Category Archives: Campaigns and Events

USAID resources for World Water Day 2016

USAID and Global Waters Support Water and Jobs on World Water Day 2016

World Water Day , held every March 22, is a chance to raise awareness about the importance of water to sustainable development and offers the opportunity to reflect on progress made and challenges ahead. wwd

This year’s UN-designated theme, Water and Jobs , focuses on the power that water and jobs have to transform people’s lives—nearly all jobs are related to water in some way. Water is vital to sustainable development. Access to safe and sufficient water supply, along with improved sanitation and hygiene, can unleash the economic potential of individuals and entire communities.

Through our ongoing water activities, USAID and its partners are lowering the number of people who face water insecurity and suffering from water-related diseases around the globe. Learn more about USAID’s Water and Sanitation Programs.

On World Water Day USAID is launching a new format for its Global Waters online magazine. Features in this issue include:

Join the Conversation:

  • Follow us on Twitter @USAIDenviro
  • Join the global dialogue through #Blue4Water and #WorldWaterDay

VIA Water second faecal sludge webinar report

Which technical options are available for the reuse of faecal sludge? Report of a VIA Water webinar led by Jan Spit.

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© S. Blume/SuSanA Secretariat

Report on the webinar: read the questions that were asked before and during the webinar, and Jan Spit’s answers to them:

  1. D2B: http://english.rvo.nl/subsidies-programmes/develop2build-d2b
  2. DRIVE: http://english.rvo.nl/subsidies-programmes/development-related-infrastructure-investment-vehicle-drive

In Germany: KfW: https://www.kfw.de/International-financing/. For innovative funding, look at: http://www.traidwheel.nl/appropriate-finance/Innovative-financing-mechanisms

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Webinar: Community initiatives for sanitation and health – rescheduled for Thursday January 28th, 11 CET

Note:  This webinar has been re-scheduled to Thursday January 28th, 11 CET. If you already registered on EventBrite, you can remain registered for the event and will receive log-in information for the webinar.

Poor sanitation has serious implications for health including a large burden of diarrheal diseases, which remains the second leading killer of children under 5 globally, and a large burden of intestinal worms. Improving access to sanitation and hygiene and changing behaviours can bring not only health benefits but also many other positive changes in a community, including social, economic and environmental gains.

Deepening our understanding of the linkages between sanitation interventions and health outcomes provides key insight and evidence for decision-makers making investments in sanitation services.

We invite you to join an interactive webinar where experts will discuss how these critical connections at a community level can be improved.
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Innovative Solutions for Access to Sanitation, SKF Conference

Published on Jan 2, 2016
INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS FOR ACCESS TO SANITATION

  • Alison Parker, Nano Membrane Toilet Project Leader, Cranfield University –UK
  • Virginia Gardiner, COO, Loowatt – UK
  • Asantewa Gyamfi, Research Manager, Clean Team – Ghana
  • Benedict Tuffuor, Program Officer, TREND – Ghana

SKF 10, ICTP, Trieste – November 6th 2015 – Session 2 – RESPONDING TO FUNDAMENTAL HUMAN NEEDS

Webinar faecal sludge, 15 December 2015

VIA Water is organising a webinar on faecal sludge on 15 December 2015 at 14:00 hours CET (UCT +1).

In this webinar you will be able to discuss any issue you might have run into during your work on this topic, and ask VIA Water expert Jan Spit any question you might have. Jan will also kick off by sharing some of his insights. For more information about his background, visit his website.

Check out Jan’s invitation in the short clip below. On the 15th, you will be able to access the webinar through this link: http://bbb.ihe.nl/demo/create.jsp?action=invite&meetingID=VIA+Water+Webinar%27s+meeting

About Via Water

Via Water is a knowledge platform on water and develolpment funded by the Dutch government. It supports projects with innovative solutions for water problems facing cities in seven African countries: Benin, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Mozambique, Rwanda and South Sudan. To learn more go to: www.viawater.nl/about-via-water

Australia helps carry the can on World Toilet Day

Article by Steven Ciobo, Australias Minister for International Development and the Pacific

In Australia, we love toilet humour. The 2006 comedy Kenny, which followed a portable toilet man about his daily business, was a local box office hit, and our televisions are awash with advertisements of puppies unravelling toilet tissue rolls around the house.

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United Nations staff installed a 15-door-high inflatable toilet to mark the World Toilet Day in front of the UN headquarters in New York on November 19, 2014. Photograph: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

We can see the funny side of toilets, because we’re able to use a toilet and wash our hands as often as we need. The Australian Department of Social Services publishes an online National Public Toilet Map so we can find, in a matter of seconds, the nearest of some 16,000 public toilets.

Unfortunately, for too many in the world, this is far from the case. According to United Nations estimates around 2.4 billion people, or a third of the world’s population, don’t have access to a basic toilet, leaving them exposed to the many diseases transferred through human waste, such as cholera, typhoid and dysentery. Approximately 946 million people defecate in the open, in fields, streams, forests and open city spaces, which puts entire communities at risk of diarrhoeal diseases.

On 19 November, the world will mark World Toilet Day. This year, the focus is on the link between toilets and nutrition. Regular bouts of diarrhoea caused by open defecation, poor hygiene and unclean water, contribute to poor nutrition, growth stunting and developmental impairment, preventing children from reaching their full potential. In 2014, the World Health Organisation reported 159 million children under five years of age suffer from growth stunting. Nearly 1,000 children die every day from diarrhoeal diseases and poor nutrition, making diarrhoea the world’s second leading disease killer of children . These children are missing valuable time at school and their families are forced to spend their limited incomes on medical care, which exacerbates the cycle of poverty.

Read the full article on the WSSCC Guardian partner zone.

WSSCC increases support to Swachh Bharat Mission

The Water Supply & Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) has announced that it will amplify its support to the Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM), the Government of India’s (GOI) programme to achieve a Clean India by 2019, by establishing an in country India Support Unit and bolstering its work linked to the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF).

The government has welcomed these moves, which enhance WSSCC’s normative and implementation work to improve access and use, equality, knowledge and collaboration in sanitation and hygiene. WSSCC has appointed Mr. Vinod Mishra, previously the organization’s volunteer National Coordinator, to the position of National Officer in a new India Support Unit (ISU). Mr. Mishra will lead a WSSCC team of three professionals, including Ms. Kamini Prakash, an Equality and Non Discrimination Officer, and Ms. Sanchita Ghosh, a Knowledge and Learning Officer, based in Delhi. The unit will coordinate WSSCC support to SBM on policy and monitoring guidelines, capacity building and rapid action learning.

Credit: Anil Teegala

Credit: Anil Teegala

In addition, WSSCC’s work through the Global Sanitation Fund-supported programme managed by NRMC India Private Ltd. will include four additional elements: extension of field operations in the States of Jharkhand, Bihar and Assam; support to the Namami Ganga Mission (NGM) within SBM; support to Bihar State on a “District Approach” to collective behaviour change; and facilitation of peer exchanges with neighbouring States in Northern India. Collectively, these additions respond to the Government’s aims to expand and share through successful sanitation programming.

These additional elements build on an already successful GSF programme which, since 2010, has been instrumental working in those three States with high open defecation rates, to establish the modalities for implementing collective behaviour change at scale, an essential pathway to the practical realization of SBM. To date, WSSCC has facilitated open defecation free status for Gram Panchayats in Jharkhand and Bihar. As of July 2015, the GSF programme has empowered 551,000 people to live in open defecation free villages, and 1.4 million people to gain access to improved sanitation in India. “The Swachh Bharat Mission is a call to action for finally ending the practice of open defecation and ensuring equal access to sanitation and hygiene,” says Dr. Chris W. Williams, Executive Director of WSSCC. “We aim to answer that call and work together to solve the serious and deep rooted sanitation challenges for the well-being, prosperity and very survival of India’s 1.2 billion citizens.”

Since 1990, WSSCC has worked closely through its individual members, National Coordinators and partners to support improved access to sanitation and hygiene. In the past five years alone, the Council held the first Global Forum on Sanitation and Hygiene in Mumbai, facilitated innovative sanitation programming through the GSF, and worked with the Government of India and States to transform sanitation policy and practice to include safe menstrual hygiene management with dignity, responding to the demands of hundreds of millions of women whose monthly periods were hitherto linked to pollution and impurity and therefore shame and indignity.

More recently, along with other partners, WSSCC contributed to the design of the SBM to include equity, innovation, rapid action and learning, and sustainability aspects before it was launched in October 2014. In 2015, GOI called upon WSSCC to organize the first ever national workshop to define the verification of open defecation free (ODF) status in India, followed by the first national sharing of innovations, best practices and failures in sanitation and hygiene. On equity, the Indian example and experience has been leveraged systematically to forge partnerships, innovations and guidelines wider in South Asia and in Africa. Inclusive WASH has also been clearly articulated in regional declarations and hygiene and sanitation proposals for the Sustainable Development Goals. “In a country where pervasive caste and gender inequalities threaten life itself, over 300 million women and girls in India try to squat in a sari, while holding a cup of water to cleanse themselves and keeping an eye out for molesters. Imagine how much more complex and impossible this becomes every month during a woman’s menstrual period!” says Ms. Archana Patkar, Programme Manager, WSSCC. “It is time for the entire development community to unite behind this cause.”

Mr. Mishra added: “The deleterious impacts of poor sanitation and hygiene on health, productivity and well-being extend well beyond India, which is responsible for 60% of the world’s total open defecation, and is nothing short of a global emergency. WSSCC’s amplified engagement will therefore lead to successes and solutions which will not only tackle the emergency here, but help elsewhere.”

Find out more about WSSCCs work in India and in other countries: www.wsscc.org