger institutional-scales, to achieve not only sustained access for everyone, but also health, well-being, environmental and economic outcomes for societies?

In May 2016 practitioners and professionals from civil society, governments, private sectors, donors, students and academic institutions, will come together to contribute to the broader international WASH dialogue and share knowledge with the Australian WASH community and partners.

Go to the conference website.

April 4, 2016 – Handwashing Think Tank

April 4, 2016 – Handwashing Think Tank – Moving from Evidence to Action: Integration, Settings, and Scale handwashingthinktank

The facts about handwashing are clear. It prevents illness–from the commonplace such as influenza, diarrhea, and pneumonia–to the rare, yet deadly–such as Ebola. It’s benefits are far reaching as it impacts not only health, but also nutrition, education, and equity. And, in addition to being effective, it is affordable and accessible.
Yet, despite the clear benefits of hygiene, far too often it isn’t prioritized from the personal level to the policy level.

Join the Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and WaterAid as we learn how the evidence in handwashing integration, settings, and scale can be acted upon.

This event will feature brief, engaging presentations from experts in each of these areas. Attendees will also learn about the latest in handwashing research and have an opportunity to ask questions of the presenters. The event will be concluded with a cocktail reception.

WHEN – Tuesday, April 12, 2016 from 4:00 PM to 7:30 PM (BST)
WHERE – London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine – John Snow Lecture Theatre Main Keppel Street Building, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom

 

USAID Global Waters – March 2016

USAID Global Waters – March 2016

Articles in this issue include:

  • Global Waters Radio: Christian Holmes on Water, Jobs, and Gender Equity
  • Breaking the Taboo: How School WASH Impacts Girls’ Education
  • Making Sanitation Services Affordable in Indonesia’s Cities
  • Celebrating Water Heroes on World Water Day
  • Incubating Innovation: Solutions for a Parched Earth