Tag Archives: wastewater reuse

Positive Progress: 3 Trends in Wastewater Treatment

Positive Progress: 3 Trends in Wastewater Treatment |Source: Ralph Exton, Triple Pundit, July 5 2016 |

Water has become one of the foremost challenges affecting the world today. In developing countries, millions of people lack access to clean, safe water. Weather extremes, such as drought are creating dangerous situations; meanwhile, a new released report predicts that by year 2060, more than a billion people worldwide will live in cities at risk of major flooding as a result of climate change. drops-of-water-578897_1280-1

Then there’s the rapid population growth and economic development in regions, such as the Middle East, where water resources are being pushed well beyond natural limits. And as cities’ aging piping and distribution infrastructure continues to crumble, trillions of gallons of water are lost.

Municipalities in particular are taking the brunt of these challenges. Yet, I believe some of the greatest opportunities for solving the problems exist within their wastewater treatment plants. Last month, leaders in the global water sector convened in Munich, Germany, for the 50th anniversary of IFAT – an influential conference for innovation in water, sewage, waste and raw materials management. Three wastewater treatment trends – and solutions – dominated the discussion.

Read the complete article.

Startup Focused On Home Wastewater Reuse With ‘Biopipe’

Startup Focused On Home Wastewater Reuse With ‘Biopipe’ | Source: Water Online, April 21 2016 |

Should every home purify its own wastewater? A startup from young Turkish entrepreneurs says yes. 375_250-innovation_reg.png

Enes Kutluca, one of the founders, believes far too little wastewater is being reused. The global production of wastewater stands at about 165 billion cubic meters each day, and only about 2 percent gets recycled, according to Daily Sabah, an English-language daily newspaper published in Turkey.

“I think the wastewater treatment systems on the market have evolved in the wrong way,” Kutluca toldDaily Sabah. “There’s no sustainable wastewater treatment system that is suitable for everyone. People are thinking wastewater treatment is a luxury to have in homes.”

Kutluca observed that the sewer systems of modern cities are not efficient. For him, that was the starting point for innovation.

“We collect all wastewater from all houses with sewage networks, build kilometers of collection pipes and giant wastewater treatment plants. All of these cost millions of dollars and they don’t even use the treated water. We just let this usable water flow into seas and oceans. So, I started thinking that collecting wastewater from each house is not the best solution. What if I invent a wastewater treatment system that enables all houses to treat their own wastewater and reuse it again in their homes?” he said, per the report.

Enter Biopipe, a technology designed by Kutluca’s firm meant to solve this problem. Biopipe claims it is the world’s first and only sewage treatment pipe. How is works, as explained by Kutluca to Daily Sabah:

“Biopipe is the only innovative wastewater treatment system that does not produce sludge and it is patented in more than 55 countries. It is the result of years of research and development that has now become one of the most sustainable, eco-friendly and cost-effective wastewater treatment solutions in the world,” he said and added: “Today treatment systems on the market are complicated, expensive and not custom designed. Biopipe has a simple, innovative design, which is based around a natural treatment mechanism, and performed inside a pipe with the help of good bacteria without the need for any additional chemicals.”

Read the complete article.

UNEP launches awareness raising video on wastewater and oceans

A new short video “Wastewater: A widespread threat and missed resource” highlights the impacts of wastewater on coastal communities and ecosystems, and the benefits of improving its management. It is part of a series of ocean awareness videos titled Two Minutes on Oceans with Jim Toomey,  a collaboration between the popular American cartoonist Toomey and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

Related web site:  UNEP/GPA Global Wastewater Initiative (GW2I) – unep.org/gpa/gwi/gwi.asp

Read more: UNEP Launches Wastewater Video in the Series Two Minutes on Oceans with Jim Toomey, UNEP, 9 Dec 2014

– See more at: http://www.unep.org/newscentre/Default.aspx?DocumentID=2814&ArticleID=11102&l=en#sthash.UiDPanv0.dpuf

Effluent and Waste Water Management Conference, Nairobi, Kenya, 22-23 November 2011

This conference assesses recent developments and approaches to industrial wastewater management in the African region.There are speakers from UN agencies (Wold Bank, UNEP), universities, industry and government.

The conference is being organised by  Aidem Business Solution (ABS) and is sponsored by the Kenyan National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) and Cuss Environmental System Technology and Service GmbH.

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Safe use of wastewater in agriculture offers multiple benefits

Recycling urban wastewater and using it to grow food crops can help mitigate water scarcity problems and reduce water pollution, but the practice is not being as widely implemented as it should, according to a new UN food and agriculture organization (FAO) report [1]. The FAO has called for governments to increase the amount of treated wastewater being used for irrigation purposes as this will reduce costs for farmers and cities and improved water quality.

FAO report coverThe FAO report used case studies from Spain and Mexico to test methodologies for cost-benefit and cost-effective analyses of wastewater reuse projects. The Mexico case studies were drawn from three regions:

  • Mexico City & Tula Valley
  • Guanajuato City & La Purísima irrigation module
  • Durango City & Guadalupe Victoria irrigation module

“The case studies in this report show that safely harnessing wastewater for food production can offer a way to mitigate competition between cities and agriculture for water in regions of growing water scarcity,” said Pasquale Steduto, Deputy Director of FAO’s Land and Water Division. “In the right settings, it can also help to deal with urban wastewater effluent and downstream pollution.”

[1] Winpenny, J. … [et al.] (2010). The wealth of waste : the economics of wastewater use in agriculture. (FAO water reports ; 35). Rome, Italy, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). xv, 129 p. Download full report

See also: Mexico: farmers fear loss of “free fertilizer” when wastewater treatment plant is built, Sanitation Updates, 02 Aug 2010

Source: FAO, 06 Sep 2010

Japan: selling sewage to Australia

Japan has an unlikely new export product:  the sewage it normally dumps into rivers or the sea. The first buyer is the Australian mining industry. Could this also become a new money earner for developing countries? Well, no. The “export quality” sewage in question is effluent from high-tech Japanese wastewater treatment plants.

An innovative trade experiment will take place in the autumn of 2010. Australian ships with iron ore for Japan, will return, not with seawater in their ballast tanks, but with highly treated sewage water.

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Vacancy: Post Doctoral Fellow Microeconomics of Sanitation and Wastewater Reuse in Agriculture, IWMI, Ghana (with some travel) [deadline 30 September]

If you have recently completed your PhD in economics or sanitation but have sound understanding of both, then this could be just the assignment for you. The International Water Management Institute (IWMI) seeks the right person to analyze problems relating to human waste, as used in agriculture, then form policy recommendations to enhance livelihoods in the rural/urban interface.

Requirements include:

  • A recent PhD in agricultural or natural resources or environmental economics or environmental or civil engineering and
  • A good understanding of agriculture and microeconomics
  • Knowledge of sanitation challenges in developing countries: solid waste, fecal sludge and wastewater management (with on-site sanitation systems)
  • Excellent written and spoken English

Read the full job description and application details

Online application form

Complete Application Form + attach résumé + attach letter which addresses IWMI’s requirements listed in job description with names and email addresses of 3 professional referees, to be contacted if you are short-listed

Contact: work-at-iwmi@cgiar.org

Application deadline: 30 September 2010

Please do send requests for information or applications to Sanitation Updares