Category Archives: Campaigns and Events

How can research drive public finance? PF4WASH session at UNC, Thursday 29th Oct 1030!

Hello everyone!

The Public Finance for WASH initiative is organising a session at the UNC Water and Health Conference.
Our aim with this session is to think about different ideas for a research project that might genuinely drive massive government investment in WASH. Each speaker will propose an outline for a specific project, in a named country, which they think might achieve this end. Participants will decide which proposal gets the funding.

Speakers:
• Clarissa Brocklehurst (UNC)
• Jenna Davis (Stanford)
• Matt Freeman (Emory)
• Tanvi Nagpal (Johns Hopkins)

Date: Thursday 29 October
Location: Sunflower
Time: 10:30 – 12:00

If you are around, come along and join our session convened by WSUP, IRC and Trémolet Consulting.
Everyone welcome! Stay tuned!

http://waterinstitute.unc.edu/waterandhealth/

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Sarphati Sanitation Awards 2015 – Get to know the Nominees

Sarphati

Creating innovative solutions to solve the worldwide sanitation problem is what connects the four aspiring nominees for the Sarphati Sanitation Award for Young Entrepreneurs 2015. They are all inspirational examples of how the challenge of providing proper sanitation for everyone can be tackled, simply (Goal #6 of the Sustainable Development Goals) by taking a business approach.

In 2013, World Waternet, Netherlands Water Partnership (NWP) and Aqua for All initiated the biennial Sarphati Sanitation Award (SSA) to honor the outstanding contribution of individuals or organizations to the global sanitation challenge through entrepreneurship.
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Not just another day

Global Handwashing Day is there to remind us of how simple the solutions to serious issues can be.

Global Handwashing Day is on the 15 October. Photograph: Concern Universal

Global Handwashing Day is on the 15 October. Photograph: Concern Universal

I’ve always been a sceptic when it comes to world “Days”. However noble the cause, what difference can they really make? The International Day of Peace – as if the various factions in Syria or Nigeria’s Boko Haram extremists paused from their daily destruction to consider alternative approaches. How many acres of forest are cleared for extracting resources or planting cash-crops every World Environment Day? Aside from providing a hook for advocacy press releases, how could those involved possibly think that one day could positively affect the suffering on the front lines of poverty and insecurity? Well, having run behaviour change projects in West Africa over the last five years I am beginning to believe that it can.

Today is Global Handwashing Day, and together with its cousin World Toilet Day on 19 November, it brings attention to the most basic issues – hygiene and sanitation – that to our shame still account for two million child deaths a year.

A third of the world’s population – 2.4 billion people – live with poor sanitation and hygiene which, according to the World Bank, costs countries $260 billion annually. Every day 2,000 children die before reaching their fifth birthday due to diarrhoeal diseases, the vast majority caused by poor sanitation and hygiene.

Diarrhoea alone killed far more young children in Nigeria over the last 12 months – around 150,000 – than Boko Haram’s slaughtering and the wars in Syria combined. Whilst we continue the daily search for even a hint of a resolution to these two brutal and complex conflicts, we already know the simple solution to tackling hygiene and sanitation-related diseases.

We know that handwashing with soap is the most effective and inexpensive way to prevent diarrhoeal diseases – reducing incidence by up to 47% – and combined with improved sanitation, this is boosted to 68%. We know that in countries with the highest child mortality rates as few as 1% of people wash their hands effectively, and that the global average is only 19%. Most frustratingly, effective tools and participatory methods are readily available and it is estimated that interventions that promote handwashing could save close to a million lives. So why is hygiene promotion not a focus of most development projects?

Read the full article in the WSSCC partner zone on the Guardian.

SuSanA and IRC online thematic discussion: Sustainable urban sanitation – moving forward

We are happy to announce that IRC is holding a 2-week thematic discussion on the topic “Sustainable urban sanitation – moving forward” on the SuSanA online discussion Forum starting from today.

To view the discussion and post, visit:

SuSanA forum: http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/218-thematic-discussion-sustainable-urban-sanitation-moving-forward

The overall theme of this thematic discussion is how to move towards more sustainable urban sanitation. The idea is to initiate a discussion from the perspective of the whole sanitation chain and also the role (or lack of role) which local government has as leaders for change in sanitation. The discussion would focus on case study examples which have worked but also those that have not worked and how these could have been improved given the chance with a focus on the whole sanitation chain. Guiding questions by the thematic experts will help to structure the discussion throughout this e-debate.

Theme 1 (October 13-19): Lack of attention to the whole sanitation chain: Why is there a lack of attention to the whole sanitation chain? Given that sanitation is more than building a toilet and includes changed hygienic behaviours, maintenance, emptying, treatment and disposal or reuse of accumulated faecal matter, why are so many programmes and project still only looking at one possible two sides of this multi-sided chain?

Theme 2 (October 20-23): Lack of leadership for change around sanitation: Sanitation improvements are not the sole responsibility of one entity but is shared between households, private service providers (latrine builders, emptying companies) and/or various line ministries (Min. of Health, Education, Infrastructure, Environment). How can we create a sanitation sector that is more coordinated and aligned with the many players as well providing a supportive and regulatory function? The latter is typically the responsibility of national and local governments. However, in many countries, either there is not a unique institution with the overall responsibility for sanitation, or this designated institution is weak and is not able to lead the sector towards change. Is there a means of creating more substantive governmental leadership in this area for better coordination and harmonisation in the sanitation sector?

The first theme has started today by Cor Dietvorst explainingWhat are we talking about? Systemic change is change that encompasses all parts of a system, taking into account the interrelationships and interdependencies among those parts whereas piecemeal change focuses on one or several parts of a system and thereby addresses only pieces of the urban sanitation problem.”

And asking:

1.What are your views on using the systemic change approach for addressing the (urban) sanitation challenges?

  1. Is it justifiable to continue focusing on onsite containment of human faeces and thereby ignoring all the other links of the sanitation chain? 
  2. How can we balance the need for systemic long-time change with addressing some of the immediate urgent needs?

We warmly invite you to engage with us in the discussion. Experts from the sector will be providing their input and respond to your questions:

  • Erick Baetings (Senior sanitation expert, IRC)
  • Marielle Snel (Senior expert, IRC)
  • Cor Dietvorst (Programme officer, IRC)

BACKGROUND

This discussion is the third in a series of events on urban sanitation co-hosted by IRC. The first in the series was the thematic discussion “Urban Sanitation Finance – From Macro to Micro Level” in June, followed by a Round Table Discussion on Urban Sanitation in line with ULCTS in July and the IRC Event “Working towards sustainable urban sanitation” held in September. Recommended background readings for the discussion are provided here

We look forward to hearing your contributions on this discussion!

WASHplus Weekly: Focus on Global Handwashing Day 2015

Issue 209 | Oct. 9, 2015 | Focus on Global Handwashing Day 2015

Global Handwashing Day occurs each year on October 15. It is a global advocacy day dedicated to increasing awareness and understanding about the importance of handwashing with soap as an effective and affordable way to prevent diseases and save lives. This issue contains links to handwashing resources from WASHplus, the Global-Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing, recent studies, reports, and videos.  Blue-Raise-a-Hand-300x300

RESOURCES

Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing (PPPHW)
This coalition of international stakeholders works explicitly to promote handwashing with soap and recognize hygiene as a pillar of international development and public health. Just a few of the partnership’s resources include the PPPHW website with links to webinars, fact sheets, andmember organizations. Also the Global Handwashing Day Social Media Toolkit features sample messages, blog ideas, and resources to help celebrants and handwashing champions spread the word about Global Handwashing Day.

WASHplus RESOURCES

Small Doable Actions: A Feasible Approach to Behavior Change Learning Brief, 2015. Link
A small doable action is a behavior that, when practiced consistently and correctly, will lead to personal and public health improvement. It is considered feasible by the householder, from HIS/HER point of view, considering the current practice, the available resources, and the particular social context. This brief takes a look at how WASHplus has applied this approach to a range of activities—handwashing, water treatment, improved sanitation, menstrual hygiene management, and food hygiene.

Handwashing and the Science of Habit, 2014. Webinar
This webinar features panelists David Neal, Catalyst Behavioral Sciences; The University of Miami; Jelena Vujcic, Catalyst Behavioral Sciences; The University of Buffalo; Orlando Hernandez, WASHplus, FHI360 and Wendy Wood, The University of Southern California.

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SuSanA and WSSCC online thematic discussion: Sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programming and sustainability

The Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries (WSSCC CoP) and the global Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) are holding a joint 3-week thematic discussion on sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programming and sustainability starting on 22nd September:

Sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programming and sustainability: habit formation, slippage, and the need for long-term programming

The thematic discussion will take place concurrently on both platforms; with a coordinator ensuring that content is shared across both communities. The discussion will be split into three inter-linked sub-themes to further explore how behaviour change can be better understood and improved to ensure health and WASH outcomes are sustained. Thematic experts will frame and prompt debates each week on:

22-28 September – Theme 1: Programming for scale – What are some examples of successful scale-up? How did these models address the issues of inclusion and equity? In the cases of successful scale-up, were programmes initiated and sustained by governmental or non-governmental actors? What is the role of the private sector in implementing sanitation at scale?

28 Sep – 05 Oct – Theme 2: Sustainability for behaviour change – How can behaviour change become systematised and sustained? What are the behavioural determinants and behaviour change techniques we should be aware of? What constitutes an enabling environment for sustainability?

05-12 October – Theme 3: ODF and slippage – How is ODF defined? What are some of the local strategies in place to strengthen sustainability of ODF – within communities and beyond? What are the patterns of slippage? How and when can slippage be monitored in large-scale programmes? Are there more innovative ways looking at not only the physically visible aspects – what about the health impact and the perceptions and views of communities?

Join us for the discussion with some of the following thematic experts:

  • Tracey Keatman, Partnerships in Practice (Coordinator)
  • Suvojit Chattopadhyay, Consultant, focused on Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Mr. Poy Dy, Project Coordinator of Santi Sena (SSO), GSF sub-grantee, Cambodia
  • CLTS Knowledge Hub, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex
  • Clara Rudholm, Senior Programme Officer, Global Sanitation Fund
  • Carolien van der Voorden, Senior Programme Officer, Global Sanitation Fund
  • Matilda Jerneck, Programme Officer, Global Sanitation Fund

Weekly summaries of discussions will be posted on the SuSanA and CoP platforms as well as a synthesis report of overarching findings at the end.

To participate in the discussion, please join here:

SuSanA Forum: http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/209-thematic-discussion-sanitation-and-hygiene-behaviour-change-programming-for-scale-and-sustainability

And

WSSCC CoP: https://www.linkedin.com/grp/home?gid=1238187 

We look forward to some constructive and in-depth discussions!

New Blog! Putting the spotlight on tough financing choices: the Batunga Toilet Challenge role play

by Marie-Alix Prat.
PF4WASH initiative at the World Water Week in Stockholm http://www.publicfinanceforwash.com/Zkd