Tag Archives: WaterAid

Preventing violence linked to WASH: practitioners’ toolkit

WeCan Campaign poster used in an IDP camp in Batticoloa, Sri Lanka to help respond to and prevent violence against women

WeCan Campaign poster used in an IDP camp in Batticoloa, Sri Lanka to help respond to and prevent violence against women

Poorly designed and located water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions can increase people’s vulnerability to violence. This can range from sexual harassment when practicing open defecation or collecting water, to staff demanding sexual favours in exchange for access to WASH facilities.<

With this in mind, WaterAid/SHARE have published a toolkit  [1] to help practitioners make water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) safer for the most vulnerable.

The toolkit consists of briefing notes, a checklist of actions based on the ten key principles for reducing vulnerability to WASH-related violence, and a range of tools including case studies of good practice.  It is relevant for both humanitarian and development contexts. The materials also include videos, scenarios for training and tools for use with communities, key extracts from international human rights instruments and a folder of additional supporting information

Any actor working in humanitarian, development or transitional contexts can request free access to the materials by sending an email to gbv@wateraid.org.

[1] House, S., Ferron, S., Sommer, M. and Cavill, S. 2014. Violence, gender and WASH : a practitioner’s toolkit : making water, sanitation and hygiene safer through improved programming and services. London, UK, WaterAid/SHARE.

For more information:

  • House, S. et al., 2014. Violence, gender and WASH : a practitioner’s toolkit : making water, sanitation and hygiene safer through improved programming and services. Humanitarian exchange magazine, no. 60, February 2014. Available at: <http://washurl.net/5as6s3>
  • Violence and vulnerability: making WASH safe. Hygiene promotion in emergencies newsletter, no. 5, March 2014, Available at: <http://washurl.net/8k5b0a>
  • SHARE: Equity

In 2012 WaterAid America released “1 in 3“, a video highlighting the impact of the lack of sanitation on women.

Towards total sanitation workshop report – key findings

Cotonu Workshop Key Findings report

How can Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) and other programmatic approaches be  integrated into a service-led rural sanitation delivery? This was the topic that attracted  around 70 practitioners from 16 different countries  to Cotonu, Benin in November 2013 for a Learning and Exchange workshop  “Towards sustainable total sanitation”. The workshop was organised  by IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre in partnership with WaterAid, SNV and UNICEF.

The key findings of the workshop a presented in a new report, which is divided into four categories, covering the four conditions to trigger a service:

  • strengthening the enabling environment
  • demand creation and advocacy to change behaviour
  • strengthening the supply chain, and
  • appropriate incentives and financial arrangements.

Undoing inequity: water, sanitation and hygiene programmes that deliver for all

UK Under Secretary of State for International Development Lynne Featherstone visiting SHARE-funded Undoing Inequity programme in Uganda. Photo: SHARE/WaterAid

WaterAid is currently carrying out a SHARE-funded action research project in Zambia and Uganda in collaboration with WEDC and the Leonard Cheshire Disability and Inclusive Development Centre (LCD), called Undoing Inequity: water, sanitation and hygiene programmes that deliver for all.  The project aims to generate rigorous evidence about how a lack of safe water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) impacts on the lives of disabled, older persons and people living with a chronic illness; understand the barriers they face, develop and test an inclusive WASH approach to address those barriers and influence key policy and decision makers to mainstream inclusive WASH within development.

As part of this project, Hazel Jones (WEDC) has written a report titled Mainstreaming disability and ageing in water, sanitation and hygiene programmes.  This report recognises that progress on the MDGs is not happening in an equitable way.  A drive for increasing coverage of basic services, such as WASH has meant that people who are ‘harder to reach’, such as disabled and older people often remain un-served.

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This World Toilet Day sing #ThankYouToilet with WaterAid!

Join Louie the Loo to celebrate the little guy in the corner – your toilet! Did you know he’s a life-saver, and where toilets don’t exist, thousands die?

Extended call for abstracts: West Africa Workshop “Towards sustainable total sanitation”:

West Africa Learning and Exchange Workshop “Towards sustainable total sanitation”

Cotonou, Benin, 12-14 November 2013

Organised by: IRC, UNICEF, WaterAid and SNV

This workshop targets sanitation practitioners that have hands-on experience with the implementation of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programmes and projects and aims to bring together professionals working on rural sanitation in West Africa, particularly practitioners, researchers, policy makers, and people from government agencies, donors and media.

It will emphasise the role of CLTS, with a geographical focus on West Africa; the roles of hygiene/sanitation behaviour change and the enabling environment around CLTS and other sanitation improvement approaches.

The workshop will build on the sanitation life cycle framework as developed by IRC and also reflect on methodological experience from IRC’s past learning and sharing exchanges and workshops in the field of Sanitation & Hygiene.

The participation fee is free although participants must take care of their own travel and accommodation costs.

Abstract deadline extended to: 27 September 2013

Abstract form can be downloaded here

More information at: www.irc.nl/page/79226

Read the First Announcement and Call for Abstracts

Call for abstracts: West Africa Workshop “Towards sustainable total sanitation”:

West Africa Learning and Exchange Workshop “Towards sustainable total sanitation”

Cotonou, Benin, 12-14 November 2013

Organised by: IRC, UNICEF, WaterAid and SNV

This workshop targets sanitation practitioners that have hands-on experience with the implementation of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programmes and projects and aims to bring together professionals working on rural sanitation in West Africa, particularly practitioners, researchers, policy makers, and people from government agencies, donors and media.

It will emphasise the role of CLTS, with a geographical focus on West Africa; the roles of hygiene/sanitation behaviour change and the enabling environment around CLTS and other sanitation improvement approaches.

The workshop will build on the sanitation life cycle framework as developed by IRC and also reflect on methodological experience from IRC’s past learning and sharing exchanges and workshops in the field of Sanitation & Hygiene.

The participation fee is free although participants must take care of their own travel and accommodation costs.

Abstract deadline: 23 August 2013

More information at: www.irc.nl/page/79226

Read the First Announcement and Call for Abstracts

Community-Led Total Sanitation in East Asia and Pacific: Progress, Lessons and Directions

Community-Led Total Sanitation in East Asia and Pacific: Progress, Lessons and Directions, 2013CLTS-cover-resized

UNICEF, Plan, WaterAid and Water and Sanitation Program (WSP).

Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) is a community-wide behaviour change approach to stop open defecation which has been practiced by an estimated 100 million people in this region. Various organizations (i.e. Plan International, UNICEF, WaterAid, Water and Sanitation Program (WSP), Institute of Development Studies (IDS) and the CLTS Foundation, are supporting implementation across 12 countries in the East Asia and Pacific region; more then 50 UNICEF Country Offices across Asia, Africa and Latin America are now supporting implementation of Community Approaches to Total Sanitation.

The publication provides an up-to-date summary of CLTS status, lessons and experiences from the region, and highlights some of the key areas that require further attention and better quality uptake of CLTS at country level, and as such guide in accelerating efforts for reaching open defecation free (ODF) status and overall sanitation and hygiene improvements at scale.

May 8, 2013 Webinar – Removing Barriers to WASH by the RWSN equity and inclusion group

The RWSN equity and inclusion group is pleased to announce its latest webinar on Removing Barriers to WASH. If you would like to attend, please inform ShamilaJansz@wateraid.org. For more details, see below:  wateraid-logo

Description: WEDC and WaterAid have developed a new set of ‘Equity and Inclusion in WASH’ learning materials.

We have been collaborating to develop practical training materials for WASH practitioners, to help them analyse and address the problems faced by the most disadvantaged people in accessing WASH services. Extensively field-tested by WaterAid and WEDC in Africa and Asia, the materials are participatory and interactive, and are ideal to facilitate practical collaboration and problem-solving between disabled people and technical service providers. They can be used as stand-alone activities, or as part of a broader training programme. Although rooted in the social model of disability, the scope of the analysis framework has been broadened to encompass exclusion of all kinds. This makes the materials useful in building alliances with groups working on other issues, e.g. gender, HIV, ageing.

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WaterAid – Everyone, everywhere: A vision for water, sanitation and hygiene post-2015

Everyone, everywhere: A vision for water, sanitation and hygiene post-2015, 2013. WaterAid.

Everyone, everywhere: A vision for water, sanitation and hygiene post-2015, outlines WaterAid’s vision for water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in the post-2015 framework. Published on World Water Day 2013, it calls on UN member states to put WASH at the core of any future framework after the Millennium Development Goals expire. wateraid-logo

The report highlights the critical linkages between WASH and a broad range of human development goals – including health, education, gender equality, environmental sustainability and employment. It shows the positive impact that improvements in WASH has on these goals, and conversely how poor WASH holds back their progress.

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Transforming women’s lives: WaterAid video for International Women’s Day

“Men never come to collect water as it is a woman’s responsibility to provide water and prepare food”. Shanti Devi (35), Gopalpur Mushari, India

March 8th is International Women’s Day. WaterAid has launched a new promotional video “Transforming women’s lives” to highlight the impact their work has on women.

For more resources on women see WaterAid’s publications on Equity and Inclusion, the list of resources from the SHARE programme (search on women), the WSSCC thematic page on Gender and WASH and the latest publications on gender in the IRC WASH Library.