Tag Archives: IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre

Seminar on monitoring of decentralised WASH services in West Africa

This is a bilingual seminar on Monitoring the decentralised delivery of WASH services in rural areas and small towns in West Africa in Ouagagoudou, Burkina Faso organised by IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre and pS-Eau.

Date: 07 – 09 April 2014

Designed in priority for stakeholders working in collaboration with local governments, this seminar will be an opportunity to share experiences in the field of monitoring WASH services at local level in West Africa.

The seminar will be structured around four themes:

  1. Monitoring and evaluation to support local governments’ water and sanitation strategic planning
  2. Monitoring and evaluation to improve water, sanitation and hygiene services
  3. Monitoring and evaluation to manage water and sanitation services
  4. Monitoring and evaluation to regulate water and sanitation services

but related topics are also of interest to the organisers.

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 17 February 2014

More information: www.irc.nl/page/82341

IRC launches reference guide on non-sewered sanitation

Photo: IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre

Photo: IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre

Sanitation experts at IRC have compiled the first version of a reference guide on low-cost sanitation for non-sewered service models, SanPack for short.  Dr Christine Sijbesma and Joep Verhagen have collected materials that cover services for all stages of the sanitation life cycle, from preparation activities to the emptying, recycling and productive use of toilet contents. Per stage you can find a short intro text and links that lead you to relevant documents on a specific topic.

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Akvopedia Sustainability Portal launched

Akvopedia Icon

Akvopedia has launched a new water and sanitation portal on sustainability. Developed by Akvo in collaboration with IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre, the portal provides simple outlines of sustainability frameworks, such as the IRC’s Triple-S framework, as well as the FIETS approach, which was developed by the Dutch WASH Alliance and takes into account five key areas of sustainability – financial, institutional, environmental, technical and social. These key areas have been chosen as the five pillars of the portal’s main page.

Web sitewww.akvopedia.org/wiki/Sustainability_Portal

Extended call for abstracts: West Africa Workshop “Towards sustainable total sanitation”:

West Africa Learning and Exchange Workshop “Towards sustainable total sanitation”

Cotonou, Benin, 12-14 November 2013

Organised by: IRC, UNICEF, WaterAid and SNV

This workshop targets sanitation practitioners that have hands-on experience with the implementation of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programmes and projects and aims to bring together professionals working on rural sanitation in West Africa, particularly practitioners, researchers, policy makers, and people from government agencies, donors and media.

It will emphasise the role of CLTS, with a geographical focus on West Africa; the roles of hygiene/sanitation behaviour change and the enabling environment around CLTS and other sanitation improvement approaches.

The workshop will build on the sanitation life cycle framework as developed by IRC and also reflect on methodological experience from IRC’s past learning and sharing exchanges and workshops in the field of Sanitation & Hygiene.

The participation fee is free although participants must take care of their own travel and accommodation costs.

Abstract deadline extended to: 27 September 2013

Abstract form can be downloaded here

More information at: www.irc.nl/page/79226

Read the First Announcement and Call for Abstracts

Creative measures improve sanitation programmes in eight African countries

Sapling handwashing, Malawi.

Sapling handwashing, Malawi. Photo: Plan Malawi

Eight African countries are creatively achieving the goals of community led total sanitation programmes (CLTS) including one idea in Malawi where handwashing is monitored according to the health of tree seedlings planted beneath water outlets.

In Zambia several schools have established vegetable gardens to reduce malnutrition and improve school attendance. Some of the harvests have been sold raising funds for school activities.

In Sierra Leone men have traditionally been the community leaders but women are now being encouraged to play a major part in village committees and networks of natural leaders.  To support CLTS women conduct house-to-house monitoring, giving health talks and reporting diseases –- many of them overcoming challenges such as illiteracy to maintain the programme.

Plan International’s five year Pan African CLTS (PAC) programme which ends in December, 2014, is operating in the eight countries of Sierra Leone, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Zambia and Malawi, Ghana and Niger. With the backing of the Dutch government the project was designed to promote and scale up sanitation in communities and schools.

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Research call for commercially viable processing of pit latrine contents

IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre announces a research call for: Commercially viable processing of pit latrine contents: using a mix of human faeces, chicken manure and silage material.

This call is part of the BRAC WASH II programme in which EUR 1.5 million will be used for innovative research, tendered to consortia of leading European and Bangladeshi research organisations.

The planned duration of the research project will be 12 months. The anticipated cost of the project is EUR 325,000.

Guidelines for research call

Application form

Send full proposal application forms to bracactionresearch@irc.nl by 30 August 2013

Getting hygiene messages with your tea

Tea stall owner and male visitors

Tea stall owner and male visitors [IRC/Ingeborg Krukkert]


While on a mission in Bangladesh I visited a tea stall where I saw a lot of men getting their daily cup of tea. Tea stalls are a common phenomenon in Bangladesh, it is a place where people gather not just for tea, but to hang out and talk freely about whatever is important to them. Male field workers in the BRAC WASH programme have started visiting these stalls to discuss sanitation and hygiene practices.

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