Category Archives: Campaigns and Events

Webinar faecal sludge, 15 December 2015

VIA Water is organising a webinar on faecal sludge on 15 December 2015 at 14:00 hours CET (UCT +1).

In this webinar you will be able to discuss any issue you might have run into during your work on this topic, and ask VIA Water expert Jan Spit any question you might have. Jan will also kick off by sharing some of his insights. For more information about his background, visit his website.

Check out Jan’s invitation in the short clip below. On the 15th, you will be able to access the webinar through this link: http://bbb.ihe.nl/demo/create.jsp?action=invite&meetingID=VIA+Water+Webinar%27s+meeting

About Via Water

Via Water is a knowledge platform on water and develolpment funded by the Dutch government. It supports projects with innovative solutions for water problems facing cities in seven African countries: Benin, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Mozambique, Rwanda and South Sudan. To learn more go to: www.viawater.nl/about-via-water

Australia helps carry the can on World Toilet Day

Article by Steven Ciobo, Australias Minister for International Development and the Pacific

In Australia, we love toilet humour. The 2006 comedy Kenny, which followed a portable toilet man about his daily business, was a local box office hit, and our televisions are awash with advertisements of puppies unravelling toilet tissue rolls around the house.

4417

United Nations staff installed a 15-door-high inflatable toilet to mark the World Toilet Day in front of the UN headquarters in New York on November 19, 2014. Photograph: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

We can see the funny side of toilets, because we’re able to use a toilet and wash our hands as often as we need. The Australian Department of Social Services publishes an online National Public Toilet Map so we can find, in a matter of seconds, the nearest of some 16,000 public toilets.

Unfortunately, for too many in the world, this is far from the case. According to United Nations estimates around 2.4 billion people, or a third of the world’s population, don’t have access to a basic toilet, leaving them exposed to the many diseases transferred through human waste, such as cholera, typhoid and dysentery. Approximately 946 million people defecate in the open, in fields, streams, forests and open city spaces, which puts entire communities at risk of diarrhoeal diseases.

On 19 November, the world will mark World Toilet Day. This year, the focus is on the link between toilets and nutrition. Regular bouts of diarrhoea caused by open defecation, poor hygiene and unclean water, contribute to poor nutrition, growth stunting and developmental impairment, preventing children from reaching their full potential. In 2014, the World Health Organisation reported 159 million children under five years of age suffer from growth stunting. Nearly 1,000 children die every day from diarrhoeal diseases and poor nutrition, making diarrhoea the world’s second leading disease killer of children . These children are missing valuable time at school and their families are forced to spend their limited incomes on medical care, which exacerbates the cycle of poverty.

Read the full article on the WSSCC Guardian partner zone.

WSSCC increases support to Swachh Bharat Mission

The Water Supply & Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) has announced that it will amplify its support to the Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM), the Government of India’s (GOI) programme to achieve a Clean India by 2019, by establishing an in country India Support Unit and bolstering its work linked to the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF).

The government has welcomed these moves, which enhance WSSCC’s normative and implementation work to improve access and use, equality, knowledge and collaboration in sanitation and hygiene. WSSCC has appointed Mr. Vinod Mishra, previously the organization’s volunteer National Coordinator, to the position of National Officer in a new India Support Unit (ISU). Mr. Mishra will lead a WSSCC team of three professionals, including Ms. Kamini Prakash, an Equality and Non Discrimination Officer, and Ms. Sanchita Ghosh, a Knowledge and Learning Officer, based in Delhi. The unit will coordinate WSSCC support to SBM on policy and monitoring guidelines, capacity building and rapid action learning.

Credit: Anil Teegala

Credit: Anil Teegala

In addition, WSSCC’s work through the Global Sanitation Fund-supported programme managed by NRMC India Private Ltd. will include four additional elements: extension of field operations in the States of Jharkhand, Bihar and Assam; support to the Namami Ganga Mission (NGM) within SBM; support to Bihar State on a “District Approach” to collective behaviour change; and facilitation of peer exchanges with neighbouring States in Northern India. Collectively, these additions respond to the Government’s aims to expand and share through successful sanitation programming.

These additional elements build on an already successful GSF programme which, since 2010, has been instrumental working in those three States with high open defecation rates, to establish the modalities for implementing collective behaviour change at scale, an essential pathway to the practical realization of SBM. To date, WSSCC has facilitated open defecation free status for Gram Panchayats in Jharkhand and Bihar. As of July 2015, the GSF programme has empowered 551,000 people to live in open defecation free villages, and 1.4 million people to gain access to improved sanitation in India. “The Swachh Bharat Mission is a call to action for finally ending the practice of open defecation and ensuring equal access to sanitation and hygiene,” says Dr. Chris W. Williams, Executive Director of WSSCC. “We aim to answer that call and work together to solve the serious and deep rooted sanitation challenges for the well-being, prosperity and very survival of India’s 1.2 billion citizens.”

Since 1990, WSSCC has worked closely through its individual members, National Coordinators and partners to support improved access to sanitation and hygiene. In the past five years alone, the Council held the first Global Forum on Sanitation and Hygiene in Mumbai, facilitated innovative sanitation programming through the GSF, and worked with the Government of India and States to transform sanitation policy and practice to include safe menstrual hygiene management with dignity, responding to the demands of hundreds of millions of women whose monthly periods were hitherto linked to pollution and impurity and therefore shame and indignity.

More recently, along with other partners, WSSCC contributed to the design of the SBM to include equity, innovation, rapid action and learning, and sustainability aspects before it was launched in October 2014. In 2015, GOI called upon WSSCC to organize the first ever national workshop to define the verification of open defecation free (ODF) status in India, followed by the first national sharing of innovations, best practices and failures in sanitation and hygiene. On equity, the Indian example and experience has been leveraged systematically to forge partnerships, innovations and guidelines wider in South Asia and in Africa. Inclusive WASH has also been clearly articulated in regional declarations and hygiene and sanitation proposals for the Sustainable Development Goals. “In a country where pervasive caste and gender inequalities threaten life itself, over 300 million women and girls in India try to squat in a sari, while holding a cup of water to cleanse themselves and keeping an eye out for molesters. Imagine how much more complex and impossible this becomes every month during a woman’s menstrual period!” says Ms. Archana Patkar, Programme Manager, WSSCC. “It is time for the entire development community to unite behind this cause.”

Mr. Mishra added: “The deleterious impacts of poor sanitation and hygiene on health, productivity and well-being extend well beyond India, which is responsible for 60% of the world’s total open defecation, and is nothing short of a global emergency. WSSCC’s amplified engagement will therefore lead to successes and solutions which will not only tackle the emergency here, but help elsewhere.”

Find out more about WSSCCs work in India and in other countries: www.wsscc.org

University of Maryland celebrates Global Handwashing Day 2015

For the fourth year, students from the Global Public Health Scholars program at the University of Maryland, College Park visited the Center for Young Children (CYC), a laboratory school on the UMD campus. pic2

Children at the CYC arrive in the morning and make their way to the child-sized sinks to wash their hands. They bring the skill home, reminding their families to wash hands after they use the bathroom and before dinner.

Global Public Health Scholars visited the Kindergarten class in the Blue Room, sang handwashing songs, led a handwashing educational activity using the “Glo-Germ,” and worked with the children to make a beautiful Global Handwashing Day banner. pic1

The activity raised awareness about the importance of handwashing for disease prevention and alerted children, college students, and parents about many events happening to celebrate Global Handwashing Day around the world.

Thematic Discussion: Private sector engagement in sanitation and hygiene

Join the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries (WSSCC CoP) and the global Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) in a joint 3-week thematic discussion on engaging the local private sector in sanitation and hygiene.  

For more information, please click here to visit the discussion on the SuSanA Forum.

Unbenannt

1. Introduction

Sanitation and hygiene interventions have the objective of ending open defecation and enabling access to safe sanitation by households.  This is reflected in the SDG target 6.2 which aims to “achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all by 2030”.Sanitation marketing is applicable to both rural and urban settings and combines a behaviour change communication component to encourage the adoption of improved and hygienic latrines with a commercial component for developing the right products and services for consumers that are accessible to households at affordable price points.Sanitation marketing therefore requires strong partnerships and coordination of various government departments, development partners, entrepreneurs and financiers with households/consumers at the centre.

Split into three inter-linked and sequenced sub-themes that explore links between research and practice, the discussion focuses on how and under what circumstances local private sector engagement can ensure sustained health and WASH outcomes. Thematic experts will frame and prompt debates each week as follows:

Theme 1: Raising demand for sanitation and hygiene services: will focus on working with the private sector to raise demand through sanitation marketing and financing options including access to household credit, financing for local entrepreneurs or via other means.
We are keen to explore forum members’ insights and experiences on the following:
  1. Considering the SDG target 6.2, how can sanitation marketing approaches be designed most effectively to increase the percentage of populations using safely managed sanitation services in urban and rural settlements?  What are appropriate roles for the local private sector in supporting these efforts?
  2. Experience and formative marketing research has shown that households do not prioritise sanitation financing.  How do we structure micro-credit financing to make it attractive for households to take small loans for sanitation?
  3. In both rural and urban settings, how do we best link CLTS and sanitation marketing in practice and what sequencing of interventions is required?
  4. What approaches to finance can help low-income urban settlements to access safely managed sanitation services?  What are the enablers and barriers to this?

Theme 2: Meeting demand at the household level:will focus on engaging local entrepreneurs to respond to demand through local entrepreneur engagement around toilet construction and emptying.

Theme 3: Engaging private sector further along the chain: will focus on local private sector roles in transport, disposal and reuse

2. Thematic Timeline

  • Theme I: October 26-November 1: Raising demand for sanitation and hygiene services
  • Theme II: November 2-8: Meeting demand at household level
  • Theme III: November 9-15: Engaging private sector further along the chain

For each area, key questions revolve around the business models and financing options that hold promise, the role of government and external agencies in enabling and supporting enterprise development, and the design of appropriate regulation for small and medium enterprises.

3. Experts

  • Dr Amaka Godfrey, WEDC Loughborough University
  • Lillian Mbeki, Consultant
  • Emily Endres, Senior Program Associate, Results for Development Institute
  • Dr. Nicola Greene, Consultant
  • Hung Anh Ta, PhD Candidate, Asian Institute of Technology
  • Magdalena Bäuerl, Project Officer, hydrophil
  • Andreas Knapp, Managing Director, hydrophil
  • Ken Caplan, Director, Partnerships in Practice (Discussion Co-ordinator)

4. Background Readings

Theme I: Raising demand for sanitation and hygiene

Unicef (2010): Sanitation Marketing in Indonisia: http://www.unicef.org/wash/files/6._Sanitation_Marketing_Training_Module.pdf

Water and Sanitation Programme (2014): Scaling up Rural Sanitation: https://www.wsp.org/sites/wsp.org/files/publications/WSP-EAP-Council-Flyer-FY13.pdf

SNF / UNICEF (2013): Rural Kenya Market Research on Sustainable Sanitation Products and Solutions for Low Income Households: http://www.snvworld.org/en/countries/kenya/publications/rural-kenya-market-research-on-sustainable-sanitation-products-and

Australian Wash Working Group: Sanitation Marketing Community of Practice – developing skills to build sanitation markets: http://www.sanitationmarketing.com/

Join the discussion here via SuSanA and via the WSSCC COP !

How can research drive public finance? PF4WASH session at UNC, Thursday 29th Oct 1030!

Hello everyone!

The Public Finance for WASH initiative is organising a session at the UNC Water and Health Conference.
Our aim with this session is to think about different ideas for a research project that might genuinely drive massive government investment in WASH. Each speaker will propose an outline for a specific project, in a named country, which they think might achieve this end. Participants will decide which proposal gets the funding.

Speakers:
• Clarissa Brocklehurst (UNC)
• Jenna Davis (Stanford)
• Matt Freeman (Emory)
• Tanvi Nagpal (Johns Hopkins)

Date: Thursday 29 October
Location: Sunflower
Time: 10:30 – 12:00

If you are around, come along and join our session convened by WSUP, IRC and Trémolet Consulting.
Everyone welcome! Stay tuned!

http://waterinstitute.unc.edu/waterandhealth/

20150825_170054

Sarphati Sanitation Awards 2015 – Get to know the Nominees

Sarphati

Creating innovative solutions to solve the worldwide sanitation problem is what connects the four aspiring nominees for the Sarphati Sanitation Award for Young Entrepreneurs 2015. They are all inspirational examples of how the challenge of providing proper sanitation for everyone can be tackled, simply (Goal #6 of the Sustainable Development Goals) by taking a business approach.

In 2013, World Waternet, Netherlands Water Partnership (NWP) and Aqua for All initiated the biennial Sarphati Sanitation Award (SSA) to honor the outstanding contribution of individuals or organizations to the global sanitation challenge through entrepreneurship.
Continue reading