Tag Archives: financing

RWSN webinars on WASH financing

RWSN is delighted to announce a new mini-series of webinars (on-line seminars) . This mini-series will address issues around financing rural water supply services, but also on how to make RWSN work better for you as part of a new strategy for the network.

Each session will be bilingual, with one webinar in English as well as another language (French or Spanish) as we are trying to cater for a wide and varied audience. The webinars in English start at 2.30 pm Paris time/ 1.30 pm London time/ 8.30 am Washington DC time (check your local time here):

  • Tuesday, 14th November, 2017: “Grown up” finance for rural water? We all agree that there is a need for more money in order ensure sustainable rural water service provision and to reach SDG 6.1. To give an idea of the scale of the challenge: (i) Reaching SDG 6 targets 1 and 2 only requires an estimated 114 billion US$/year for capital investments –  three times what is currently spent. (ii) Capital maintenance of existing water services is estimated to cost around 1.5 times the amount needed for capital investments and (iii) the amount needed for direct support of rural WASH services is at an absolute minimum 1 US$ per person per year. But where will this money come from? Join us to explore “grown up” financing for rural water and the financial bankability of rural water services. (Register here) 
  • Thursday, 16th November, 2017: A Dollar per year keeps rural water services here? The costs of direct support. Rural water service providers, regardless of whether they are community-based organisations, small public utilities or private entrepreneurs, need direct support and supervision in order to provide good quality water services. Local government commonly plays an important role in providing such direct support services. But what do these direct support services cost? Join us to explore and discuss the costs of direct support to rural water services. (Register here)
  • RWSN – Rural Water Supply Network
  • RWSN Website: http://www.rural-water-supply.net/en/
  • Join the Network: http://dgroups.org/RWSN

 

World Bank, WSSCC Highlight Sanitation Financing Needs

World Bank, WSSCC Highlight Sanitation Financing Needs. IISD SDG Knowledge Hub, May 9, 2017.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • International organizations highlighted the need to adequately finance urban sanitation for the 2.4 billion of the world’s population with poor access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH).

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  • The World Bank estimates that financing WASH will require US$114 billion annually until the year 2030.
  • The World Bank, World Water Council and World Water Supply & Sanitation Council (WSSCC) launched projects for WASH facilities at local markets and other places where women work, with menstrual hygiene an important focus.

Read the complete article.

Webinar – Involving The Private Sector In Increasing Access To Basic Sanitation In Bihar And Abidjan

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Published on Apr 24, 2017

Only 22% of Abidjan’s population has access to basic sanitation. Many low-income residents of the city live in compound houses of 4 to 45 persons, who share a common toilet.

The situation is not too different in Bihar where only 30% of the population have access to basic sanitation, and open defecation is still rife.

This webinar explores successes and failures of the strategies from:

  • the USAID Sanitation Service Delivery (SSD) program’s Healthy Compound model in Abidjan, which is using a total market approach to develop prefabricated septic tanks made of ferrocement; and
  • the Supporting Sustainable Sanitation (3Si) project in Bihar, which has used a market-based approach to overcome supply and demand barriers to latrine access and use.

    Presenters:

  • Bikas Sinha is 3Si’s General Manager for Programs. He will introduce the 3Si project and strategy and outline the milestones and learning.
  • Lassina Togola is USAID SSD’s sanitation Technical Advisor in Abidjan. He will offer first-hand experience of progress, lessons and challenges to date regarding the Healthy Compound model.
  • Dana Ward is SSD’s Chief of Party. He will introduce the discussion and set the context for providing affordable sanitation through the private sector.

In addition to the recorded webinar, the following supplementary resources are available:

Case studies in blended finance for water and sanitation

Case studies in blended finance for water and sanitation, 2016. Water and Sanitation Program.

This report has case studies on facilitating access to finance for household investment in sanitation in Bangladesh, Cambodia, South Africa and other countries.

 

 

Eight ideas to fund access to water and toilets for all by 2030

Eight ideas to fund access to water and toilets for all by 2030 | Source: The Guardian, September 19 2016 |

Some $114bn is needed each year to reach the SDG on water and sanitation. Our panel of experts share their ideas on how to raise the money 

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How do we raise the funds needed to improve access to water and sanitation for millions? Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

1 | Crack down on illicit financial flows and tax evasion
An estimated $1tn [£0.8tn] flows illegally out of developing countries and emerging economies each year – more than they receive in foreign direct investment and aid combined. Beyond bleeding the world’s poorest economies, this propels crime, corruption and tax evasion. Most of the money is lost through trade mis-invoicing – where trade invoices are manipulated to change the value to secretly move money across borders. Folks in the water and sanitation sector could help promote the importance of raising more domestic revenue by combating tax evasion and avoidance, and push for some of that money to go towards water and sanitation projects. Christine Clough, programme manager, Global Financial Integrity

2 | Increase public investment
The most important route towards financing sanitation and water is increased domestic government investment. For example, a recent estimate of the annual sanitation financing gap in Ghana is $93m [£71m]. Ghana’s GDP is around $38bn [£28bn] and its total tax revenues amount to about 21% of GDP – a pretty good percentage for a low- to middle-income country. But the Ghanaian government currently invests only $7m [£5m] yearly in sanitation: a tiny, trivial amount. If it were instead to invest 0.5% of GDP in sanitation, we’d be looking at about $190m [£145m] – more than enough to cover the country’s financing gap. The bottom line is that countries need to use equitable taxation to support the provision of basic services for poorer citizens. Guy Norman, director of research & evaluation, WSUP

Read the complete article.

Live Q&A: $114bn a year needed for water and toilets – where will it come from?

Live Q&A: $114bn a year needed for water and toilets – where will it come from? | Source: The Guardian, Sept 8, 2016 |

How do we raise funds needed to reach the millions without access to water and sanitation? Discuss with an expert panel on 15 September, 3–4.30pm BST

About $28.4bn (£21.2bn) is spent each year to provide access to water and sanitation around the world. If this investment is maintained, by 2030 everyone will have access to drinking water, an adequate toilet, and a suitable place to wash their hands.

toilets

Access to clean and affordable water and a safe place to go to the toilet will cost $114bn a year. Photograph: Rupak de Chowdhuri/Reuters

But the sustainable development goals go beyond just basic access; they envision a world where everyone has access to clean and affordable drinking water and a safe place to go to the toilet. This level of access will cost $114bn a year, the World Bank estimates.

The water and finance communities need to find ways to triple current levels of investment, and they need to do it quickly. “We’re already one year into the SDGs,” says Bill Kingdom, global lead for water supply and sanitation at the World Bank’s Water Global Practice. “If we carry on with business as usual for the next year, that’s two years gone, and that $114bn a year becomes $127bn for the remaining 13 years.”

Which innovative ideas could realistically help raise the additional $85.6bn needed annually? What will make the water industry attractive to lenders? How do we address the privatisation of services and make sure water and sanitation is affordable for all?

Join an expert panel on Thursday 15 September, from 3pm to 4.30pm BST, to discuss these questions and more.

Read the complete article.

Approaches to Capital Financing and Cost Recovery in Sewerage Schemes Implemented in India: Lessons Learned and Approaches for Future Schemes

Approaches to Capital Financing and Cost Recovery in Sewerage Schemes Implemented in India: Lessons Learned and Approaches for Future Schemes, 2016. Water and Sanitation Program.

This report aims to highlight some of the successful financial management practices adopted by Urban Local Bodies (ULBs) in India when implementing sewerage schemes. The findings are presented in two parts – the first part of the report discusses the approach adopted for capital financing of sewerage schemes in the state of Tamil Nadu, and the second part presents the findings from a review of the operational expenditure and revenue generation of various ULBs across the country.

The aim of the report is to share successful capital financing and cost recovery practices adopted by ULBs in India and enable improvement in provisioning of sewerage systems (only where feasible and economically viable, typically only in larger towns with a population greater than 50,000) and ensure availability of sufficient funds for proper Operation and Maintenance (O&M) of the schemes implemented.