Tag Archives: diarrheal diseases

Better Data Helps Defeat Diarrhea and Could Save Half a Million Kids – But We Need to Act Fast

Better Data Helps Defeat Diarrhea and Could Save Half a Million Kids – But We Need to Act Fast | Source: Huffington Post, Sept 27, 2016 | by Anita Zaidi , Director, Enteric and Diarrheal Diseases (EDD) program at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

When I was a young girl in Pakistan, my mother would remind me daily to only drink boiled water. We almost lost my sister to severe diarrhea and my mother was determined to make sure this didn’t happen to our family again.

gates

A village health and nutrition day at Aanganwadi Center Nankui Village, U.P., India on March 23, 2010.

Back then, I didn’t fully understand her. It wasn’t until years later, when I became a pediatrician and a child health researcher, that I realized how deadly watery stools can be.

Unlike for adults, the rapid loss of liquids caused by severe diarrhea can bring children and babies to the brink of death in a matter of hours.

Last year alone, over half a million children under five died from diarrheal diseases – that’s more than one every minute. And for those that survive, the resulting rapid dehydration and metabolic disturbances can lead to long-term damage to the gut and increased risk of malnutrition.

The sad truth is that the ripple effects of something as seemingly simple as a case of childhood diarrhea often extend far beyond health: children miss out on school, treatment costs can drive their families into poverty and in many countries, nursing a sick kid back to health can use up resources that are needed for other essentials like food or education.

Read the complete article.

DefeatDD: Superheroes vs. Villains

Published on Aug 29, 2016

Superheroes and villains face off in the battle to DefeatDD! With their powers combined, Nutrition, Vaccines, WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene), and ORS + Zinc help children, families, and communities conquer the biggest bugs terrorizing towns and sickening kids with diarrhea—Rotavirus, ETEC, Shigella, and Cryptosporidium.

Learn more at www.DefeatDD.org.

 

Crappy climate news: More heat means more diarrhea

Crappy climate news: More heat means more diarrhea | Source: The Daily Climate, Mar 2, 2016 |

A look at recent trends suggests developing countries will be burdened with millions more cases of diarrhea as the planet heats up

New climate research just plain stinks. As temperatures rise so, too, do cases of diarrhea in many countries. climate

The findings are serious, potty humor aside: The types of bacteria scientists expect to incite this surge already cause half a million deaths a year, mostly in developing countries that lack access to clean water.

Globally there are about 1.7 billion cases of diarrhea disease every year, according to the World Health Organization. These diseases, caused by bacteria like E. coli and Shigella, cause extreme dehydration, starving the body of necessary water and salts. With all causes taken into account—viral infections, bacteria, parasites, food allergies—around 760,000 children aged 5-years-old or younger die from diarrhea each year.

The study, published this week by Emory University scientists in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, highlights the interconnected nature of climate change, infectious disease and children’s health. Efforts to treat current diarrhea diseases risk being overwhelmed as temperatures rise and spur more illness.

800,000 more cases of diarrhea by 2035

In Bangladesh alone the Emory University researchers estimate an additional 800,000 cases of E. coli-driven diarrhea by 2035. Temperatures are projected to increase .8 degrees Celsius by then. By the end of the century, when temperatures are expected to be 2.1ºC higher than today, the researchers estimated an additional 2.2 million cases.

Read the complete article.

WASHplus Weekly on WASH-Related Diseases

This issue contains recent studies and resources on several WASH-related diseases: cholera, dengue, diarrhea, leptospirosis, neglected tropical diseases, malnutrition, and typhoid. Included are a just-published UNICEF cholera toolkit, an updated review of WASH-related diseases from DfID, typhoid case studies from Bangladesh and Fiji, and other resources. weekly2

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggested the topic for this issue, and we welcome other suggestions for topics. Future issues will focus on menstrual hygiene management, innovation, water point mapping, mobile applications, and WASH in schools; more than 100 past issues of the Weekly are archived on the WASHplus website.

New Global Study Pinpoints Main Causes of Childhood Diarrheal Diseases

New Global Study Pinpoints Main Causes of Childhood Diarrheal Diseases, Suggests Effective Solutions

A new international study published today in The Lancet provides the clearest picture yet of the impact and most common causes of diarrheal diseases, the second leading killer of young children globally, after pneumonia. The Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) is the largest study ever conducted on diarrheal diseases in developing countries, enrolling more than 20,000 children from seven sites across Asia and Africa.

GEMS, coordinated by the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Center for Vaccine Development, confirmed rotavirus – for which a vaccine already exists – as the leading cause of diarrheal diseases among infants and identified other top causes for which additional research is urgently needed. GEMS found that approximately one in five children under the age of two suffer from moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD) each year, which increased children’s risk of death 8.5-fold and led to stunted growth over a two-month follow-up period.

Continue reading

Chrysomya putoria, a Putative Vector of Diarrheal Diseases

PLoS Neglevted Trop Dis, Nov 2012

Chrysomya putoria, a Putative Vector of Diarrheal Diseases

Steven W. Lindsay, et al.

Author Summary – While it is well recognized that the house fly can transmit enteric pathogens, here we show the common African latrine fly, Chrysomya putoria, is likely to be an important vector of these pathogens, since an average latrine can produce 100,000 latrine flies each year. Our behavioral studies of flies in The Gambia show that latrine flies are attracted strongly to human feces, raw beef and fish, providing a clear mechanism for faecal pathogens to be transferred from faeces to food. We used PCR techniques to demonstrate that these flies are carrying Shigella, Salmonella and E. coli, all important causes of diarrhea. Moreover our culture work shows that these pathogens are viable. Latrine flies are likely to be important vectors of diarrheal disease, although further research is required to determine what proportion of infections are due to this fly.

Background – Chrysomya spp are common blowflies in Africa, Asia and parts of South America and some species can reproduce in prodigious numbers in pit latrines. Because of their strong association with human feces and their synanthropic nature, we examined whether these flies are likely to be vectors of diarrheal pathogens.

Methodology/Principal Findings – Flies were sampled using exit traps placed over the drop holes of latrines in Gambian villages. Odor-baited fly traps were used to determine the relative attractiveness of different breeding and feeding media. The presence of bacteria on flies was confirmed by culture and bacterial DNA identified using PCR. A median of 7.00 flies/latrine/day (IQR = 0.0–25.25) was collected, of which 95% were Chrysomya spp, and of these nearly all were Chrysomya putoria (99%). More flies were collected from traps with feces from young children (median = 3.0, IQR = 1.75–10.75) and dogs (median = 1.50, IQR = 0.0–13.25) than from herbivores (median = 0.0, IQR = 0.0–0.0; goat, horse, cow and calf; p<0.001). Flies were strongly attracted to raw meat (median = 44.5, IQR = 26.25–143.00) compared with fish (median = 0.0, IQR = 0.0–19.75, ns), cooked and uncooked rice, and mangoes (median = 0.0, IQR = 0.0–0.0; p<0.001). Escherichia coli were cultured from the surface of 21% (15/72 agar plates) of Chrysomya spp and 10% of these were enterotoxigenic. Enteroaggregative E. coli were identified by PCR in 2% of homogenized Chrysomya spp, Shigella spp in 1.4% and Salmonella spp in 0.6% of samples.

Conclusions/Significance – The large numbers of C. putoria that can emerge from pit latrines, the presence of enteric pathogens on flies, and their strong attraction to raw meat and fish suggests these flies may be common vectors of diarrheal diseases in Africa.

WASHplus Weekly – Focus on WASH-Related Diseases

Issue 58 June 1, 2012 | Focus on WASH-Related Diseases

The World Health Organization lists more than 20 diseases that are related to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) conditions. This issue focuses on three of those:

  • cholera,
  • diarrhea, and
  • typhoid fever

Information and resources for each of the three diseases include fact sheets, videos, recent peer-review studies, and links to additional resources. Future issues will focus on additional WASH-related diseases.