Tag Archives: wastewater reuse

UNEP launches awareness raising video on wastewater and oceans

A new short video “Wastewater: A widespread threat and missed resource” highlights the impacts of wastewater on coastal communities and ecosystems, and the benefits of improving its management. It is part of a series of ocean awareness videos titled Two Minutes on Oceans with Jim Toomey,  a collaboration between the popular American cartoonist Toomey and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

Related web site:  UNEP/GPA Global Wastewater Initiative (GW2I) – unep.org/gpa/gwi/gwi.asp

Read more: UNEP Launches Wastewater Video in the Series Two Minutes on Oceans with Jim Toomey, UNEP, 9 Dec 2014

– See more at: http://www.unep.org/newscentre/Default.aspx?DocumentID=2814&ArticleID=11102&l=en#sthash.UiDPanv0.dpuf

Effluent and Waste Water Management Conference, Nairobi, Kenya, 22-23 November 2011

This conference assesses recent developments and approaches to industrial wastewater management in the African region.There are speakers from UN agencies (Wold Bank, UNEP), universities, industry and government.

The conference is being organised by  Aidem Business Solution (ABS) and is sponsored by the Kenyan National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) and Cuss Environmental System Technology and Service GmbH.

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Safe use of wastewater in agriculture offers multiple benefits

Recycling urban wastewater and using it to grow food crops can help mitigate water scarcity problems and reduce water pollution, but the practice is not being as widely implemented as it should, according to a new UN food and agriculture organization (FAO) report [1]. The FAO has called for governments to increase the amount of treated wastewater being used for irrigation purposes as this will reduce costs for farmers and cities and improved water quality.

FAO report coverThe FAO report used case studies from Spain and Mexico to test methodologies for cost-benefit and cost-effective analyses of wastewater reuse projects. The Mexico case studies were drawn from three regions:

  • Mexico City & Tula Valley
  • Guanajuato City & La Purísima irrigation module
  • Durango City & Guadalupe Victoria irrigation module

“The case studies in this report show that safely harnessing wastewater for food production can offer a way to mitigate competition between cities and agriculture for water in regions of growing water scarcity,” said Pasquale Steduto, Deputy Director of FAO’s Land and Water Division. “In the right settings, it can also help to deal with urban wastewater effluent and downstream pollution.”

[1] Winpenny, J. … [et al.] (2010). The wealth of waste : the economics of wastewater use in agriculture. (FAO water reports ; 35). Rome, Italy, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). xv, 129 p. Download full report

See also: Mexico: farmers fear loss of “free fertilizer” when wastewater treatment plant is built, Sanitation Updates, 02 Aug 2010

Source: FAO, 06 Sep 2010

Japan: selling sewage to Australia

Japan has an unlikely new export product:  the sewage it normally dumps into rivers or the sea. The first buyer is the Australian mining industry. Could this also become a new money earner for developing countries? Well, no. The “export quality” sewage in question is effluent from high-tech Japanese wastewater treatment plants.

An innovative trade experiment will take place in the autumn of 2010. Australian ships with iron ore for Japan, will return, not with seawater in their ballast tanks, but with highly treated sewage water.

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Vacancy: Post Doctoral Fellow Microeconomics of Sanitation and Wastewater Reuse in Agriculture, IWMI, Ghana (with some travel) [deadline 30 September]

If you have recently completed your PhD in economics or sanitation but have sound understanding of both, then this could be just the assignment for you. The International Water Management Institute (IWMI) seeks the right person to analyze problems relating to human waste, as used in agriculture, then form policy recommendations to enhance livelihoods in the rural/urban interface.

Requirements include:

  • A recent PhD in agricultural or natural resources or environmental economics or environmental or civil engineering and
  • A good understanding of agriculture and microeconomics
  • Knowledge of sanitation challenges in developing countries: solid waste, fecal sludge and wastewater management (with on-site sanitation systems)
  • Excellent written and spoken English

Read the full job description and application details

Online application form

Complete Application Form + attach résumé + attach letter which addresses IWMI’s requirements listed in job description with names and email addresses of 3 professional referees, to be contacted if you are short-listed

Contact: work-at-iwmi@cgiar.org

Application deadline: 30 September 2010

Please do send requests for information or applications to Sanitation Updares

Mexico: farmers fear loss of “free fertilizer” when wastewater treatment plant is built

For over 100 years farmers in Hidalgo State use “the black waters” (wastewater) from Mexico City to irrigate their land.

So when word got out that the government was finally going to build a giant wastewater treatment plant, one might have expected the farmers around here to be excited. Instead, they were suspicious.

“Without that water, there is no life, “ said Gregorio Cruz Alamilla, 60, who has worked his family’s 12-acre farm since he was a boy.

Mr. Cruz knows the water is loaded with toxic substances, including chemicals dumped by factories, and he tires of clearing his field of plastic bottles and wrappings every time he irrigates.

But like many others here, he worries that treating the water, though it may remove harmful contaminants, will also strip away some of the natural fertilizers that even the authorities here say have helped make this valley so productive. And despite the government’s assurances, the farmers here suspect the worst: that once the water is treated, it will be pumped back to Mexico City, leaving the farms dry.

Farmer using “the black waters” for irrigation in Mezquital Valley. Photo: Janet Jarman, New York Times. Janet Jarman, New : :

Wastewater reuse for irrigation is common throughout the developing world, but nowhere on the scale of Mezquital Valley with its 350 square miles (906 square kilometres) of irrigated fields.

But now, Mexico City (pop. 20 million) is building a stormwater drainage system and treatment plant to deal with the growing problem of flooding during the rainy season.

“It was a predictable problem, but we never paid enough attention to it,” said Ernesto E. Espino de la O, who manages the treatment and water supply project for the National Water Commission. A collapse of the crumbling system, warned one study from Mexico’s National Autonomous University of Mexico, would be catastrophic, flooding large parts of the city.

Engineers have started to construct a 38.5-mile (62 km) drainage tunnel that will transport stormwater to the town of Atotonilco, where a wastewater treatment is plant is planned.

The plant, which is budgeted to cost $1 billion and will begin operating in 2012, will clean 60 percent of the city’s wastewater. The water commission’s measurements show that the water is laced with heavy metals like lead and arsenic, filled with high levels of pathogens and parasites, and weighed down by grease.

But the farmers “are worried that the treatment plant will take out the nutrients, that the water will go back to Mexico City and that it will be privatized,” said Filemón Rodríguez Castillo, the director of the main irrigation district here. “The water is very much appreciated here, independent of the fact that it smells so ugly, that it stinks.”

One of his jobs is to persuade local residents that even though the residents of Mexico City will have to pay to have their water treated, they will not get it back.

The main benefit of irrigating with clean water, he has told them, is that they will be able to grow many kinds of vegetables, which are now restricted to protect consumers from illness.

Officials here now direct farmers not to grow crops in which the edible part comes into contact with the irrigation water and is eaten raw, ruling out vegetables like lettuce, carrots or beets. Alfalfa is permitted because it is used as animal feed. But enforcement is spotty and the farmers abide by an elastic interpretation of the regulations, planting broccoli and cauliflower, for example.

To the farmers here, whose sturdy opinions match their surprisingly good health, the proof that their water is good is in what they see around them. “Plants won’t absorb poison; they would die,” said Jesús Aldana Ángeles, a 75-year-old fifth-generation farmer, who was watching his small flock of sheep munch on the remains of his harvested alfalfa field. “There is no better laboratory than the ground. The earth absorbs everything. It purifies it, it treats it.”

Read more about wastewater irrigation read “Wastewater irrigation and health : assessing and mitigating risk in low-income countries”.

Related web site: WHO – Safe use of wastewater, excreta and greywater

Source: Elisabeth Malkin, New York Times, 04 May 2010

Research project on safe wastewater reuse for urban poor concludes

The WHO/IDRC/FAO research project on non-treatment options for safe wastewater use in poor urban communities was concluded on 30 April 2010. The report of the final workshop in Amman, Jordan (7-10 March 2010) has now been published.

The objective of the project was to test the applicability of the third edition of the WHO Guidelines for the Safe Use of Wastewater, Excreta and Greywater in Agriculture and Aquaculture (WHO, 2006). For this purpose the following four field studies were conducted:

  • Ghana Kumasi: Evaluation of non-treatment options for maximizing public health benefits of WHO guidelines governing the use of wastewater in urban vegetable production in Ghana.
  • Ghana/Tamale: Minimizing health risks from using excreta and grey water by poor urban and peri-urban farmers in the Tamale municipality, Ghana.
  • Jordan: Safe use of greywater for agriculture in Jerash Refugee Camp: focus on technical, institutional and managerial aspects of non-treatment options.
  • Senegal: Proposition d’étude en vue de l’intégration et de l’application des normes de la réutilization des eaux usées et excréta dans l’agriculture.

The research team is now working on the final product, a Guidance Document/Manual for Sanitation Safety Plans to assist national and municipal authorities and other users of the WHO guidelines in their application.

During the 2010 Stockholm Water Week, WHO will launch the second edition of the information kit for the WHO safe use of wastewater guidelines (Sunday 5 September 17:45-18:45).

Project documents and the 2006 WHO guidelines are available on the WHO web page on Safe use of wastewater, excreta and greywater.