Tag Archives: Global Waters

Open Defecation vs. Community Toilets: A Complicated Choice – Global Waters

Open Defecation vs. Community Toilets: A Complicated Choice. Global Waters, February 6, 2017.

She told us all to just forget it. I didn’t catch her name, I just watched her adjust the microphone and stand on tiptoes at the podium. Her grey hair peeked out from behind and she sounded frustrated.

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A poster showing good hand washing practices outside a community toilet in Delhi. Photo Credit: USAID/India

Forget the security. It won’t make a difference. Forget the caretakers and the cleaning supplies. We don’t need those. We just want sewer lines in our communities. That’s enough now. We want to use a toilet in our home.

The other women in the audience clearly agreed given the loud burst of applause when she mentioned sewer lines. Instead, she has a community toilet; that or the choice of squatting somewhere out in the open. Choosing between defecating in the open or using a community toilet is layered with far more complexities than I’d understood before.

My colleagues and I from USAID/India were spending the day at a workshop organized by our partner, Centre for Urban and Regional Excellence (CURE). They’re in the early stages of a behavior change communication study that will help us understand why, even with access to community toilets, open defecation is still happening. There were about 100 people living in five slums across Delhi who had given up their day to tell us.

Read the complete article.

USAID’s Global Waters – January 2017

USAID’s Global Waters, January 2017 issue. 

Contents

  • A Decade of Improving Lives and Conserving Ecosystems – One of USAID’s longest running public-private partnerships, the Water and Development Alliance with the Coca-Cola Company and its Foundations, successfully addresses global water challenges. globalwaters
  • The Impact of Strategic Water Programming – USAID Global Water Coordinator Christian Holmes reflects on six years of Agency water accomplishments, approaches, and learning.
  • Improving Water Supplies and Sanitation Services in East Africa – PREPARED works with Uganda’s main water utility to increase the resiliency of the country’s water and sanitation services, making it a model for its water-stressed neighbors
  • And more

USAID Announces Partnership with Toilet Board Coalition

USAID Announces Partnership with Toilet Board Coalition. Global Waters, November 2016.

Public-private partnerships have significant potential to accelerate progress toward the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals’ sanitation target. An exciting new Global Development Alliance between USAID and the Toilet Board Coalition promises to strengthen efforts to reach the 2.4 billion worldwide still without adequate sanitation. 

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A roadside toilet in the desert in Tunisia. According to the World Bank, 92 percent of Tunisians now have access to improved sanitation facilities, compared to just 73 percent in 1990. Photo Credit: Dennis Keller

To fuel continued global sanitation improvements and generate sustainable livelihood opportunities, USAID is proud to announce a three-year Global Development Alliance with the Toilet Board Coalition. Launched in 2014, the Toilet Board Coalition is a public-private partnership that brings together some of the world’s most dynamic companies, multilaterals, NGOs, and business minds. It serves as an accelerator to incubate and scale-up innovative technologies and services to help mitigate unmet need for improved sanitation across the developing world.

Read the complete article.

Global Waters, October 2016 – USAID

Below are links to articles in the October 2016 issue of USAID’s Global Waters: handwashing

USAID’s Global Waters, August 2016

The August 2016 issue of USAID’s Global Waters is now online and includes the articles listed below. usaid

Pipeline to Progress  – The recent opening of a major new USAID-funded water pipeline is pumping new life into area homes and businesses — carrying with it the promise of a more dependable water supply for 260,000 residents of the southern West Bank

West Africa Water Supply, Sanitation & Hygiene Program – Our Real Impact series takes an in-depth look at USAID’s WA-WASH program and its work in the West African countries of Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Niger.

Improving Water Services for a More Water Secure Middle East – Global Water Coordinator Christian Holmes reports on his Middle East visit and the work being done to meet regional water needs to both maintain public health and produce food.

Nader Al-Khateeb on West Bank Water Security – Al-Khateeb tells Global Waters Radio about the recent opening of the Deir Sha’ar pipeline in the southern West Bank and how it is improving water security for 260,000 residents.

Emily Rand on Improved Child Feces Management – Rand discusses key findings from recent research  produced by the World Bank and UNICEF in the growing public health field of child feces management.

Annabell Waititu on Gender and Water Management in Kenya – Waititu talks to Global Waters Radio about why it is important for women to become involved in water management decisions beyond the household.

USAID Joins 100,000 Women in India to Bring Dignity, Safety, and Health to a City of Two Million

USAID Joins 100,000 Women in India to Bring Dignity, Safety, and Health to a City of Two Million | Source: Christian Holmes/USAID, Global Waters, June 27, 2016 |

At USAID we recognize the threat poor sanitation combined with rapid urbanization presents to human health, dignity, and prosperity. This is why we have made urban sanitation a global priority for the Agency. During a recent visit to India, I was able to see some of the work being done to bring sanitation services to urban areas, and had the good fortune to meet some inspiring women who are advancing these efforts in their communities.

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USAID Global Water Coordinator Christian Holmes visits with young students at a Vizag municipal school. Children also have a role to play as change agents in ending open defecation in their communities. Their school is now the number one-ranked Swachh Bharat school in the entire city, and its students’ academic performance has improved considerably. Photo Credit: USAID/India

Currently, more than 300 million people live in India’s urban areas, a number that is quickly increasing. The growing population of city dwellers is straining the country’s ability to provide safe drinking water and sanitation services.

To address this, the Government of India has committed to providing sanitation and household toilet facilities for all 4,041 cities in India through Swachh Bharat (Clean India) Campaign.

India’s commitment to this effort is vital. Close to 600 million people in the country practice open defecation, which contaminates water and can spread diseases. Lack of access to sanitation can keep people from productive activities such as work and school, either due to illness or time spent searching for private, safe locations to defecate. In India, it is estimated this lack of access results in an annual economic loss of approximately $54 billion or 6.4 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product.

Read the complete article.

Global Waters Radio: Eddy Perez on Lessons Learned and New Trends in the Sanitation Sector

Global Waters Radio: Eddy Perez on Lessons Learned and New Trends in the Sanitation Sector | Global Waters, June 2016 |

Eddy Perez is a Professor of Practice in Sanitation at the Emory School of Public Health’s Center for Global Safe Water, Sanitation and Hygiene. eddy

In his recent conversation with Global Waters Radio, Perez talks about his career in the sanitation sector, shares lessons he has learned along the way, and explains why sanitation improvements in both rural and urban areas must remain a programming priority in international efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Perez discusses both the challenges and opportunities inherent in the global development community’s pursuit of SDG 6.2, which within 15 years aims to “achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation” — an enormous task.

Link to the podcast/complete article.