SuSanA and WSSCC online thematic discussion: Sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programming and sustainability

The Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries (WSSCC CoP) and the global Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) are holding a joint 3-week thematic discussion on sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programming and sustainability starting on 22nd September:

Sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programming and sustainability: habit formation, slippage, and the need for long-term programming

The thematic discussion will take place concurrently on both platforms; with a coordinator ensuring that content is shared across both communities. The discussion will be split into three inter-linked sub-themes to further explore how behaviour change can be better understood and improved to ensure health and WASH outcomes are sustained. Thematic experts will frame and prompt debates each week on:

22-28 September – Theme 1: Programming for scale – What are some examples of successful scale-up? How did these models address the issues of inclusion and equity? In the cases of successful scale-up, were programmes initiated and sustained by governmental or non-governmental actors? What is the role of the private sector in implementing sanitation at scale?

28 Sep – 05 Oct – Theme 2: Sustainability for behaviour change – How can behaviour change become systematised and sustained? What are the behavioural determinants and behaviour change techniques we should be aware of? What constitutes an enabling environment for sustainability?

05-12 October – Theme 3: ODF and slippage – How is ODF defined? What are some of the local strategies in place to strengthen sustainability of ODF – within communities and beyond? What are the patterns of slippage? How and when can slippage be monitored in large-scale programmes? Are there more innovative ways looking at not only the physically visible aspects – what about the health impact and the perceptions and views of communities?

Join us for the discussion with some of the following thematic experts:

  • Tracey Keatman, Partnerships in Practice (Coordinator)
  • Suvojit Chattopadhyay, Consultant, focused on Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Mr. Poy Dy, Project Coordinator of Santi Sena (SSO), GSF sub-grantee, Cambodia
  • CLTS Knowledge Hub, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex
  • Clara Rudholm, Senior Programme Officer, Global Sanitation Fund
  • Carolien van der Voorden, Senior Programme Officer, Global Sanitation Fund
  • Matilda Jerneck, Programme Officer, Global Sanitation Fund

Weekly summaries of discussions will be posted on the SuSanA and CoP platforms as well as a synthesis report of overarching findings at the end.

To participate in the discussion, please join here:

SuSanA Forum:



We look forward to some constructive and in-depth discussions!

Handwashing practices added as new risk factor in latest Global Burden of Disease study

Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks in 188 countries, 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. The Lancet, Sept 11, 2015.

GBD 2013 Risk Factors Collaborators

The Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factor study 2013 (GBD 2013) is the first of a series of annual updates of the GBD. Risk factor quantifi cation, particularly of modifi able risk factors, can help to identify emerging threats to population health and opportunities for prevention. The GBD 2013 provides a timely opportunity to update the comparative risk assessment with new data for exposure, relative risks, and evidence on the appropriate counterfactual risk distribution.

All risks combined account for 57·2% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 55·8–58·5) of deaths and 41·6% (40·1–43·0) of DALYs. Risks quantified account for 87·9% (86·5−89·3) of cardiovascular disease DALYs, ranging to a low of 0% for neonatal disorders and neglected tropical diseases and malaria. In terms of global DALYs in 2013, six risks or clusters of risks each caused more than 5% of DALYs: dietary risks accounting for 11·3 million deaths and 241·4 million DALYs, high systolic blood pressure for 10·4 million deaths and 208·1 million DALYs, child and maternal malnutrition for 1·7 million deaths and 176·9 million DALYs, tobacco smoke for 6·1 million deaths and 143·5 million DALYs, air pollution for 5·5 million deaths and 141·5 million DALYs, and high BMI for 4·4 million deaths and 134·0 million DALYs.

Risk factor patterns vary across regions and countries and with time. In sub-Saharan Africa, the leading risk factors are child and maternal malnutrition, unsafe sex, and unsafe water, sanitation, and handwashing.

Behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks can explain half of global mortality and more than one-third of global DALYs providing many opportunities for prevention. Of the larger risks, the attributable burden of high BMI has increased in the past 23 years. In view of the prominence of behavioural risk factors, behavioural and social science research on interventions for these risks should be strengthened. Many prevention and primary care policy options are available now to act on key risks.

Achievements and constraints of public finance for water and sanitation in Kenya. Interview with Samson Shivaji, CEO of KEWASNET

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW! Samson Shivaji is CEO of KEWASNET (the Kenya Water and Sanitation Civil Society Network), and the Kenyan Civil Society Organisation (CSO) Focal Person within the Sanitation and Water for All (SWA) platform. In this exclusive interview for PF4WASH, Mr. Shivaji responds to a series of questions about the need for increased public finance of sanitation in Kenya.

New Blog! Putting the spotlight on tough financing choices: the Batunga Toilet Challenge role play

by Marie-Alix Prat.
PF4WASH initiative at the World Water Week in Stockholm

NEW! Finance Brief 6: The UK Public Works Loans Board: central government loans for local government investment. By Richard Franceys

ABSTRACT: The UK’s Public Works Loans Board was a mechanism through which local government could access low-cost loans through central government. It played a key role in water and sanitation improvements in the UK between the 1870s and the 1980s. Until very recently, it remained a major vehicle for central-to-local government lending in the UK, and it has been a valuable template for many similar systems worldwide. This Finance Brief outlines the history of this body, still very relevant as a model today.

Open dumps a global health emergency

ISWA CALLS OPEN DUMPS A ‘GLOBAL HEALTH EMERGENCY  | | Source:  by Thomas Dimech | Resource, 8 September 2015 |

A new report by the International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) is highlighting the ‘global health emergency’ affecting tens of millions of people in developing countries who lack good sanitation infrastructure. iswa

The report, ‘Wasted Health: The Tragic Case of Dumpsites’, illustrates how the issues surrounding open dumpsites in the developed world 40 years ago are still prevalent in developing countries, but are also being compounded by unprecedented issues such as the unregulated accumulation of discarded electronics, mobile phones, and medical waste.

Some of the main problems identified in the report include:

  • open dumpsites receive roughly 40 per cent of the world’s waste and serve about 3.5 to 4 billion people;
  • there has been a substantial rise in unregulated dumping of mobile devices, electronic appliances, medical and municipal waste, accelerating the scale of the threat and health risks;
  • uncontrolled burning of waste releases gases and toxins into the atmosphere;
  • open waste sites in India, Indonesia and the Philippines are more detrimental to life expectancy than malaria;
  • 64 million people’s lives (equal to the population of France) are affected by world’s 50 largest dumpsites;
  • in addition to the human and environmental impacts, the financial cost of open dumpsites runs into the tens of billions of US dollars.

Continue reading

Small Doable Actions: A Feasible Approach to Behavior Change

Small Doable Actions: A Feasible Approach to Behavior Change, 2015. WASHplus.

A small doable action is a behavior that, when practiced consistently and correctly, will lead to personal and public health improvement. handwashing

It is considered feasible by the householder, from HIS/HER point of view, considering the current practice, the available resources, and the particular social context.

Although the behavior may not be an “ideal practice,” more households likely will adopt it because it is considered feasible within the local context