Tag Archives: Ethiopia

Study examines sustainability of CLTS programmes in Africa

Plan-ODF-sustainability-coverDespite the widespread implementation of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programs and many claims of success, there has been very little systematic investigation into their sustainability.  A new study, which aims to change that, is creating a stir in the WASH sector.

A study commissioned by Plan International on the sustainability of CLTS programs in Africa revealed that 87% of the households still had a functioning latrine. This would indicate a remarkably low rate of reversion (13%) to open defecation (OD) or “slippage”.

However, if the criteria used to originally award open defecation free (ODF) status to villages are used, then the overall slippage rate increased dramatically to  92%. These criteria are:

  • A functioning latrine with a superstructure
  • A means of keeping flies from the pit (either water seal or lid)
  • Absence of excreta in the vicinity of the house
  • Hand washing facilities with water and soap or soap-substitute such as ash
  • Evidence that the latrine and hand washing facilities were being used

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Creative measures improve sanitation programmes in eight African countries

Sapling handwashing, Malawi.

Sapling handwashing, Malawi. Photo: Plan Malawi

Eight African countries are creatively achieving the goals of community led total sanitation programmes (CLTS) including one idea in Malawi where handwashing is monitored according to the health of tree seedlings planted beneath water outlets.

In Zambia several schools have established vegetable gardens to reduce malnutrition and improve school attendance. Some of the harvests have been sold raising funds for school activities.

In Sierra Leone men have traditionally been the community leaders but women are now being encouraged to play a major part in village committees and networks of natural leaders.  To support CLTS women conduct house-to-house monitoring, giving health talks and reporting diseases –- many of them overcoming challenges such as illiteracy to maintain the programme.

Plan International’s five year Pan African CLTS (PAC) programme which ends in December, 2014, is operating in the eight countries of Sierra Leone, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Zambia and Malawi, Ghana and Niger. With the backing of the Dutch government the project was designed to promote and scale up sanitation in communities and schools.

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Leveraging Partnerships to Achieve Total Sanitation in East Africa

A 2010 analysis showed that most East African countries have national sanitation policies and plans in place, but that the actual programs often lack coordination. To meet the Millennium Development Goals for sanitation, such programs must combine their efforts to achieve behavior-change outcomes and focus on commonalities, which include an emphasis on learning, demand creation, and capacity building.

These key understandings are among several discussed in a new Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) Learning Note, Partnering on the Road Towards Achieving Total Sanitation in East Africa. The report highlights the objectives and initial outcomes of a learning exchange held in Tanzania, which focused on how governments and agencies can work effectively as partners to achieve sustained sanitation scale up.

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Viva con Agua Water Days 2011

This third international festival for clean water is a multi-country fundraising event involving over 70 cultural events in 24 cities in Germany, Switzerland and Spain from 11-22 November 2011.

German NGO Viva con Agua is organising the event in collaboration with Welthungerhilfe, Helvetas and Acción contra el Hambre.

Events in Germany will raise funds for a rural water and sanitation project in Amhara, Ethiopia, implemented by Welthungerhilfe and supported by the German NGO Viva con Agua. Besides concerts and football tournaments, there will be a WASH Social Art Festival in Hamburg.

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Learning by Doing: Working at Scale in Ethiopia

In the Amhara Region of Ethiopia, the Learning by Doing Initiative (LBDI), a joint project between the Government of Ethiopia, the Amhara Regional Health Bureau, USAID’s Hygiene Improvement Project (HIP), and the Water and Sanitation Program, started at large scale and then expanded, growing from an initial 93,000 households in four districts to include 5.8 million people in 94 districts.  LBDI resulted in 2.8 million more people stopping the practice of open defecation.

In  Learning by Doing: Working at Scale in Ethiopia, Kebede Faris and Julia Rosenbaum summarize key strategies and lessons from LBDI. Continue reading

Ethiopia – Reflections on School-Led Total Sanitation

School-Led Total Sanitation: Reflections on the Potential of the Shebedino Pilot, March 2011.

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Robert Chambers

This note is based on two field visits, in November 2010 and 23 February 2011, discussions with Berhanu Tunsisa and others in Plan Ethiopia, and with Government staff and others in Shebedino, and the findings of the February 2011 Assessment Report on School-led Total Sanitation: Shebedino Program Unit, by Fisseha Atalie. This report is timely and a useful source of insight and ideas. It includes a comparison of CLTS and SLTS carried out by the Regional Health Bureau and Plan Ethiopia staff.

From an international perspective this innovation is unique. To my knowledge, this is the first time anywhere in the world that teachers have been systematically engaged in triggering CLTS. This began only in October 2010 and has already been applied to achieve 100 per cent coverage in 6 kebeles. If it continues to work well, it may provide a means for going to scale faster with CLTS in Ethiopia.

Ethiopia – Ministry to count water, sanitation, hygiene facilities

Jan 29, 2011 – The Ministry of Water and Energy said that it has finalized preparations to begin counting the number of potable water, sanitation and hygiene facilities available in the country.

Ministry Public Relations and Communication Directorate Director, Bizuneh Tolcha, told WIC today that the counting process will be carried out from February-June, 2011.

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Sustainable Sanitation Practice: The ROSA Project

Issue 4 of Sustainable Sanitation Practice (SSP), published by the EcoSan Club, Austria,  is s special issue that presents the highlights and main findings of the EU-funded ROSA (Resource-Oriented Sanitation concepts for peri-urban areas in Africa) project.
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The ROSA project was implemented in four pilot cities: Arba Minch in Ethiopia, Nakuru in Kenya, Arusha in Tanzania, and Kitgum in Uganda.

The 7 papers included in this special issue show specific aspects of the as well as an outlook on future activities. Topics covered include scaling-up ecosan toilets in Ethiopia, urine-diversion dry toilets in schools in Kenya, urban agriculture in Tanzania, operation and maintenance, and the development of Strategic Sanitation and Waste Plans (SSWPs).

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WSP – Stepping Onto the Sanitation Ladder: Stopping Open Defecation in Rural Ethiopia

Ethiopia: Nearly a quarter of Addis residents lack toilets

ADDIS ABABA, 20 April 2010 (IRIN) – Almost a quarter of Addis Ababa residents have no access to toilets, says a new report by the Addis Ababa city authorities.

“We estimate that some three million people live in Addis Ababa. Out of this nearly 25 percent of the population have no access to toilets and defecate in rivers crossing the city” the report says.

“We cannot tolerate any more waste in rivers and roads. We should be ashamed. We want to make sure that the city is clean and a better place to live,” said Mekuria Haile, a senior local government official, at the launch of the report entitled:  Cleaning and Beautifying Addis Ababa: Intensifying Environmental and Health Issues with Public Participation.

“Addis Ababa is one of the biggest cities in sub-Saharan Africa… but is still fighting against solid waste management and health problems posed by unsafe drinking water and inadequate sanitation,” said Haile.

The outbreak of acute watery diarrhoea (AWD) which hit most parts of the city in August 2009 “was the result of poor sanitation and hygiene, coupled with solid waste from the city” the report said.

“I cannot trust the water that comes through a pipeline since that outbreak. I boil my water every day before serving my family,” said Senait Habte, a resident of the city’s Kolfe Keraniyo slum.

“My relatives in rural Ethiopia live a better life than us in the city. They have good toilets and access to safe drinking water. Seems like the government has forgotten us,” she told IRIN, adding: “There are continuous electricity blackouts. Sometimes we don’t have water for five days. Life is becoming difficult in Addis nowadays.”

Public relations chief at the Water Resources Ministry Bizuneh Tolcha told IRIN nearly 66 percent of the Ethiopian population has access to safe drinking water and 56 percent has access to a latrine.
 
“According to our water tests, the water in Addis is very clean but the problem is contamination due to its unsafe use,” Tolcha told IRIN.

The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says 60-80 percent of the current disease burden in Ethiopia is attributable to environmental health risks, which include poor hygiene and inadequate sanitation.
 
Eco-toilets

US-based NGO Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and its partners have been promoting an ecological toilet called the ArborLoo, designed by Zimbabwean Peter Morgan specifically for African conditions. It serves both as a basic toilet and makes use of excreta for growing fruit trees.

The AborLoo is a single pit shallow compost toilet 1.0-1.5m deep comprising a ring beam, slab and structure.

“Each concrete toilet slab costs US$7-20 and anyone can use it. It best suits the elderly and disabled people. You can dig it in half a day and can also plant trees on it,” says Bekele Abaire, programme manager at the CRS office in Ethiopia.

During use, fly and odour problems are reduced by regularly adding soil, wood ash and leaves to the excreta in the pit. Once full, the old toilet site is covered with soil and left to compost with the parts of the toilet being moved to another place, rebuilt and used in the same way again.

A tree is planted on the old site, preferably at the start of the rainy season, after the old pit contents have composted for a while.

“All of my family used to defecate at the back of our house or in an open field. This is the case everywhere in our `kebele’ [district]; it is normal. We now understand that latrines are important for our hygiene and health. ArborLoo has helped us a lot. We plant fruits, vegetables, trees and above all we are safe from acute watery diarrhoea and other diseases,” said Seid Abdo who is now using ArborLoo in Arsi Zone, Oromiya Regional State.

“Many communities achieved 100 percent sanitation coverage in areas that had 1 percent or less [coverage] before the project. And surprisingly none of these areas were affected by AWD, while others suffered from it,” Bekele told IRIN.

“We are trying to implement more eco toilet projects in Addis Ababa. We want to scale it up in urban areas like Addis Ababa and Adama but we are challenged by lack of adequate policy and lack of funding,” Bekele told IRIN.

Source – http://www.irinnews.org/Report.aspx?ReportId=88861