Tag Archives: SDGs

Wastewater as a Resource Leaders Forum, 15 November 2017

As part of the IWA Water and Development Congress & Exhibition in Buenos Aires, there will be a special, invitation-only,  Leadership Forum on wastewater reuse:

Wastewater Management and Reuse to build Water Wise Cities: Innovative Solutions for Engagement, Planning and Investment, 15 November 2017

Co-organised with World Bank, CAF and IFC

The Forum will take place in three sessions that will lead to the development of a framework to be carried forward and presented at the World Water Forum in Brazil in 2018.

The three sessions are on:

  • The wastewater challenge and reuse opportunity
  • Unlocking barriers and enabling reuse and recovery – innovative solutions/cases
  • A vision and roadmap for wastewater management and reuse to 2030

Learn more and invitation

 

Don’t think of treatment plants: building factories to meet the sanitation SDGs

Rwanda  - Pivot fecal sludge treatment 1

Pivot Works factory in Kigali, Rwanda. From left to right: Fecal sludge receiving tank, flocculation tanks, mechanical dewatering machine. Photo: Ashley Muspratt

4,900 days from now, in 2030, the Sustainable Development Goals will expire.  If that feels like a long time, consider the work ahead.  And by work, I dare not attempt to wrap my head around all 17 goals; I refer specifically to the WASH goal – SDG #6 – and even more specifically to the sanitation targets.

From my admittedly invested perch – I run a sanitation company – the most exciting thing about transitioning from the MDGs to the SDGs is the belated inclusion of treatment.  There’s finally recognition that “improved sanitation” without treatment is not improved sanitation.  The WASH community’s new mandate: “halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally” (SDG 6.3).  But consider that the urban population still requiring “safely managed sanitation” today stands at 3.214 billion [1]. Serving them entails expanding safe management, i.e., some form of treatment, to 625,000 people each day for the next 4,900 days.  That’s basically a city a day.

How can we achieve such a massive expansion of safe fecal sludge and wastewater management?  For starters, let’s stop building treatment plants. Heresy? There’s a better way.

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SDG 6 on water and sanitation is essential for sustainable development

SDG 6 on water and sanitation is essential for sustainable development

A third of people in low-income countries struggle to access clean water.

Water and sanitation linked to many development factors
Despite halving the number of people worldwide without access to an improved water source over the past 25 years, the poorest countries are struggling to provide safe water and adequate sanitation to all their citizens in a sustainable manner. Just over a quarter of people in low-income countries had access to an improved sanitation facility, compared with just over half in lower middle-income countries in 2015. Delivery of water supply and sanitation is no longer just a challenge of service provision, but it is intrinsically linked with climate change, water resources management, water scarcity and water quality.

Access to safe water and adequate sanitation is a basic human right and underpins success in development areas such as agriculture, energy, disaster resilience, human heath, the environment, and ultimately economic growth. In many countries, economic and population growth, as well as urbanization, have increased water demand while supply has remained unchanged or even decreased due to climate change.

Sustainable Development Goal 6 recognizes that sustainably managing water goes beyond simply providing a safe water supply and sanitation (targets 6.1 and 6.2) to address the broader water context, such as water quality and wastewater management, water scarcity and use efficiency, water resources management, and the protection and restoration of water-related ecosystems.

Read the complete article – World Bank Blog, June 3, 2016

The SDGs at city level: Mumbai’s example

The SDGs at city level: Mumbai’s example, 2016. Authors: Paula Lucci and Alainna Lynch. Overseas Development Institute.

How countries manage urbanisation over the next 15 years will define governments’ ability to achieve most of the Sustainable Development Goals.

  • Our analysis of performance over time (1998–2006) for three SDG targets in Mumbai (at city and slum settlement levels) suggests the target on access to water will be easier to achieve than the sanitation and housing targets.
  • However, data limitations at subnational level make it difficult to reach definite conclusions on trends over time, let alone to project performance through 2030 for
    these and other targets.
  • The SDGs provide an opportunity to set up-to-date credible baselines for cities and slums and to make historical data (where they exist) more accessible, for instance through user-friendly online portals. Having such data would highlight areas where progress needs to be accelerated or trends reversed, motivating city governments and campaigners to act.

The Sustainable Development Goals Explained: Clean Water and Sanitation

Published on Sep 17, 2015

United Nations – What makes it so difficult for some people to have access to water? Why are there millions of people in the world without access to a toilet? Does this issue only affect developing countries? Water and Sanitation Expert Leanne Burney from UN DESA answers all these questions on Goal #6.

Find out more about water and sanitation at http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopm….

For a list of all the goals see: http://ow.ly/Sj391

 

Campaigning for better WASH in health care facilities

WHO is launching a global plan of action to improve access to WASH at all health care facilities. This kind of intersectoral collaboration is set to become a major theme in the post-2015 development agenda.

Maternity ward, Gazipur, Bangladesh

Maternity ward, Gazipur, Bangladesh. © DFATD-MAECD/Wendell Phillips. https://www.flickr.com/photos/dfait-maeci/10057359875

Better access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in health care facilities is crucial for mothers and babies to stay healthy. It is just as important as curative measures says Dr Maria Neira, the Director of Public Health and Environment at the World Health Organization (WHO) [1]. She announced that WHO will launch a global plan of action by March 2015 on improving access to WASH at all health care facilities [2].

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