Swachh Bharat Mission Hygiene Index

Swachh Bharat Mission Hygiene Index

Since the announcement of the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan two-and-a-half years ago, individuals, communities and government bodies have busied themselves in a flurry of activity to realise the dream of a clean and sanitary India. swach2

While someone is trying to bring toilets to a remote village, someone else is trying to clean a river, while others are simply trying to build toilets for their own households.

This is the true story of the ambitious Swachh India campaign—a recognition that the country will never be truly ‘swachh’ until all stakeholders, from the government to corporates to each and every citizen, participate and do their bit.

To maintain the momentum and keep these efforts on track, constant evaluation is needed. And this is where the Hygiene Index comes in.

Read More: Swachh Hygiene Index: How Close Are We To The Dream Of A Swachh Bharat?

The Hygiene Index has been developed in support of the Swachh Bharat Mission, and evaluates various parameters that can help nudge cities in the direction of better sanitation and hygiene.

Read more.

Focus on Community-Led Total Sanitation – Water Currents, April 18, 2017

Focus on Community-Led Total Sanitation – Water Currents, April 18, 2017

Welcome to the inaugural external issue of Water Currents, a biweekly publication from USAID’s Water Teamwatercurrents

Water Currents aims to replace the WASHplus Weekly, which ceased publication in 2016 when the WASHplus Project ended.

Each issue of Water Currents will have a special focus on a featured topic, as well as an update on recent water sector news.

This issue highlights community-led total sanitation (CLTS), including selected 2017 reports and articles on the subject, as well as coverage on open defecation and behavior change and recent CLTS videos. Our “In the News” section features recent articles on household water treatment, WASH training materials and other water matters.

Articles and Reports
Keeping Track: CLTS Monitoring, Certification and Verification. IDS, January 2017. These critical elements of the CLTS process ensure the sustainability of open defecation free achievements and support the behavior change education necessary to improve CLTS implementation.

Local Governance and Sanitation: Eight Lessons from Uganda. Global Sanitation Fund (GSF), April 2017. This case study presents eight lessons learned from the GSF-supported Uganda Sanitation Fund on coordinating, planning, and implementing CLTS at scale through a decentralized government system.

View the complete issue/subscribe.

A big-picture look at the world’s worst Ebola epidemic

A big-picture look at the world’s worst Ebola epidemic. Hutch News, April 12, 2017.

International team of scientists show how real-time sequencing and data-sharing can help stop the next outbreak

An international effort to analyze the entire database of Ebola virus genomes from the 2013–2016 West African epidemic reveals insights into factors that sped or slowed the rampage and calls for using real-time sequencing and data-sharing to contain future viral disease outbreaks.

Published online today in the journal Nature, the analysis found that the epidemic unfolded in small, overlapping outbreaks with surprisingly few infected travelers sparking new outbreaks elsewhere, each case representing a missed opportunity to break the transmission chain and end the epidemic sooner.

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Dr. Gytis Dudas, a Mahan Postdoctoral Fellow at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, is the paper’s lead author. Photo by Bo Jungmayer / Fred Hutch News Service

“We calculated that 3.6 percent of cases traveled, basically meaning that if you were able to focus on those mobile cases and reduce their mobility, you might have had a disproportionate effect on the epidemic,” said computational biologist Dr. Gytis Dudas, a Mahan Postdoctoral Fellow at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the paper’s lead author.

The West African Ebola epidemic dwarfed all previous central African outbreaks of the virus, sickening more than 28,000 people and killing more than 11,000 of them.

The 1,610 Ebola virus genomes analyzed by the researchers represented more than 5 percent of the known cases, the largest sample analyzed for a single human epidemic. The analysis is the first to look at how Ebola spread, proliferated and declined across all three countries most affected: Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. Previous analyses focused primarily on either a single country, a limited time frame or used fewer sequences.

Read the complete article.

At stake in Johannesburg’s ‘recycling wars’: more than trash

At stake in Johannesburg’s ‘recycling wars’: more than trash. Christian Science Monitor, April 2017.

Informal and formal sectors of the economy work side-by-side in many African nations – but can they work together?

APRIL 11, 2017 JOHANNESBURG—In another lifetime, Louis Mahlangu was an electrician. It was a good job, challenging and respectable, the kind of profession that could make his family proud. wastepickers

There was just one problem.

“There was no work,” he says. No matter how hard he looked, Mr. Mahlangu was barely finding enough jobs to scrape by. Then his sister invited him to tag along to her job. The hours were good, she promised, and the pay – well, it was better than anything he was likely to earn replacing wiring in suburban houses.

And so he put on a pair of rubber rain boots, hiked to the top of a squelching mountain of Johannesburg’s garbage, and began digging for plastic.

Twenty-two years later, he’s still there, along with thousands of others like him, collecting dinged Coke bottles and pulverized yogurt cartons discarded by the city’s residents and selling them on to private recycling companies. At his peak, Mahlangu says, he made up to $1000 each month, a respectable wage in a country where the newly proposed minimum wage is around $250 per month.

Read the complete article.

WHO Trachoma Fact sheet, April 2017

WHO Trachoma Fact sheet, April 2017.

Key facts

  • Trachoma is a disease of the eye caused by infection with the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis.
  • It is known to be a public health problem in 42 countries, and is responsible for the blindness or visual impairment of about 1.9 million people. Nearly 182 million people live in trachoma endemic areas and are at risk of trachoma blindness.
  • Blindness from trachoma is irreversible.
  • Infection spreads through personal contact (via hands, clothes or bedding) and by flies that have been in contact with discharge from the eyes or nose of an infected person. With repeated episodes of infection over many years, the eyelashes may be drawn in so that they rub on the surface of the eye, with pain and discomfort and permanent damage to the cornea.
  • The World Health Assembly adopted resolution WHA51.11 in 1998, targeting the global elimination of trachoma as a public health problem.
  • The elimination strategy is encapsulated by the acronym “SAFE”: Surgery for advanced disease, Antibiotics to clear C. trachomatis infection, Facial cleanliness and Environmental improvement to reduce transmission.
  • In 2016, more than 260 000 people received surgical treatment for advanced trachoma, and 86 million people were treated with antibiotics. Global-level antibiotic coverage was 47%, a considerable increase compared to the 29% coverage achieved in 2015.

Ghaziabad administration launches ‘Swachhtagrah’ app to monitor open defecation

Ghaziabad administration launches ‘Swachhtagrah’ app to monitor open defecation. Hindustan Times, April 13, 2017.

The Ghaziabad district administration on Thursday launched a mobile app to help officials locate areas where people defecate in the open. Volunteers and monitoring committees will now be able to send complaints and Google map locations of open defecation.

app

Incidents of open defecation can be reported in the app.

According to officials, the ‘Swachhagrah’ app is available on the Google play store but its use will be restricted to use by volunteers and monitoring committee members registered with the district open defecation free (ODF) control room.

The officials aim to provide a total of 12,969 toilets by the end of April as part of the ODF programme. As many as 111 of 196 villages in the district are open defecation-free.

“Once we achieve the ODF status in all of our 196 villages, the app will help volunteers and monitoring committees to check if people are returning to old habits.

They, after providing their login and password, can send complaints and even the location through the app. The complaint will be displayed to all officials and also in the control room,” said Virendra Singh, district Panchayati Raj officer.

Read the complete article.

May 3, 2017 Webinar: WASH Counts in Healthcare Facilities!

To learn how WASH can prevent the spread of healthcare-associated infections, join Medentech and the Global Handwashing Partnership on May 3 at 10 am EST for a webinar observing Hand Hygiene Day (May 5). WASH-in-HCFs-webinar-flyer-724x1024

During this webinar, experts will share information on how to improve WASH in HCFs, including:

  • The World Health Organization (WHO) will share an update from the WHO/UNICEF Global Action Plan on WASH in HCF;
  • USAID’s Maternal & Child Program (MCSP) will discuss how WASH underpins quality of care and contributes to health systems strengthening effort, as well as the Clean Clinic Approach, a WASH program that empowers HCFs to become clean, safe, and desirable;
  • The Beninese Association for Social Marketing (Association Béninoise pour le Marketing Social (ABMS), a member of the PSI network) will provide an overview of how it supports HCFs in Benin to improve hygiene and make services safer for patients;
  • Medentech will share lessons learned from its work in infection prevention across the world and offer some tools for continued hygiene improvement in healthcare clinics globally.

Presenters will also share links to educational resources and tools during the webinar.

We look forward to having you join us on May 3 at 10 am EST!  Please register here: bit.ly/WASHinHCF.