Category Archives: Research

Recent WASH research – October 17, 2017

Gender Publications

New WHO Publications

Others

Blog Posts

Recent WASH research – October 5, 2017

RECENT ADDITIONS TO THE USAID DEVELOPMENT EXPERIENCE CLEARINGHOUSE

OTHER RECENT USAID-RELATED PUBLICATIONS

JOURNAL ARTICLES

REPORTS

BLOGS

ABSTRACT/ORDER

Selected papers from the 2017 WEDC conference

There were 146 papers accepted for the July 2017 WEDC conference and the link to these is: http://wedc.lu/wedc40-papers.

Papers accepted for WEDC conferences go through a rigorous review process and are useful for learning about recent WASH innovations and lessons learned.

Below are links to selected papers on Behavior Change, Financing, Emergency WASH, Menstrual Hygiene Management, Sanitation, WASH & Nutrition and Sustainability.

BEHAVIOR CHANGE

FINANCING

EMERGENCY WASH

MENSTRUAL HYGIENE MANAGEMENT

SANITATION

WASH/NUTRITION

SUSTAINABILITY

New Reports from SHARE on hygiene, WASH/nutrition and handwashing

Recipe for Success: how policymakers can integrate WASH into actions to end malnutrition – In this report, Action Against Hunger, WaterAid and SHARE assert that the integration of action on nutrition and WASH is fundamental to the recipe for success. share

‘Unfit for human consumption’: a study of the contamination of formula milk fed to young children in East Java, Indonesia – A new paper, led by Sarah Gibson (LSHTM MSc student) highlights that 88% of bottle feeds tested in Indonesia were contaminated. The high levels of contamination found that bottles are an important faecal-oral exposure pathway resulting from poor hygiene practices during bottle preparation.

Mikono Safi formative research findings in Tanzania – MITU has produced a brief highlighting the key formative research findings for a behavior change intervention that promotes handwashing with soap. The formative work was trialed in three schools in the Kagera region, and provides useful insights that will inform the development of the main trial.

 

Recent WASH research – September 25, 2017

USAID

OPEN ACCESS

ABSTRACT/ORDER

IN THE NEWS

Journal of Water, Sanitation & Hygiene for Development, September 2017

Below are links to open access articles in the September 2017; Vol. 7, No. 3 issue.

Editorial – Limited services? The role of shared sanitation in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
Authors: Barbara Evans, Andrés Hueso, Richard Johnston, Guy Norman, Eddy Pérez, Tom Slaymaker and Sophie Trémolet

The role of packaged water in meeting global targets on improved water access
Authors: Sridhar Vedachalam, Luke H. MacDonald, Elizabeth Omoluabi, Funmilola OlaOlorun, Easmon Otupiri and Kellogg J. Schwab

Investigation on microbial inactivation and urea decomposition in human urine during thermal storage
Authors: Xiaoqin Zhou, Yajie Li, Zifu Li, Yue Xi, Sayed Mohammad Nazim Uddin and Yang Zhang

Cultural preferences for the methods and motivation of sanitation infrastructure development
Authors: Miriam E. Hacker and Jessica A. Kaminsky

Sanitation value chains in low density settings in Indonesia and Vietnam: impetus for a rethink to achieve pro-poor outcomes
Authors: Juliet Willetts, Anna Gero, Akhmad Akbar Susamto, Ryan Sanjaya, Thanh Doan Trieu, Janina Murta and Naomi Carrard

 

The impact of sanitation on infectious disease and nutritional status: A systematic review and meta-analysis

The impact of sanitation on infectious disease and nutritional status: A systematic review and meta-analysis. International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health
Volume 220, Issue 6, August 2017, Pages 928-949.

Authors: Matthew Freeman, Joshua Garn, Gloria Sclar, et al.

Background – Sanitation aims to sequester human feces and prevent exposure to fecal pathogens. More than 2.4 billion people worldwide lack access to improved sanitation facilities and almost one billion practice open defecation. We undertook systematic reviews and meta-analyses to compile the most recent evidence on the impact of sanitation on diarrhea, soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections, trachoma, schistosomiasis, and nutritional status assessed using anthropometry.

Methods and findings – We updated previously published reviews by following their search strategy and eligibility criteria. We searched from the previous review’s end date to December 31, 2015. We conducted meta-analyses to estimate pooled measures of effect using random-effects models and conducted subgroup analyses to assess impact of different levels of sanitation services and to explore sources of heterogeneity. We assessed risk of bias and quality of the evidence from intervention studies using the Liverpool Quality Appraisal Tool (LQAT) and Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach, respectively. A total of 171 studies met the review’s inclusion criteria, including 64 studies not included in the previous reviews. Overall, the evidence suggests that sanitation is protective against diarrhea, active trachoma, some STH infections, schistosomiasis, and height-for-age, with no protective effect for other anthropometric outcomes. The evidence was generally of poor quality, heterogeneity was high, and GRADE scores ranged from very low to high.

Conclusions – This review confirms positive impacts of sanitation on aspects of health. Evidence gaps remain and point to the need for research that rigorously describes sanitation implementation and type of sanitation interventions.