Tag Archives: Malawi

Microfinance as a potential cataylst for improved sanitation

. Summary of sanitation lending and product delivery models. Water for People

. Summary of sanitation lending and product delivery models. Water for People

Microfinance allows middle- and lower-income households to invest in desirable sanitation products, so that public funding can be freed up to reach the poorest, according to Water for People (WfP). In a new report [1], WfP reviews their experiences in piloting various lending models in seven countries: Bolivia, Guatemala, India, Malawi, Peru, Rwanda and Uganda.

The report provides lessons and recommendations for donors wishing to engage in sanitation microfinancing. The four key recommendations are:

  1. Think like a business
  2. Support lending institutions based on the microfinance climate and capacity needs
  3. Build an autonomous sanitation microfinance market
  4. Track progress and lessons

The report is part of WfP’s Sanitation as a Business (SaaB) program, funded by a Gates Foundation grant.

Read the full report

[1]  Chatterley, C. et al, 2013. Microfinance as a potential catalyst for improved sanitation : a synthesis of Water For People’s sanitation lending experiences in seven countries. Denver, CO,USA: Water For People. Available at: <http://www.waterforpeople.org/assets/files/sanitation-microfinance.pdf>

Source: Christie Chatterley et al., Microfinance as a potential cataylst for improved sanitation, Water for People, 27 Dec 2013

Creative measures improve sanitation programmes in eight African countries

Sapling handwashing, Malawi.

Sapling handwashing, Malawi. Photo: Plan Malawi

Eight African countries are creatively achieving the goals of community led total sanitation programmes (CLTS) including one idea in Malawi where handwashing is monitored according to the health of tree seedlings planted beneath water outlets.

In Zambia several schools have established vegetable gardens to reduce malnutrition and improve school attendance. Some of the harvests have been sold raising funds for school activities.

In Sierra Leone men have traditionally been the community leaders but women are now being encouraged to play a major part in village committees and networks of natural leaders.  To support CLTS women conduct house-to-house monitoring, giving health talks and reporting diseases –- many of them overcoming challenges such as illiteracy to maintain the programme.

Plan International’s five year Pan African CLTS (PAC) programme which ends in December, 2014, is operating in the eight countries of Sierra Leone, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Zambia and Malawi, Ghana and Niger. With the backing of the Dutch government the project was designed to promote and scale up sanitation in communities and schools.

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UNICEF/Malawi: CLTS Triggering Tools: How to Trigger for Hand Washing with Soap

UNICEF/Malawi: CLTS Triggering Tools: How to Trigger for Hand Washing with Soap, March 2013.

An Excerpt: The tools outlined by this document were developed based on actual field research in testing, done as a collaborative effort between UNICEF and Salima District Council. Salima was selected for the research and testing of new hand washing triggering tools because they already had experience attempting to incorporate hand washing into their triggering process, and also have data showing high numbers of new hand washing facilities being built after CLTS. Also, Salima was selected because they implement CLTS continuously as part of their routine extension staff work.

Nine different tools were tested for how well they instilled a realization of the importance of hand washing with soap (HWWS). When these tools were used, hand washing practice increased by 69% and soap availability at hand washing facilities increased by 15%, compared to when CLTS didn’t include specific
tools to trigger HWWS. However please take these guidelines with a grain of salt, as they are based on a small sample size, overall only a few villages.

THE 10 FIELD-TESTED HAND WASHING TRIGGERING TOOLS OUTLINED IN THIS DOCUMENT:

  • Anal Cleansing Materials
  • Shit and Shake
  • Cassava/Egg Demonstration
  • Charcoal
  • Smelly Hands
  • Charcoal Smearing
  • Scratch & Smell
  • Wall Contamination
  • Food Sharing
  • Dirt Under Fingernails

Equity of Access to WASH in Schools: A Comparative Study of Policy and Service Delivery

Equity of Access to WASH in Schools: A Comparative Study of Policy and Service Delivery in Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, the Philippines, Timor-Leste, Uganda and Uzbekistan.

Emory University; Unicef.

EXCERPTS: Equity_of_Access_to_WASH_in_SchoolsUnderstanding the mechanisms by which children are excluded from WASH in Schools is essential to ensuring adequate and equitable access for all school-aged children.

‘Equity of Access to WASH in Schools’ presents findings from a six-country study conducted by UNICEF and the Center for Global Safe Water at Emory University. This research was carried out in collaboration with UNICEF country offices in Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, the Philippines, Timor-Leste, Uganda and Uzbekistan and their partners. The six case studies presented together contribute to the broader understanding of inequities in WASH in Schools access by describing various dimensions that contribute to equitable or
inequitable access across regions, cultures, gender and communities.

The researchers identified key dimensions of equity through formative investigations that included discussions with service delivery providers and policymakers. In some countries, inequity existed but was found to be linked to poverty and the prioritization of other health and development objectives, rather than a specific policy. In other cases, some dimensions could not be fully investigated, usually due to lack of data. Because it was not feasible to explore every equity dimension in each of the six countries, focus areas were prioritized for each case study.

Some dimensions were found to be relevant across country contexts. Limited access to WASH in Schools compromised children’s health, educational attainment and well-being, and exacerbated already existing inequities and challenges in each of the countries.

Gender was identified as a key aspect of inequity in all six countries, but the mechanisms and manifestations of gender inequities varied within each context. Menstruating girls in Malawi and Uganda faced consistent challenges in obtaining adequate access to WASH in Schools facilities, preventing them
from comfortably practising proper hygiene. In this context, a lack of access to school WASH facilities is a potential cause of increased drop-out rates. Girls in Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan were affected by the poor maintenance of facilities and lack of privacy, rather than by overall lack of basic access. In these settings, lack of doors and private latrine stalls, coupled with proximity to boys’ latrines, led to girls avoiding the use of school WASH facilities, which may have deleterious health effects.

Accessibility of WASH facilities for children with disabilities was identified as an issue in all countries. In Malawi and Uganda, concerted effort has been made to include school sanitation, water and hand-washing facilities appropriate for children with disabilities. The designs for facilities, however, were often found to inadequately address students’ needs, and hand-washing facilities remain largely inaccessible, compromising students’ health.

Sanitation as a business – the poor will have to wait

Malawian sanitation entrepreneur Martius using

Malawian sanitation entrepreneur Martius using “The Gulper” to empty a pit latrine. Photo: Water for People

Providing toilets to the poorest may be “dear to the hearts of many non-profits, aid agencies and governments” but if you want to involve business you have to start with the better-off families first. So says business woman and sanitation entrepreneur Towera Jalakari who runs a pit emptying service in Blantyre, Malawi.

“We will get to Everyone in Blantyre one day, but the only way to make sure Blantyre actually solves its sanitation problems is to recognize that the market must function.  […]  As we get better, as we scale city-wide, then costs will come down, services will improve, and pressure will build for all people to have a toilet.  We will get to the poorest, but they are not our first targets.  […] If we rush too fast […] then the poor will not have lasting services but rather a lot of useless toilets and nowhere to go to the bathroom.”

Malawi is one the countries in Water for People’s Sanitation as a Business program (2010-2014), which is funded by a US$ 5.6 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Water for People has contracted Tools for Enterprise & Education Consultants (TEECs) to support pit emptying businesses in Lilongwe and Blantyre.

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Why Mr Khombe is building ecosan latrines for his neighbours

The poor villagers of Kaniche in Malawi can’t afford to buy fertilizer. That’s why villager elder, Chair of the Village Development Committee, local headman and community mason Mr. Khombe has built 30 ecosan latrines for his neighbours.

Mr. Khombe features in WaterAid’s latest fund raising appeal The Big Dig. The goal is to bring safe water to 134,000 poor people in rural Malawi.

WaterAid field officers Michael Kalane and Nathan Chiwoko are posting live reports from the project area using smartphones and Instagram.

The UK Government, through its UK Aid Match initiative, will double all donations the public gives before 18 September 2012.

School menstrual hygiene management in Malawi: more than toilets

School menstrual hygiene management in Malawi: more than toilets, 2012.

SHARE; WaterAid

This study identifies the needs and experiences of girls regarding menstruation. It draws upon participatory group workshops, a questionnaire and semi structured interviews with school-age girls in Malawi to make various recommendations, including lessons about menstrual hygiene management (MHM), girl-friendly toilet designs, and the provision of suitable and cheap sanitary protection.

Seminar – Helping entrepreneurs provide sustainable sanitation services

Small private providers, from retailers to masons, from public toilet operators to latrine emptying businesses, are of vital importance to medium- and lower-income communities, according to BPD Water & Sanitation [1]. The sanitation sector needs to capitalise on the growing interest in social entrepreneurship and the ‘bottom of the pyramid’ especially in urban areas.

There are numerous resilient private sanitation providers but the majority get limited support or oversight from public bodies, NGOs and others. Changing this requires requires relatively little effort, contends BPD, and would reap many economic, health and environmental benefits.

At the World Water Week in Stockholm, BPD, the Stockholm Environment Institute and WASTE are organising a seminar on “Helping Entrepreneurs Provide Sustainable Sanitation Services” (24 August 2011, 14.00 – 17.00, Room T6). The seminar explores the different markets and incentives for sanitation entrepreneurs from Bolivia, Ghana and Malawi. In discussion with entrepreneurs and organisations/ specialists that support them, this interactive session will engage participants in debate around two key topics: finance and business support. The session will finish with an interactive ‘sanitation marketplace’.

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Malawi Signs First Global Sanitation Fund Sub-Grantee Contracts

The WSSCC Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) programme in Malawi continues to move forward strongly with the signing of sub-grantees following the first funding round.  The agreements that have been entered into are for between 2 and 4 years, and total nearly USD 2 million (38% of the total GSF grant).

The following four organizations and one consortium were selected for funding:­

  • Canadian Physicians for Aid and Relief­
  • Centre for Integrated Community Development ­
  • Concern Universal ­
  • Training Support for Partners­
  • Water for People Malawi, Fresh Water and CCAP Synod of Livingstonia Development Department (Consortium)

These organizations will work across all 6 of the GSF’s focus districts: Chikhwawa, Balaka, Nkhotakota, Ntchisi, Phalombe, and Rumphi.  Two of the grants are focused in two districts and the other three in just one district.   The GSF programme design in Malawi emphasizes collaborative working modalities at the District level, in order to better coordinate interventions and leverage skills and resources.  As a result, GSF’s sub-grantees will be working closely to support the plans and contribute towards the sanitation and hygiene targets of Local Government bodies, as well as engage with other development partners at the district level to enhance synergies.

Plan Malawi, GSF’s Executing Agency, will support these organizations commence their work on the ground.  In the coming months, Plan Malawi will also be putting out a further Request for Proposals to look for additional sub-grantees to complement the initial grants and contribute further towards the objectives and targets of the GSF programme in Malawi.

For more information, visit http://www.wsscc.org/resources/resource-news-archive/malawi-signs-first-global-sanitation-fund-sub-grantee-contracts

Malawi/Tanzania : US partnership to bring clean water to 30 schools

The Water and Sanitation Rotarian Action Group (WASRAG) announced a partnership to bring 5 million gallons [19 million litres] of clean water, along with sanitation and hygiene education, to 30 schools in Malawi and Tanzania during its fourth World Water Summit on 20 May 2011. The other members of the partnership are Africare, Procter and Gamble, and H2O for Life.

Africare will implement the project, Procter and Gamble will provide PUR water purification packets through its Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program, and H2O for Life will connect schoolchildren in North America with those in Malawi and Tanzania to educate them about the water crisis. Rotary clubs and districts will donate to the project and use their community connections to help find schools to participate.

WASRAG web logo

WASRAG estimates that the water treatment will cost US$ 20,000 per school. Rotary clubs and districts will provide about a sixth of the funding.

The group announced several other partnerships during its summit, including an alliance with Chevron to develop a technology demonstration centre in Niger and an agreement with car wash owners in Atlanta, Georgia, who plan to contribute a portion of the cost of every car wash to water projects. WASRAG is also working with Jamie Bartram, director of the Water Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, to develop monitoring protocols for its projects.

Related web sites:

Source: Diana Schoberg, Rotary International News, 22 May 2011