Tag Archives: hospitals

A Third Of Hospitals In Developing Nations Don’t Have Clean Water

A Third Of Hospitals In Developing Nations Don’t Have Clean Water: Study | Source: Huffington Post, June 23, 2016 |

Doctors often operate with dirty instruments because they have no other choice

At least a third of hospitals in developing nations do not have clean running water, a study has found, leading to unsanitary conditions and further spread of disease in drought-hit areas.

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YIDA REFUGEE CAMP, SOUTH SUDAN – JToto Kafi, 2 years, lays in a hospital bed suffering from painful skin infections and malnourishment at the MSF ( Medecins Sans Frontieres ) hospital inside the Yida refugee camp. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

The study examined 430 hospitals in developing countries and found that one third of clinics did not have a reliable source of clean water to perform surgical operations.

Water availability ranged from 20 percent in Sierra Leone and Liberia to more than 90 percent in India, Malaysia and Guinea, according to the report, which used World Bank data and analysed previous studies between 2009 and 2015.

“Running water is something we take for granted and it doesn’t exist in a third of hospitals in these countries,” said Adam Kushner, lead author of the study, published in the Journal of Surgical Research.

“Instead of water just being there, some hospitals truck in water or collect it in rain barrels, with no guarantee of its cleanliness,” said Kushner, an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University who is also a surgeon.

Every year, half a million babies die before they are one-month-old due to a lack of clean water and safe sanitation in hospitals, according to a 2015 report by sanitation charity WaterAid and the World Health Organisation (WHO).

Read the complete article.

UNC and P&G to Provide First Analysis of Environmental Health in Malawi Hospitals

UNC and P&G to Provide First Analysis of Environmental Health in Malawi Hospitals | Source: UNC News, May 15 2016 |

Millions of Malawians seek medical care in the country’s health care facilities each year. Yet, an analysis of the environmental health status in these facilities has never been performed. This summer, baseline measurements will be collected thanks to a partnership between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Procter & Gamble (P&G) through the Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program (CSDW).

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Patients being cared for at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Malawi.

“Health facilities should not be places to acquire infection due to lack of clean water, hygiene and sanitation; they should be places for cure,” says Innocent Mofolo, associate country director of UNC Project-Malawi. “WaSH should be part of an integrated approach to health and human development. This assessment will help determine WaSH gaps that exist in most of our health facilities and devise strategies to improve the situation.”

The assessment of 45 health facilities in the northern, central and southern regions of Malawi is being funded by a generous donation from P&G. Data collection will begin in August by researchers from the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases and its UNC Project in Malawi and the Water Institute at UNC.

Read the complete article.

 

Treat your sanitation workers well

There are two contrasting stories this week on the treatment of sanitation workers: in China a local restaurant treats 180 of them to a free lunch, while in Gaza they go on strike after having received no pay for over six months.

More than 180 sanitation workers in Chengdu, Sichuan province enjoyed a free lunch courtesy of a local hotpot restaurant.

More than 180 sanitation workers in Chengdu, Sichuan province enjoyed a free lunch courtesy of a local hotpot restaurant. Photo: weibo.com

Sanitation workers in China get low pay, have poor working conditions and work long hours. Mr. Li, a restaurant owner in Chengdu, decided it was time to show some appreciation for their hard work, especially now as temperatures were dropping. He offered over 180 local sanitation workers a free lunch; they were “encouraged to order whatever they wanted, including alcohol”, writes Dina Li in the Shanghaiist.

The free lunch was also a compensation for the mess created when Mr Li opened his new restaurant and employees distributed more than 100,000 leaflets, most of which ended up on the streets for sanitation workers to clean up.

Waste piles up in Al-Shifa Hospital, Gaza Strip, as a result of strike by sanitation workers.

Waste piles up in Al-Shifa Hospital, Gaza Strip, as a result of strike by sanitation workers. Photo: Mohammad Asad, MEMO

How differently sanitation workers are treated in the Gaza Strip. Since the formation of the Palestinian unity government in June 2014, they have not received any pay. This has spurred a strike with severe consequences for the health care system. The accumulation of large piles of waste and garbage has forced the Al-Shifa Hospital to stop all work in their operation and emergency rooms.

Deputy Minister of Health, Yusuf Abu Al-Reesh warned of dangerous health conditions inside the hospitals and medical centres in Gaza since staff from the private sanitation companies went on strike.

Source:

  • Dina Li, Chengdu hotpot restaurant treats over 180 sanitation workers to free lunch, Shanghaiist, 5 Dec 2014
  • Gaza sanitation workers’ strike stalls hospital operations, Middle East Monitor, 4 Dec 2014

Sierra Leone: Kenema Hospital Undergoes Toilet Rehab

The Kenema district development mission, a group of Sierra Leoneans based in the United States, has commenced the rehabilitation of the deplorable state of the toilets at the government hospital following persistent cries from patients and members of the public for the facilities to be improved.

Chairman of the group, Francis Samba said as Sierra Leoneans and natives of the district, it should be their responsibility to always come to the aid of the community, especially on developmental matters.

He said the toilet condition, as reported by the hospital management, has been appalling, thus making it compelling for them to intervene and solve the problem.

“We are currently residing in the USA but we are very concern about the health of our people and the community. The toilet project, which is worth about Le7 million [US$ 109,000], will greatly benefit members of the hospital; we will continue to help whenever the need arises,” he said.

[…] Medical superintendent, Samuel Sesay […] assured the group that the toilets would be properly maintained.

Source: Abrahim Abdulai, Concord Times / allAfrica.com, 27 Jan 2009

Afghanistan: medical waste poses health risk in urban areas

Solid waste produced by the health-care system in Kabul and other major cities is not being properly managed and poses a serious public health risk, according to health experts.

Medical waste – including used needles and syringes, soiled dressings, body parts, diagnostic samples, blood, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and medical devices – is lying in open rubbish dumps near hospitals in urban areas.

[…]

Afghanistan does not have bylaws on the safe management of medical waste, and over 60 public and private hospitals in Kabul do not have incinerators or other equipment to deal with the problem.

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At least seven children involved in scavenging in Herat Province, western Afghanistan, have been infected by hepatitis B, syphilis and suspected cases of HIV, the Children Protection Action Network (C-PAN) reported.

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Officials at Kabul Municipality also reported at least two suspected cases of hepatitis B among city cleaners in September.

Related web site: WHO – Healthcare Waste Management

Source: IRIN, 14 Oct 2008

Australia: Hand washing in doctors remains poor

7th August 2008, AUK Staff

Hand washing amongst doctors remains poor according to results of an Australian study. This is despite both local and national education to promote the benefits of having clean hands when seeing patients. Doctors have come out worse than other healthcare professionals in their adherence to keeping their extremities free of germs. (…)

Read all AnaesthesiaUK

Cote d’Ivoire: Clean up campaign for hospitals

ABIDJAN, 31 March 2008 (IRIN) – Hygiene in most hospitals in Cote d’Ivoire is so low that the ministry of health has launched a nationwide clean-up campaign. […] The director of public health Alexandre N’Guessan said he believed that most of the infections occur because medical waste has not been properly disposed of as health workers are not following established norms.

Read more: IRIN, 31 Mar 2008