Category Archives: Uncategorized

FINANCE BRIEF: South Africa’s Equitable Share Formula: a useful model for WASH financing?

South Africa’s Equitable Share Formula is a mechanism for transfer of funds from central to local government, to support basic services including water and sanitation. This Finance Brief outlines how the system works, and reports on its use for water and sanitation. There are a number of problems with implementation of the Equitable Share in South Africa; however, we consider that the mechanism per se is good, and can be a useful model for other countries.

http://www.publicfinanceforwash.com/resources/finance-brief-5-south-africas-equitable-share-formula-useful-model-wash-financing

Recordings from webinar with BMGF grantees: “What constitutes success for CLTS? – Measuring community outcomes and behavior change”

In July a webinar took place with the title “What constitutes success for CLTS? – Measuring community outcomes and behavior change”. The recordings of this webinar are now available as sound files (podcasts) and as videos. In the webinar, experts working with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s “Building Demand for Sanitation” Programme shared their insights on this topic.

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SuSanA thematic discussion: Sustainable Development Goals – enough to end the sanitation crisis?

SDG

The Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA), in partnership with End Water Poverty, is holding a 2 week thematic discussion on exploring whether the new SDG indicators on sanitation will address the gaps left by the MDGs and what the SDGs can do differently to ensure those most in need have their human right to water and sanitation realised.
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WHO strengthens focus on water, sanitation and hygiene to accelerate elimination of neglected tropical diseases

August 27, 2015 –  WHO strengthens focus on water, sanitation and hygiene to accelerate elimination of neglected tropical diseases | Source: World Health Organization

27 August 2015 –– The World Health Organization (WHO) today unveiled a global plan to better integrate water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services with four other public health interventions to accelerate progress in eliminating and eradicating neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) by 2020.

International Trachoma Initiative (ITI)

International Trachoma Initiative (ITI)

“Millions suffer from devastating WASH-related neglected tropical diseases – such as soil-transmitted helminthiasis, guinea-worm disease, trachoma and schistosomiasis – all of which affect mainly children” said Dr Maria Neira, WHO Director for Public Health, Environmental and Social Determinants of Health. “Solutions exist, such as access to safe water, managing human excreta, improving hygiene, and enhancing targeted environmental management. Such improvements not only lead to improved health, but also reduce poverty.”

Related links

Targeted water and sanitation interventions are expected to bolster ongoing efforts in tackling 16 out of the 17 NTDs, which affect more than 1 billion of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable populations.

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WASHplus Weekly: Focus on WASH & Innovation

Issue 204 | August 28, 2015 | Focus on WASH & Innovation

This issue features some of the many innovative water supply, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) programs, products, and services that are currently underway. Please contact WASHplus if you have other innovative resources that we can include in a future issue on innovation. Included are resources from WASHplus, the Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing, USAID, DFID, and others. Also included are recent videos on sanitation in floating communities, information on Shit Flow Diagrams, the SlingShot water purification system, sanitation innovation through design, and innovative financing methods.

WASHPLUS | GLOBAL PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP FOR HANDWASHING | USAID RESOURCES

Breaking the Cycle: Small Doable Actions in WASH to Improve Child Health. J Rosenbaum, WASHplus; FHI 360. Video
WASHplus’s Julia Rosenbaum discusses the power of small doable actions in WASH programs. This approach to behavior change encourages households to adopt feasible actions and enabling technologies to move them toward ideal hygiene and sanitation practices.

Handwashing and the Science of Habit Webinar, 2015. Webinar
USAID/WASHplus and the PPPHW co-hosted a webinar with David Neal, Ph.D., from Catalyst Behavior Sciences and the University of Miami. In this webinar, Dr. Neal emphasized ways to apply the basic science of habit and behavior change to real world health interventions and program delivery, with a focus on behavior change for handwashing with soap.

USAID Development Innovation Ventures (DIV). Website | Ensuring Access to Safe Water
DIV is an open competition supporting breakthrough solutions to the world’s most intractable development challenges—interventions that could change millions of lives at a fraction of the usual cost. The Ensuring Access to Safe Water section of the DIV website has summaries of three projects: Bringing Safe Water to Scale, Monitoring Clean Drinking Water through Technology and Open Data, and Making Water Filtration Affordable for Kenyan Households.

WORLD WATER WEEK 2015 RESOURCES

Financing for Development: Innovative Financial Mechanisms for the Post-2015 Agenda. World Water Week 2015. Video
This session discusses how to generate an enabling environment and targets questions such as: What innovative financing mechanisms must be developed to achieve the water-related Sustainable Development Goals? What are the existing strategies already addressing this issue? What can we learn from other sectors and regions?

Vote for Your Favorite Water Idea, 2015. Link
As part of World Water Week 2015, people can vote for one of ten innovative ways to conserve and manage water resources.

DFID RESOURCES

Can Innovation Prizes Help Address Water and Sanitation Challenges? 2015. S Trémolet. Link
This paper helps identify how innovation prizes can be used to address intractable issues in the WASH sector. It also presents a number of areas where innovation prizes could be used to either trigger genuine innovation or promote scaling up of existing innovations in the WASH sector.

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The disgust box: a novel approach to illustrate water contamination with feces

Below are links to 5 Aug 2015 studies on digust, handwashing and maternal mortality, handwashing and NTDs, water quality awareness and breastfeeding and household characteristics and diarrhea.

The disgust box: a novel approach to illustrate water contamination with feces. Health & Science Bulletin, June 2015.

Link: http://goo.gl/3xDeen

Inadequate drinking water, sanitation and hand hygiene are responsible for approximately 800,000 deaths per year in low and middle-income countries. We evaluated the benefits of a behaviour change communication method to motivate water treatment practices in urban low income communities in Dhaka. We used a device called the ‘Disgust Box’ to provide a vivid demonstration of how piped water is contaminated with faeces to motivate people to chlorinate water. Most of the respondents were able to recall the demonstration at both four-month and one year qualitative assessments. At four months, the majority of participants stated that they still felt disgusted by the demonstration and mentioned it as a motivator for water chlorination. However, after one year, despite being able to recall the demonstration, disgust was no longer mentioned as a motivator to chlorinate water. The Disgust Box has the potential to be an effective communication method to motivate water treatment but additional research is necessary to establish a more sustainable approach to reinforce behaviour change.

Using Observational Data to Estimate the Effect of Hand Washing and Clean Delivery Kit Use by Birth Attendants on Maternal Deaths after Home Deliveries in Rural Bangladesh, India and Nepal. PLoS One, Aug 2015. Authors: Nadine Seward, et al.

Link: http://goo.gl/02uiRi

Our evidence suggests that hand washing in delivery is critical for maternal survival among home deliveries in rural South Asia, although the exact magnitude of this effect is uncertain due to inherent biases associated with observational data from low resource settings. Our findings indicating kit use does not improve maternal survival, suggests that the soap is not being used in all instances that kit use is being reported.

Assessment of water, sanitation, and hygiene practices and associated factors in a Buruli ulcer endemic district in Benin (West Africa). BMC Public Health, Aug 2015.

Link: http://goo.gl/CZvJPJ

BU is an important conditions in the district of Lalo with 917 new cases detected from 2006 to 2012. More than 49 % of the household surveyed used unimproved water sources for their daily needs. Only 8.7 % of the investigated household had improved sanitation facilities at home and 9.7 % had improved hygiene behavior. The type of housing as an indicator of the socioeconomic status, the permanent availability of soap and improved hygiene practices were identified as the main factors positively associated with improved sanitation status.

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Overview of sustainable sanitation events at the World Water Week in Stockholm

FlyerThe Secretariat of the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) has compiled a flyer of all SuSanA events and partner of SuSanA events during the World Water Week which is now available for download. This will help you to get an overview of many exciting sessions and events around sustainable sanitation!

For all those, who are not able to go to Stockholm, we will livestream the 20th SuSanA meeting on Saturday 22 August.

Please follow this link for more information and to watch the livestream: http://www.susana.org/en/events/susana-meetings/2015/421-20th-susana-meeting-Stockholm