Tag Archives: World Toilet Day

Toilet takes up seat at the UN

At the first official UN celebration of World Toilet Day on 19 November 2013, a “mobile” toilet takes over the seat of Yemen at the UN headquarters in New York. Listen to the podcast of the UN Seminar and panel discussion entitled “Sanitation for All”  here.

Why World Toilet Day 2013 matters: unblocking constipated progress on sanitation

Why World Toilet Day 2013 matters: unblocking constipated progress on sanitation

Author: Julian Doczi, Research Officer – Water Policy, Overseas Development Institute (ODI), London, UK, j.doczi@odi.org.uk

A few months ago, the sanitation world received a welcome boost when the UN General Assembly officially recognised World Toilet Day. Founded in 2001 by popular sanitation advocate Jack Sim, and celebrated on November 19 each year, this Day aims to draw attention to the global sanitation crisis via the toilet, a topic which causes discomfort or giggles for many. Indeed, the Day has always had both a fun and serious side, with healthy doses of toilet humour running alongside the sobering headline that 2.5 billion people worldwide still lack access to improved sanitation. But its formal recognition this year is an important milestone, and one of several recent developments that could mark the beginning of a real sea change in political momentum toward the achievement of decent sanitation for all. wtdlogo

There is still a long way to go. Poor sanitation exacts a huge human burden and costs the global economy over US$260 billion per year, with health, education, personal security, human dignity, and the environment all affected. While sector specialists have long recognised these impacts, skewed heavily towards women and children, ministries and politicians have often preferred to look away.  In the first iteration of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2000, sanitation was ignored completely, and was included only as an afterthought in 2002. Afterthought or not though, the target – to reduce by half the proportion of people without sustainable access to  safe drinking water and basic sanitation by 2015 – has stimulated a healthier public and political debate, though progress is still slow. While the world has already met the drinking water target, it remains off-track for the sanitation target, with rural dwellers and the urban poor lagging most.

From the MDG target came further breakthroughs. The focus on water and sanitation in the 2006 Human Development Report was a timely reminder of the link between poor sanitation and poverty, and was followed by the UN General Assembly’s declaration of 2008 as the International Year of Sanitation. Evidence suggests that this event galvanised a new surge of activity on sanitation that has continued to this day. Rose George’s widely read book on sanitation, The Big Necessity, which looked at the many factors constraining sanitation progress, provides a useful reference point for assessing the level of progress over the last five years.

So what does this new surge of activity on sanitation look like, and who is championing the cause? Since 2008 we have seen:

  • Matt Damon, Bono, Richard Branson and many others going on a ‘toilet strike‘ for sanitation earlier this year
  • Unprecedented levels of investment in sanitation by donors like USAID (investing $1 billion USD in their new ‘Water and Development Strategy’ for 2013-2018), DFID (investing £104 million in their new ‘Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Results Programme’) and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (investing at least $250 million USD in water, sanitation and hygiene initiatives since 2010, including their ‘Reinvent the Toilet Challenge’)
  • Access to water and sanitation declared a fundamental human right by the UN General Assembly in 2010, affirmed by UN Human Rights Council, and now allowing citizens to legally demand these rights from their states
  • Strong likelihood of an independent and more holistic goal (not just a single target) on ‘water and sanitation for all‘ in the Sustainable Development Goals set to succeed the MDGs in 2015, driven by strong advocacy and clear global demand
  • The Sanitation and Water for All Partnership, established in 2010, consisting of high-level representatives from 44 developing country governments and a variety of development partners, meeting regularly to catalyse more political leadership and action on sanitation
  • Major national campaigns for sanitation in many off-track countries, such as the recent ‘Nirmal Bharat Yatra‘ in India: a sanitation awareness and behaviour change ‘travelling carnival’ that directly reached over 160,000 attendees last year

and now:

  • An official, UN-approved and permanent day for drawing attention to the sanitation crisis – World Toilet Day!

Have we now have reached a point of no return for sanitation? Big challenges remain, and the test will be progress on the ground, but the growing momentum can only be cause for optimism. World Toilet Day provides an opportunity for advocacy on sanitation at all levels, raising interest, helping to overcome shame and embarrassment, and stimulating investment. No longer is sanitation mainly an engineer’s domain either. The development community increasingly understands that the social and political incentives for sanitation decision making, among both politicians and citizens, are key to unblocking progress. This means that solutions are not straightforward, and points to new directions for engagement at the country level.

So congratulations to Jack Sim and all the other sanitation advocates as we take stock today, and remind ourselves of what still needs to be done. World Toilet Day is a clear sign that we’re moving in the right direction.

“Poo, Pee and be Happy” sculpture unveiled in Singapore for World Toilet Day

Mr. Toilet Jack Sim unveils sanitation sculpture in Singapore

Mr. Toilet Jack Sim unveils sanitation sculpture. Photo: Sunday Times, Singapore

A sculpture representing the World Toilet Day logo has been unveiled on Singapore’s Marina Barrage. Commissioned by the World Toilet Organization, the sculpture’s title “Evolution of Man: Poo Pee Happy” represents the evolution from cave man to civilised man, who enjoys clean sanitation.

World Toilet Day logo

World Toilet Day logo

The World Toilet Organization organised the unveiling ceremony together with PUB, Singapore’s water agency, and the Ministry of Environment and Water Resources (MEWR).

World Toilet Day is the brainchild of “Mr Toilet” Jack Sim, co-founder of the World Toilet Organization. Celebrated each year since 2001 on 19 November, the day has now been officially recognised by the United Nations. An interview with Jack Sim in the wake of World Toilet day was broadcast on Channel News Asia.

Related web site: World Toilet Day

Source: “Poo Pee Happy” sculpture to remind S’poreans of global sanitation crisis, Channel News Asia, 16 Nov 2013 ; Linette Lai, ‘Poo Pee Happy’ sculpture unveiled at Marina Barrage to commemorate World Toilet Day, Sunday Times, 16 Nov 2013

WASHplus Weekly: Focus on World Toilet Day 2013

World Toilet Day (WTD) is observed annually on November 19. The purpose of this international day is to break the taboo around toilets and draw attention to the global sanitation challenge. Resources in this issue include links to WTD events, a new WASHplus Briefing Note on fecal sludge management, 2013 blog posts and research reports on sanitation, and links to previous WASHplus Weeklies on sanitation issues.  weekly

WORLD TOILET DAY 2013 RESOURCES

  • Celebrate the Toilet (Link) - A virtual bathroom wall for commenting on World Toilet Day.
  • WaterAid – World Toilet Day 2013 – Louie the Loo Sings “Thank You Toilet” -(Video) Join Louie the Loo to celebrate the little guy in the corner—your toilet!
  • Splashdirect’s Guide to World Toilet Day - (Link) - Take part in the World Toilet Day blogging competition: Tell us your funniest or most disgusting bathroom story to win £250.
  • Splashdirect – World Toilet Day Infographic - (Link)
  • Water.org – World Toilet Day 2013 on Pinterest (Link)
  • Water and Sanitation Program – Infographic: What’s a Toilet Worth? (Link)
  • World Health Organization – World Toilet Day 2013 - (Link)

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Sanitation for All – UN resolution on World Toilet Day – it’s Official

wtd-resolution-final

Credit: UNICEF

The General Assembly has today passed a resolution [1] proposed by the Government of Singapore on Sanitation for All  and the establishment of November 19th as World Toilet Day. [2]

The amusement and laughter likely to follow the designation of 19 November as “World Toilet Day” would all be worthwhile if people’s attention was drawn to the fact that 2.5 billion people lacked proper sanitation and 1.1 billion were forced to defecate in the open, the General Assembly heard today. [3]

In a statement issued immediately following the Assembly’s action, UN Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson said that the new annual observance would “go a long way toward raising awareness about the need for all human beings to have access to sanitation”. [4]

The resolution builds on the Call to Action on Sanitation launched by Mr. Eliasson in March 2013 and to the General Assembly’s “Sustainable sanitation: the drive to 2015”, agreed in 2010.

Over 100 UN delegations are said to be co-sponsoring the “Sanitation for all” resolution  – including Bangladesh, Viet Nam, Jamaica and the United Kingdom [5].

Jack Sim, the Father of World Toilet Day. Credit: World Toilet Organization.

For updates follow @team_toilet and the hashtags #Toilets4All and #WorldToiletDay on Twitter.

World Toilet Day started off in 2001 as an initiative of the World Toilet Organization (WTO), founded by Jack Sim.

The UN General Assembly has requested UN-Water to facilitate the implementation of World Toilet Day in the context of Sanitation for All  [1]. 

Source:

[1] Sanitation for All. UN General Assembly A/67/L.75, 17 July 2013. Full text
[2] Therese Dooley, UNICEF, E-mail,  24 July 2013
[3] UN General Assembly GA/11397, 24 July 2013
[4] UN News, 24 July 2013
[5] UN adopts S’pore’s resolution on sanitation, ChannelNews Asia, 24 July 2013

Open defecation in white suburbia: WaterAid’s World Toilet Day video

A viral video showing a “woman risking her dignity and safety trying to find somewhere to go to the toilet in her neighbourhood” is at the centre of WaterAid’s 2012 World Toilet Day campaign.

1 in 3 women worldwide risk shame, disease, harassment and even attack because they have nowhere safe to go to the toilet. Sanitation would make 1.25 billion women’s lives safer and healthier

WaterAid ran their social media campaign called “#1in3women need your support”, asking governments to take action, on Thunderclap.

For more information go to the WaterAid website

WASHplus Weekly – Focus on World Toilet Day 2012

Issue 79 November  16, 2012 | Focus on World Toilet Day 2012

In 2001 the World Toilet Organization declared November the 19th as World Toilet Day (WTD). This year it will be celebrated in over 19 countries with over 51 events hosted by various water and sanitation advocates.  

This issue of the Weekly contains links to WTD 2012 resources as well as links to upcoming sanitation events and 2012 publications and videos by USAID, WaterAid, the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance and others.

#IGiveAShit, do you? – World Toilet Day 19 November

Last year, the World Toilet Day campaign reached 1 billion people, says World Toilet Organization (WTO) founder Jack Sim aka “Mr. Toilet”.  For this year’s campaign, WTO is partnering with the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC). The theme is “I give a shit, do you?”

World Toilet Day is an international day of action, initiated by WTO in 2001, to break the taboo around toilets and draw attention to the global sanitation challenge.

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WASHplus Weekly on Communal Sanitation

November 19th is World Toilet Day and this issue of the WASHplus Weekly contains links to World Toilet Day websites and recent studies and articles on communal sanitation issues. Communal or public sanitation is an important WASH issue, especially in high-density slums with a high proportion of tenants and/or frequent flooding and water-logging. The financing and sustainable management of communal/ public toilets is challenging. Please contact WASHplus if you have information to add to this or other topics for future issues of the Weekly. 

A luxury item? WaterAid releases World Toilet Day video

In the run up to World Toilet Day on 19 November, WaterAid has released a new short highlighting the global sanitation scandal.

Viewers who promote the film can join the “bog-roll of honour” by posting a message on the WaterAid web site.