Tag Archives: menstrual hygiene

Kenya is promising free sanitary napkins to help keep girls in school

Kenya is promising free sanitary napkins to help keep girls in school. Quartz, June 2017.

Kenya’s president has promised to give all school girls free sanitary napkins. Less than two months before Kenyans go to the polls, president Uhuru Kenyatta signed the Basic Education Amendment Act which compels the government to provide “free, sufficient and quality sanitary towels to every girl child registered and enrolled in a public basic education institution.”

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School for everyone. (Reuters/Thomas Mukoya)

One in 10 girls on the continent misses school during her period, according the United Nations education agency. In Kenya, one of the biggest obstacles for girls attending schools is a lack of sanitary napkins, often too expensive for families to afford. Kenya’s ministry of education estimates that girls who stay home while they are menstruating lose six weeks of schooling a year.

Read the complete article.

Using Waste Cloth and Towels, 4 Rajkot Schoolkids Created Reusable Sanitary Pads for Women

Using Waste Cloth and Towels, 4 Rajkot Schoolkids Created Reusable Sanitary Pads for Women. The Better India, May 24, 2017.

To shatter taboos surrounding periods and promote menstrual hygiene, a group of friends in Rajkot designed an affordable DIY pad using waste cloth and taught women in nearby slums and villages how to make them. The project won the Disney Innovation Award in the ‘Large Impact’ category at the ‘I CAN Awards 2014’ organised by Design for Change. 

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Waste cloth and towels collected through a donation rally.

A group of boys and girls at the Galaxy School in Rajkot, Gujarat realised that, even within their close circle, they were uncomfortable discussing the topic of periods openly.

On probing this deep-seated issue, they stumbled across a report by AC Nielsen stating that a mere 12 % of Indian women use pads, while an overwhelming 88 % use unhygienic materials like ash, sand, and husk during their menstruation.

Poor menstrual hygiene leads to the spread of infections and risk of cervical cancer, with 70 % of reproductive diseases in India originating from this. This worrying situation bothered the students.

Digging deeper to understand why this is such an issue, the students spoke to 70 women in their community and discovered that many cannot afford to buy pads at all.

Read the complete article.

In Nepal, women are still banished to ‘menstrual huts’ during their periods. It’s time to end this dangerous tradition

In Nepal, women are still banished to ‘menstrual huts’ during their periods. It’s time to end this dangerous tradition. Independent, May 24, 2017.

After seeing the practice of seclusion and the plight of these women, I believe that taboos around periods are not a cultural issue, they are a human rights issue 

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An example of a menstrual hut in remote areas of Nepal (Anjana Saud/Tatapani)

As a journalist and development professional living and working in Katmandu, I have had the chance to see menstruating women’s situation across Nepal from close quarters.

I found that the practice of isolating women during their period exists across the country in differing forms. The situation of women living at the rural areas is terrible.

In some places, women cannot be in their own homes during their period; in others women can be in the house, but not in the kitchen and worship room.

They are also forbidden from touching other people (especially male members of the family or neighbours) or cattle and from growing fruit and vegetables.

Read the complete article.

PMA2020 Menstrual Hygiene Management Briefs

PMA2020 Menstrual Hygiene Management Briefs

PMA2020 MHM Briefs are a one-page snapshot of select MHM indicators. PMA2020-horizontal-web-tagline

PMA2020 looks at how menstrual hygiene is managed across age groups and across wealth categories, including the types of materials used to collect menstrual blood, the main environments where MHM is practiced, and the safety, privacy, and cleanliness of these environments, among other metrics.

Briefs are available on Ghana, Kenya, Indonesia and other countries on the PMA2020 website.

FRESH webinar: Menstrual Hygiene Management in Emergencies

Menstrual Hygiene Management in Emergencies – Global guidelines and lessons learned from the Philippines

Presenters: Marni Sommer, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Jon Michael Villasenor, UNICEF Philippines
Time: 17 May 2017

Marni Sommer discussed the soon to be published Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in Emergencies Toolkit, developed by Columbia University and the International Rescue Committee in partnership with the global humanitarian response community.

Jon Villasenor’s presentation was on the MHM response to the typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines in 2014, where he will be discussing the actions taken in the immediate aftermath and over the longer recovery period.

 

What Kenya Can Teach The U.S. About Menstrual Pads

What Kenya Can Teach The U.S. About Menstrual Pads | Source: NPR, May 10, 2016 |

The United States is only just starting to get periods — or, at least, acknowledging that products for “that time of the month” aren’t optional for menstruating women.

In 40 states, plus the District of Columbia, pads and tampons are subject to sales tax. Earlier this year, when President Obama was asked why they haven’t been exempted like other necessities, he said, “I suspect it’s because men were making the laws when those taxes were passed.”

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Faith Wanjoki of ZanaAfrica gives a lesson on how to use a sanitary pad in a classroom in Kisumu, Kenya. Her colleague, Catherine Onyango, sits by her side. ZanaAfrica Foundation

But there’s a movement to fight these taxes, and several states have eliminated them. Next up: New York, which has just passed a bill that’s awaiting Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s signature.

Meanwhile, one country is way ahead of the U.S. when it comes to understanding that pads and tampons shouldn’t be taxed.

It’s Kenya.

Kenya repealed its value added tax on pads and tampons back in 2004 to lower the price consumers pay. And since 2011, the Kenyan government has been budgeting about $3 million per year to distribute free sanitary pads in schools in low-income communities.

That’s not to say Kenya is an ideal place to get one’s period. Many Kenyan girls still don’t have access to sanitary products, so they use unhygienic materials like chicken feathers, cheap mattresses and newspapers to fashion makeshift pads, says Megan White Mukuria.

Mukuria is the founder of ZanaAfrica Foundation, which delivers health education — and sanitary pads — to help girls stay in school. A girl who is embarrassed to stain her uniform (or has an infection) is one who is likely to skip class and eventually drop out, Mukuria explains. UNESCO estimates that more than two million Kenyan girls need support in order to get menstrual hygiene products.

Read the complete article.

SHARE – A New Training Guide on Menstrual Hygiene Management

SHARE – A New Training Guide on Menstrual Hygiene Management, 2015. | Source: SHARE website, April 13, 2015 |

An informative, new training guide which seeks to assist practitioners in integrating menstrual hygiene management (MHM) into their work and programmes has just been published by SHARE and WaterAidMHM-Training-Guide

SHARE and MHM
SHARE has long been endeavouring to address the research gaps relating to MHM. In 2012 we published the Menstrual Hygiene Matters manual which features examples of good MHM practice and offers guidance on building competence and confidence to break the silence surrounding the issue, and in 2013 we supported a systematic review exploring the health and social effects of MHM.

Developed by WaterAid, this new training guide is our latest contribution to building the knowledge base around MHM and raising awareness of the issue globally. It builds on the Menstrual Hygiene Matters manual and presents a range of plans, handouts, presentations and films that a facilitator could use when facilitating sessions or workshops on MHM amongst development practitioners. These interactive plans and accompanying resources explore the key issues and components of MHM programmes and can be adapted depending on the context, participants and time available.

The guide in action
The training guide and its various components were tested by WaterAid in its country programmes, with local staff and (I)NGOs, and at international training forums and conferences such as the 2014 Brisbane WASH Conference.

We hope that it will be an invaluable tool to those wishing to integrate MHM into their development programming.

If you use the training the guide or the resource book to complement your programming, we’d love to hear from you. Please get in touch to tell us what you thought: contactshare@lshtm.ac.uk

Next steps
Download the Training Guide
• View the Menstrual Hygiene Matters manual
• Check out the training tools in action at Brisbane
• Read the systematic review
• Find out more about our work on MHM

Tackling the Taboo of Menstruation

In connection with last week’s WSSCC-UN Women side event on the Commission on the Status of Women, WSSCC Executive Director published a new blog on the Huffington Post. It begins:

“In 1995, global rights activists sent a powerful message about the urgent need for gender equality in political, civic, economic, cultural and social life. Two decades later, women and girls have made powerful strides in closing the gender gap.”

Read the full article at:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/chris-w-williams/tackling-the-taboo-of-men_b_6866158.html

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Yes, hygiene and school enrolment are directly proportional

In Bangladesh, the lack of separate latrines for girls and menstrual hygiene facilities in secondary schools are major factors in the disproportionate rate of absence and dropout of adolescent girls.

Sabrina Shaidullah Sabrina Shahidullah

A study undertaken in Bangladesh revealed an 11 per cent increase in girls’ enrolment mainly due to the provision of sanitary toilets.” –Technical paper series/IRC

In Bangladesh the standard number of toilets in schools has been set as a minimum of one toilet for every 60 students. However, this is far from being achieved. The infographic below shows that on average, schools in Bangladesh have half the number of toilets required. However, although 94 per cent of schools have latrines within the compound, a large number remain unusable because they are dirty or broken.

BRAC WASH School Sanitation graph

Source: UNICEF WASH for school children South Asia Report, 2012

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SCA and WSSCC partner to break silence around menstruation

Geneva, 17 November 2014 – SCA, a leading global hygiene and forest products company, and the Geneva-based Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), the only United Nations body devoted solely to the sanitation and hygiene needs of vulnerable and marginalized people, have today entered into an innovative new partnership to break the silence around menstruation for women and girls around the world. SCA and WSSCC will jointly work to educate on menstrual issues and the importance of good hygiene.

The parties announced the partnership in Cape Town, South Africa, in connection with Team SCA’s first stop-over in the Volvo Ocean Race round the world competition. During the Cape Town stop-over, Team SCA attended a menstrual hygiene workshop with girls and women from the townships of Khayelitsha and Gugaletu, where experts from WSSCC, the Volunteer Centre (a Cape Town NGO), and SCA led a training session and discussion of the challenges the women face in managing their periods.

The partnership will include actions during, and between, the race stopovers until June 2015. These include Brazil (Itajai), China (Sanya), New Zealand (Auckland), Portugal (Lisbon), South Africa (Cape Town), Sweden (Gothenburg), The Netherlands (The Hague), United Arab Emirates (Abu Dhabi) and the USA (Newport).

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