Toilet Board Coalition: India Round Table

Panel discussion highlighting our SMART SANITATION ECONOMY collaboration with the Pune Municipal Corporation and a focus on Sanitation Economy opportunities in India.

The Circular Sanitation Economy: Disruptive Innovation Festival Panel – Toilet Board Coalition

The Circular Sanitation Economy: The Commercial Case and Economics for the Biological Cycle in collaboration with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s Disruptive Innovation Festival and panel with our TBC experts and businesses.

Announcing our new Toilet Accelerator Cohort 2018! – Toilet Board Coalition

ANNOUNCING THE 2018 TOILET ACCELERATOR COHORT!
The new 2018 Toilet Accelerator Cohort and the Toilet Board Coalition Selection Committee highlight the innovative projects we will work on together.

 

Not All Toilets Look the Same: A Peak into Citywide Inclusive Sanitation on World Toilet Day – World Bank

Not All Toilets Look the Same: A Peak into Citywide Inclusive Sanitation on World Toilet Day. World Bank, November 17, 2017. CWIS-case-videos-KF

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • World Toilet Day – November 19 – is an apt time to recognize that proper sanitation is key to building thriving and healthy cities.
  • On World Toilet Day, we showcase a series of videos highlighting some good practices in ‘Citywide Inclusive Sanitation’ from around the world.
  • Citywide Inclusive Sanitation means everybody benefits from adequate sanitation, with human waste being safely managed at every point along the service chain.

Read the complete article.

World Toilet Day podcast with Jack Sim, founder of the World Toilet Organization

World Toilet Day podcast with Jack Sim – Finding Impact, November 14, 2017.

Jack Sim, Founder of the World Toilet Organization (WTO) has been a successful businessman for all of his adult life. After achieving financial success in his 40s, he felt a strong desire to give back to humanity. findingimpactlogo250px

Jack found that toilets were often neglected and grew concerned that the topic was draped in embarrassment and taboo. In 1998, he established the Restroom Association of Singapore (RAS) whose mission was to raise the standards of public toilets in Singapore and around the world.

Jack soon realized that there were other organizations worldwide like RAS, however, they lacked the channels to collaborate and share ideas. As a result, in 2001, Jack founded the World Toilet Organization (WTO), eventually earning himself the nickname Mr. Toilet.

On this podcast, we will cover:

  • Jack’s interest in tackling a problem that most people felt uncomfortable talking about and how he began to shift this taboo.
  • The origins of World Toilet Day (November 19) and how to be opportunistic when seeking partnerships.
  • The importance of relinquishing credit as a leader and remaining humble. Jack talks about creating a negative space that champions can sign up to eradicate, rather than focusing on being recognized for individual efforts.
  • How to get almost anything for free! While you don’t have resources, you do have a reputation and a story that businesses may want to align with.
  • How to leverage your story to bring attention to your cause. “If you don’t publish, you perish” Academics need to write, ask them how you can help! Helps bring credibility to your cause too.
  • The importance of being mission driven and removing individuals from the equation. “You are not the important thing, the mission is the important thing.”

WSUP – A guide to strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management: experience from Bangladesh, Kenya and Zambia

A guide to strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management: experience from Bangladesh, Kenya and Zambia. WSUP, November 2017. wsup

This Guide presents an introduction to conceptualising and strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management (FSM) services in low-income urban areas.

It is based on WSUP’s experience working with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop market-based solutions for on-site sanitation services in the cities of Dhaka and Chittagong (Bangladesh), Kisumu (Kenya) and Lusaka (Zambia).

Why is FSM so important?

FSM is the process by which faecal sludge is contained, collected, transported, treated and then safely disposed of or reused. 2.7 billion (38%) people around the world are dependent on on-site sanitation facilities like pit latrines and septic tanks, which contain and partially treat faecal sludge on-site (as opposed to centralised systems like sewers that remove waste from households and transport it to treatment facilities).

Read the complete report.

WaterAid – Out of Order: The State of the World’s Toilets 2017

Out of Order: The State of the World’s Toilets 2017. WaterAid, November 2017.

Our World Toilet Day report Out of Order explores how the lack of decent toilets around the world prevents women and girls from fulfilling their potential.

The report finds Ethiopia is now the country with the world’s highest percentage of people without toilets, while India remains the nation with the highest number of people without a toilet. wateraid

While both have made progress, millions still suffer the fear and indignity of relieving themselves in the open or in unsafe or unhygienic toilets – a situation which is most dangerous for girls and women.

Read the complete article.