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Poor sanitation cost global economy US$ 223 billion in 2015

True cost poor sanitation cover

Lack of access to sanitation cost the global economy US$222.9 billion in 2015, up from US$182.5 billion in 2010, a rise of 22% in just five years, according to a new report released on 25 August 2016 by LIXIL Group Corporation (“LIXIL Group”), a global leader in housing and building materials, products and services.

The true cost of poor sanitation, published in collaboration with WaterAid and Oxford Economics, which conducted economic modeling to develop up-to-date estimations of the global cost of poor sanitation, brings to light the high economic burden in low-income and lower-middle income countries.

More than half (55%) of all costs of poor sanitation are a consequence of premature deaths, rising to 75% in Africa. A further quarter are due to treating related diseases, and other costs are related to lower productivity as a result of illnesses and time lost due to lack of access to a private toilet.

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USAID APHIAplus -Community-led sanitation in Nakuru County, Kenya

Published on Aug 3, 2016

APHIAplus Nuru ya Bonde project works with technical teams in five Kenyan counties to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). Over the past five years, the project has helped to significantly increase access to functional latrines in the five counties it covers.

In Nakuru County, Efforts are focused on working with public health officials and communities to stamp out open defecation, practiced by only 3% of the community. This video presents some of the project’s work in the county.

 

Who Delivers without Water? A Multi Country Analysis of Water and Sanitation in the Childbirth Environment

Who Delivers without Water? A Multi Country Analysis of Water and Sanitation in the Childbirth Environment. PLoS One, Aug 2016.

Authors: Giorgia Gon, María Clara Restrepo-Méndez, et. al.

Background and Objectives – Hygiene during childbirth is essential to the health of mothers and newborns, irrespective of where birth takes place. This paper investigates the status of water and sanitation in both the home and facility childbirth environments, and for whom and where this is a more significant problem.

Methods – We used three datasets: a global dataset, with information on the home environment from 58 countries, and two datasets for each of four countries in Eastern Africa: a healthcare facility dataset, and a dataset that incorporated information on facilities and the home environment to create a comprehensive description of birth environments in those countries. We constructed indices of improved water, and improved water and sanitation combined (WATSAN), for the home and healthcare facilities. The Joint Monitoring Program was used to construct indices for household; we tailored them to the facility context–household and facility indices include different components. We described what proportion of women delivered in an environment with improved WATSAN. For those women who delivered at home, we calculated what proportion had improved WATSAN by socio-economic status, education and rural-urban status.

Results – Among women delivering at home (58 countries), coverage of improved WATSAN by region varied from 9% to 53%. Fewer than 15% of women who delivered at home in Sub-Saharan Africa, had access to water and sanitation infrastructure (range 0.1% to 37%). This was worse among the poorest, the less educated and those living in rural areas. In Eastern Africa, where we looked at both the home and facility childbirth environment, a third of women delivered in an environment with improved water in Uganda and Rwanda; whereas, 18% of women in Kenya and 7% in Tanzania delivered with improved water and sanitation. Across the four countries, less than half of the facility deliveries had improved water, or improved water and sanitation in the childbirth environment.

Conclusions – Access to water and sanitation during childbirth is poor across low and middle-income countries. Even when women travel to health facilities for childbirth, they are not guaranteed access to basic WATSAN infrastructure. These indicators should be measured routinely in order to inform improvements.

 

 

The Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) at the World Water Week 2016 in Stockholm

The World Water Week 2016 in Stockholm is lying ahead and the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) will be Co-Convener of several exciting events related to WASH and Sustainable Sanitation. Moreover, the 22nd SuSanA Meeting (27th of August) as well as several SuSanA Working Group Meetings will take place during the SWWW. Make sure to take a look at the official SWWW SuSanA Flyer (link below) to find out more about the event topics and their schedule.

Apart from the events themselves the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance will be hosting an official SuSanA Booth (Booth No. 44) where you can have interesting conversations on the topic or simply read through some of the latest SuSanA publications.

For all people that are interested but not able to join the SWWW there will be a Live Stream of the SuSanA events as well as live Twitter updates using the hashtag #22susana

If you want to register for the SuSanA events at the SWWW you can find the registration link as well as more information here: http://www.susana.org/en/events/susana-meetings/2016/505-22nd-susana-meeting-stockholm

Lastly, if you have any questions or comments you can post them on the SuSanA Forum (after registration): http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/232-susana-meetings/18372-22nd-susana-meeting-27-august-2016-and-susana-events-at-world-water-week-in-stockholm

SuSanA_Events_SWWW2016_Flyer

 

Transforming Haiti With An Endless Local Resource

Transforming Haiti With An Endless Local Resource | National Geographic, Aug 18 2016 |

Everyone poops. But not many people really think about what happens to it. We flush the toilet and it is out of sight and out of mind. Sasha Kramer, on the other hand, has poop on her mind all the time.

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Sasha Kramer visits the community of Shada, where SOIL has provided ecological sanitation for ten years. Photograph by James M. Felter

She is a sanitation revolutionary helping to transform human waste into fertile organic compost for agriculture and reforestation in Haiti. “Arguably,” Kramer says, “the most important thing in nature is soil, that’s where all life comes from.”

Kramer is an ecologist, human rights advocate, National Geographic emerging explorer, and the executive director of Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods (SOIL). SOIL primarily focuses on promoting the use of ecological sanitation, a process that uses naturally occurring microbes and heat to convert human waste to rich compost.

Ecological sanitation at SOIL means dry composting toilets, which can be simple and low cost so that it works even in crowded, informal settlement communities where there is little infrastructure.

Read the complete article.

John Oldfield: How to Get Ahead of Zika – and the Next One

How to Get Ahead of Zika – and the Next One | Source: OOSKAnews Voices, Aug 16 2016 |

At a recent forum on global development in Washington DC, the United States Deputy Homeland Security Advisor asserted that the U.S. government cannot merely react or respond to Zika. She is right. The U.S. and the entire global community must find ways to get ahead of its spread, and look for opportunities to prevent, or at least mitigate the severity of, the next such water-related infectious disease.

John Oldfield website pic

John Oldfield, CEO of Water 2017

Increased focus on global water security provides such an opportunity.

In 2012, the United States intelligence community produced an Intelligence Community Assessment on Global Water Security. The report asserts that “during the next 10 years, many countries important to the United States will experience water problems — shortages, poor water quality, or floods — that will risk instability and state failure, increase regional tensions, and distract them from working with the United States on important US policy objectives.”

Water scarcity leads to water hoarding, and families often hoard water in such a way as to facilitate the breeding of mosquitoes. More mosquitoes may lead to a more rapid transmission of Zika, malaria and the next water-related infectious disease. Importantly, as this progression holds true, so does its inverse. Headlines scream that water will cause wars, but the opposite has historically held true. Water brings parties together before conflict erupts. Headlines declare that unsafe water kills millions of people each year. What they don’t say is that safe water (and proper disposal of human waste) keeps billions alive, healthy, and in school or at work.

We can predict the future of water. We know when and where water scarcity will occur with increasingly accurate, granular, and long-term forecasts, even accounting for a changing climate and population growth and movement. Donor and developing country governments along with private sector stakeholders should combine this stronger forecasting ability with deployable assets – people, technology, money – to:

  • identify shared river basins where a lack of institutional capacity is likely to lead to conflict over water resources, then strengthen the capacity of those riparian states and subnational stakeholders to prevent conflict;

Read the complete article.

SuSanA monthly webinar: Understanding the role of learning and donor-implementer relationships, Thursday August 25th 2016, 12:00 BST (London time)

The SuSanA monthly series is back, so please join us for this month’s webinar: ‘Meeting the hidden needs of change-agents in the WASH sector: Understanding the role of learning and donor-implementer relationships’ scheduled for Thursday August 25th 2016 at 12:00 BST (London time), see below for more timezones.

Overview:

This webinar will bring perspectives on two rarely discussed obstacles that innovators face in doing impactful work: the role of learning processes and the role of donor-implementer relationships:Emily Endres, Results for Development Institute: 6 barriers local change-agents face when implementing new ideas or approaches & ideas for overcoming these challenges

Because of the important role civil society organizations play in global development, international development organizations and donors want to support capacity building as well as knowledge sharing and learning within this group. Millions of dollars are invested each year in events and programs designed to disseminate information, share knowledge and build skills, but little is understood about what happens after learners leave the “hotel conference room”. This is called “the Monday morning problem.” After a learner develops or encounters a new approach or skill that they want to integrate into their program or organization, what barriers do they face when they go back to work on Monday morning and try to implement the new idea? Since 2014, Results for Development (R4D) has conducted a series of interviews, focus group discussions, and surveys with WASH program managers based in India and East Africa. This presentation will focus on six major barriers that were identified to implementing new ideas learned from their peers or from other knowledge sharing activities, and discuss a set of recommendations for fellow program implementers, international development partners, and donors or investors to improve the learning and adaptation process.

Susan Davis, Improve International: Is money the root of some evil? Investigating whether donor restrictions affect the sustainability of water and sanitation interventions

In the development world, money makes the world go around. Donors large and small from many countries have funded efforts to address water issues for decades. This is good news. But is all this money leading to good work? Many evaluations of programs have been done, but they haven’t looked rigorously at how things are funded. Improve International decided to examine this issue by seeking the perceptions of people who work for WASH development organizations. In 2015, we distributed an online survey to organizations that receive funds from US-based donors to implement or fund water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions. You might be surprised by some of the differences we found in perceptions. We plan to distribute this survey annually to get more opinions and see whether alignment is changing over time, so we’d like your feedback and input.

Schedule: The webinar will last approximately 1 hour with two 15 minutes presentations followed by an open discussion with webinar participants. We will also open the session 30 minutes beforehand for a low-key ‘mingle’ among participants, where you can use your computer video or microphone.

The webinar is being hosted by Stockholm Environment Institute and the SuSanA secretariat as part of a grant to SEI funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Time:
7:00 New York/Washington DC
12:00 London
13:00 Stockholm
14:00 Nairobi
16:30 New Delhi
18:00 Hanoi
21:00 Sydney

To register please follow this link: http://www.susana.org/webinar-registration

Link for the webinar: seint.adobeconnect.com/seiwebinar/

Log-on password: webinar2016