Tag Archives: Global Waters

Global Waters Radio: Establishing a Sustainable Market for Water Purification Tablets in Ghana

Global Waters Radio: Establishing a Sustainable Market for Water Purification Tablets in Ghana. Global Waters, July 18, 2017.

“We feed ourselves out of the sale of Aquatabs — so financially, Aquatabs has helped given us a very sustainable job, and we are proud of it.” 

Ernest Saka Ansong is managing director for Health Top Up Services, a private Ghanaian company that serves as Aquatabs’ official importer. Photo Credit: Health Top Up Services

Ernest Saka Ansong is managing director for Health Top Up Services, a private Ghanaian company that serves as Aquatabs’ official importer. Photo Credit: Health Top Up Services

Aquatabs are one of the world’s most popular water purification tablets, produced by Medentech, a company specializing in manufacture of disinfection products.

Through partners, more than 11 billion liters of water were treated with Aquatabs worldwide in 2016.

First introduced to the Ghanaian market roughly 10 years ago by the USAID Ghana Sustainable Change Project, the tablets remain in high demand today — more than 4 million tablets were sold in Ghana alone in 2015, with similar sales figures in 2016.

Why so popular after all these years? First and foremost, affordability — but also a proven ability to bolster community health, and reduce the prevalence of dangerous waterborne illnesses like cholera.

Read the complete article.

Global Waters: Reducing the Drip of Irrigation Energy Costs

Reducing the Drip of Irrigation Energy Costs. Global Waters, July 18, 2017.

Throughout the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, fresh water is being consumed faster than it is being replenished.

Irrigation accounts for most of this use. Unlike traditional flood-style or rain-fed irrigation, drip irrigation delivers controlled amounts of water directly to each plant through a series of tubes and emitters.

An MIT drip emitter, capable of operating at one-seventh the pressure and using half the energy of conventional drip systems. Photo Credit: MIT GEAR Lab

An MIT drip emitter, capable of operating at one-seventh the pressure and using half the energy of conventional drip systems. Photo Credit: MIT GEAR Lab

This can reduce agricultural water consumption by 30 to 60 percent and increase crop yields by 20 to 50 percent, yet only 27 percent of the irrigated cropland in MENA countries uses the technology.

For the small-scale farmers who make up the bulk of agricultural producers in the MENA region, the cost of a drip system and the cost to run it are often barriers to making the shift from traditional to drip irrigation.

A new USAID partnership is working to bring down these costs for farmers.

Read the complete article.

Global Waters: In Mali, Communities Take Health and Well-Being into their Own Hands

In Mali, Communities Take Health and Well-Being into their Own Hands. Global Waters, July 18, 2017.

In the center of Simaye village in Mali’s Mopti Region, men, women, and children gather under a large tree to listen. Two USAID-trained facilitators discuss the health challenges facing the village.

Tackling open defecation in communities is a starting point for improved health. Ensuring the drinking water sources are clean is another. USAID works with local artisans in communities like Anga to repair or rehabilitate artesian drilling, such as this one, as an incentive to become ODF-certified. Photo Credit: CARE Mali

Tackling open defecation in communities is a starting point for improved health. Ensuring the drinking water sources are clean is another. USAID works with local artisans in communities like Anga to repair or rehabilitate artesian drilling, such as this one, as an incentive to become ODF-certified. Photo Credit: CARE Mali

Only three latrines serve many families, so more than half of the people are practicing open defecation; the water point no longer functions, so most families are pulling dirty water from the river; many of the infants and young children are not benefitting from exclusive breastfeeding or a diversified diet, so they are malnourished.

Holding a glass of clear water and pointing to feces on the ground, the facilitators paint a clear picture of the health risks associated with leaving feces in the open — contaminated drinking sources, diarrheal disease, and poor outcomes for children and their families.

Their objective: to trigger a sense of disgust, a determination in the community to control their own health and well-being, and to set in motion plans and solutions to create open defecation free (ODF) communities through a process known as community-led total sanitation (CLTS).

Read the complete article.

Launch of the USAID Global Waters website

Introducing Globalwaters.org , a global knowledge resource for partners, USAID staff, and the broader community working in the international development water sector.

Supported by the USAID Water Office, this site aims to connect people to the right resources and ideas to help solve global water and sanitation challenges, as USAID and its partners work toward a healthier and more secure future for all. usaidlogo

Please check out the site and read our companion article that provides an overview of the website’s features.

We welcome your feedback .

We are always looking for new material to post on Globalwaters.org and would be happy to promote your water-related content, including events, blogs, reports, toolkits, and webinars. Feel free to reach out and suggest new material .

USAID Global Waters – May 2017

USAID Global Waters – May 2017

Articles in this issue include:

Where WASH Saves Lives: Creating New Traditions in Nepal: Safe WASH II is trying a new approach to chhaupadi to ensure sustained behavior change with the hope that traditional healers and religious leaders can harness community energy to transform the meaning of menstrual taboos globalwaters

Doubling Access to Safe Drinking Water: How Four African Countries Did It – The WALIS project identified four common elements applied to local systems in Ethiopia, Rwanda, Senegal, and South Africa that contributed to meeting the Millennium Development Goal for clean water access to help other countries learn how to replicate their success.

Tackling Water Issues Lightens the Load for Garment Workers: On World Water Day 2017, USAID and Gap Inc. announced the formation of the Women + Water Global Development Alliance to advance the health and well-being of women, families, and communities touched by the apparel industry.

Real Impact: Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability: Working in six sites in the Philippines, Be Secure has spent the past five years increasing sustainable access to water and wastewater treatment services and resilience to water stress and extreme weather.

With Water Pours Out Hope: One Village in Tajikistan Builds a Better Future: USAID is working with local governments to improve their capacity to deliver municipal services and providing support to install inexpensive water systems to improve citizens’ access to clean drinking water.

Global Waters – Tackling Water Issues Lightens the Load for Garment Workers

Tackling Water Issues Lightens the Load for Garment Workers. Global Waters, May 2017.

The apparel industry employs millions of people throughout the world, a majority of whom are women. In many garment-producing countries women also bear the disproportionate burden for household responsibilities, particularly water collection.

Lack of access to safe drinking water and sanitation takes up their time, affects their health, lowers their income-earning potential, and stands in the way of caring for families and improving their education.

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India, one of the world’s major garment producers and exporters, will be the first focus country of the Women + Water Alliance. Photo Credit: Andre Fanthome

On World Water Day 2017, USAID and Gap Inc. announced the formation of the Women + Water Global Development Alliance to advance the health and well-being of women, families, and communities touched by the apparel industry.

The partnership will be USAID’s first water sector public-private partnership to focus on women as change agents by increasing their participation in decisionmaking and improving access to sustainable water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH).

Read the complete article.

Global Waters – Doubling Access to Safe Drinking Water: How Four African Countries Did It … and How Others Can, Too

Doubling Access to Safe Drinking Water: How Four African Countries Did It … and How Others Can, Too. Global Waters, May 2017.

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Rwanda encourages citizen participation in decision making at all levels of public administration under a practice called “Imihigo.” Photo Credit: HTSPE/DAI

In 1990, the East African nation of Ethiopia stood among the nations in most dire need of water development. Seventeen years of war had left its government and systems in disarray.

Only 11 percent of its more than 48 million people had access to piped or other improved water sources; the rest used unimproved sources such as unprotected wells and carted drums.

Predictably, Ethiopia and countries in similar straits suffered through high rates of communicable, pandemic, and vector-borne disease, child mortality, and other challenges tied to water, sanitation, and hygiene.

Today, Ethiopia’s population has surpassed 100 million, but the magnitude of the country’s success in providing drinking water to nearly half its people in 25 years — despite its diversity, size, and history of war and famine — cannot be overstated.

We must ask: How did Ethiopia and other countries in sub-Saharan Africa double (or more) the proportion of their people with sustainable access to safe drinking water? The answers should be applied to similar countries and their people so they can become water secure and answer the challenges tied to poor water, sanitation, and hygiene, or WASH.

The USAID Water for Africa through Leadership and Institutional Support(WALIS) project is doing just that.

Read the complete article.