Category Archives: Uncategorized

World Hepatitis Day, 28 July 2016

World Hepatitis Day, 28 July 2016

WHO encourages countries to act now to reduce deaths from viral hepatitis

WHO urges countries to take rapid action to improve knowledge about hepatitis, and to increase access to testing and treatment services. Today, only 1 in 20 people with hepatitis know they have it. And just 1 in 100 with the disease is being treated. JESS3_WHO_WHD16_Final_English-v1

“The world has ignored hepatitis at its peril,” said Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General. “It is time to mobilize a global response to hepatitis on the scale similar to that generated to fight other like HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis.”

Can you spend too much on sanitation?

The decision to divert funding from water to sanitation turned sour when drought struck India.

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Ledger. Uttarakhand, India. Photo: IRC

A budget tracking study in India revealed that the shift of policy focus from water to sanitation has resulted in a cut in government spending on rural water supply. This was a cause of concern because at the time of the study (August-December 2015) six of the seven states reviewed were reeling under severe drought.

A Parliamentary Standing Committee report released on 6 May 2016 stated that the government would be unable to achieve its 2017 target of providing 50% rural households with piped water. The media accused the government of starving the National Rural Drinking Water Programme of funds, while at the same time increasing funding for Prime Minister Modi’s flagship sanitation programme “Swachh Bharat”. The government has even introduced an additional 0.5% “Swachh Bharat” service tax.

The Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability (CBGA) is presenting their budget tracking study on 26 July 2016 in Delhi as part of the WASH Dialogues series of events. WASH Dialogues are an initiative of IRC and TARU Leading Edge. CBGA’s presentation will focus on the institutional and procedural bottlenecks that are constraining public expenditure in the water and sanitation sector.

For more information on the event “Tracking policy and budgetary commitments for drinking water and sanitation in the new fiscal architecture in India” go the IRC Events page.

For more on budget tracking see:

This news item was originally published on the IRC website.

Sustainable Sanitation for All: Experiences, challenges, and innovations

Sustainable Sanitation for All: Experiences, challenges, and innovations, June 2016. Practical Action.

Great strides have been made in improving sanitation in many developing countries. Yet, 2.4 billion people worldwide still lack access to adequate sanitation facilities and the poorest and most vulnerable members of society are often not reached and their specific needs are not met. sanitation

Moreover, sustainability is currently one of the key challenges in CLTS and wider WASH practice, subsuming issues such as behaviour change, equity and inclusion, physical sustainability and sanitation marketing, monitoring and verification, engagement of governments, NGOs and donors, particularly after open defecation free (ODF) status is reached, and more.

Achievement of ODF status is now recognised as only the first stage in a long process of change and sanitation improvement, with new challenges emerging every step of the way, such as how to stimulate progress up the sanitation ladder, how to ensure the poorest and marginalised are reached, or how to maintain and embed behaviour change.

There have been several useful studies on sustainability that have highlighted some of these different aspects as well as the complexities involved. This book develops these key themes by exploring current experience, practices, challenges, innovations and insights, as well as identifying a future research agenda and gaps in current knowledge.

Describing the landscape of sustainability of CLTS and sanitation with reference to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and through examples from Africa and Asia, the book captures a range of experiences and innovations from a broad range of institutions and actors within the WASH sector, and attempts to make recommendations and practical suggestions for policy and practice for practitioners, funders, policy-makers and governments.

Nudging and Habit Change for Open Defecation: New Tactics from Behavioral Science

Nudging and Habit Change for Open Defecation: New Tactics from Behavioral Science, March 2016. 

Authors: David Neal, Ph.D. (Catalyst), Jelena Vujcic, M.P.H. (Catalyst), Rachel Burns Ph.D. (Catalyst), Wendy Wood, Ph.D. (University of Southern California) and Jacqueline Devine, MBA (World Bank, Water and Sanitation Program)

In this working paper, we draw on basic scientifc fndings from psychology, cognitive science, and behavioral economics to propose a framework of 8 System 1 Principles to support the initiation and maintenance of OD behavior change.

In doing so, we build from the general framework advanced in the World Bank Group’s (2015) World Development Report: Mind, Society, and Behavior, which emphasized three core insights from behavioral science, namely that people think (a) automatically, (b) socially and (c) using mental models that channel their decision-making.

 

22nd Meeting of the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA)

The 22nd SuSanA meeting, hosted by the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), will take place on 27 August 2016 prior to the World Water Week (WWW)in Stockholm, Sweden.

Furthermore, several SuSanA working group Meetings and a SFD meeting are scheduled during the week:

  • SFD-it’s use and potential in the sanitation sector (working title) – Friday, August 26 (14:00-18:00h)
  • WG 1 (Capacity Development) – Linked to the session “Attracting, engaging and developing the capacity of water professionals” August 30, 14:00-15:30h (Room 352)
  • WG 2 (Market Development) – August 28, 14:00-15:30h
  • WG 7 (WASH in Schools) – August 30, 9:00 to 10:30h (Room 352)
  • WG 8 (Emergency and Reconstruction situation) – Linked to the session “Opportunities & Limitations of Market-based Programming to Address Humanitarian WASH Needs” August 30, 11:00-12:30h (Room 352)
  • WG 12 (WASH & Nutrition) – Linked to the session “Upscaling the WASH-Nutrition Nexus for Sustainable (Body) Growth” – August 30, 14:00-15:30h (Room 362)

The registration for the SuSanA meeting is free of charge, but you must cover your own travel expenses and accommodation. Please note that SuSanA secretariat does not provide financial support to attend this event.

Your registration will assist us in the preparation of the meeting, so we request all attendees to register for this reason. Please feel free to contact the SuSanA secretariat at info@susana.org for any queries.

Please register here:www.susana.org/en/registration-22nd-susana-meeting

More Information about the SuSanA Events in Stockholm are available here: www.susana.org/en/events/susana-meetings…na-meeting-stockholm

We are looking forward to seeing many of you in Stockholm!

Intra-Household Access to WASH in Uganda and Zambia – Do Variations Exist?

Intra-Household Access to WASH in Uganda and Zambia – Do Variations Exist? SHARE.

This paper was produced for the 39th WEDC Conference held in Ghana in July 2016. It analyses baseline data from the SHARE-funded Undoing Inequity project to explore whether differences exist between heads of household and ‘vulnerable’ individuals’ reports on access and use of WASH at the household level.

PMA2020 WASH Brief on Indonesia

Performance Monitoring and Accountability (PMA2020) uses innovative mobile technology to support low-cost, rapid-turnaround surveys to monitor key indicators for family planning and WASH. indonesia-pma-4

The project is implemented by local university and research organizations in 10 countries, deploying a cadre of female resident enumerators trained in mobile-assisted data collection at 6-month and 12-month intervals.

PMA2020 WASH briefs provide a two-page snapshot of key WASH indicators including number of household water sources, use of unimproved water sources and sanitation facilities, as well as percent of population using open defecation as a main or regular practice.

Our latest WASH brief from Indonesia is based off of a nationally representative survey conducted between June and August 2015.

For more information on PMA2020 WASH please visit http://www.pma2020.org, or contact Alec Shannon at ashannon@jhu.edu.