USAID announces the release of the US Global Water Strategy

Global Water Strategy to Create a More Water-Secure World

The U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development recently published the U.S. government’s Global Water Strategy.

Photo Credit: Bobby Neptune Photography

Photo Credit: Bobby Neptune Photography

The Global Water Strategy envisions a water-secure world, where people and nations have the water they need to be healthy, prosperous, and resilient.

To advance the Strategy, the U.S. government will work with partner countries and key stakeholders to achieve four interrelated objectives: 1) increasing access to sustainable safe drinking water and sanitation services, and promoting hygiene; 2) protecting freshwater resources; 3) promoting cooperation on shared waters; and 4) strengthening water governance and financing.

The U.S. government’s efforts will focus on countries and regions where needs and opportunities are greatest and where engagement can best protect our national security interests.

The U.S. Global Water Strategy is required by the Senator Paul Simon Water for the World Act of 2014.

For a copy of the U.S. Global Water Strategy and information on priority countries, please visit USAID.gov.

Flushing Out Sanitation Market Failures – PSI

Flushing Out Sanitation Market Failures. by Aprajita Singh, John Sauer and Bikas Sinha, PSIIMPACT, November 2017. psi

A third of the world’s population — 2.4 billion people — live without sanitation facilities. Not having access to even a basic toilet exposes millions of men, women, and children to risks of morbidity and mortality.

During World Toilet Week, PSI is excited to announce its participation as a member of the Toilet Board Coalition, in large part because we see solutions to this overwhelming problem in the sanitation economy itself.

PSI has begun looking at market-based solutions in Benin, Cote D’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Senegal, and India. In India, alone, 524 million people lack access to any kind of toilet. A problem of this scale necessitates a market system response with the government and the private sector complementing each other to address market failures preventing sanitation access.

Through the Supporting Sustainable Sanitation Improvements (3SI) project, launched by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) and Unilever in 2012, PSI and partners found that 84% of households without toilets wanted to own one.

Here’s an insight into how the project identified and addressed critical market failures as well as provided solutions that worked in the state of Bihar.

Addressing a Fragmented Supply Chain

After conducting market research, the 3SI team learned that people wanted to purchase a toilet, but the components were too expensive. They found that 13-15 different actors existed in the sanitation value chain. Maneuvering this supply chain meant that a customer interested in purchasing a toilet was required to separately transact with multiple players. This made toilet construction a difficult and more expensive than necessary process. It meant a dramatically long wait times for customers to ultimately have functional toilets.

Read the complete article.

Toilet Board Coalition: India Round Table

Panel discussion highlighting our SMART SANITATION ECONOMY collaboration with the Pune Municipal Corporation and a focus on Sanitation Economy opportunities in India.

The Circular Sanitation Economy: Disruptive Innovation Festival Panel – Toilet Board Coalition

The Circular Sanitation Economy: The Commercial Case and Economics for the Biological Cycle in collaboration with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s Disruptive Innovation Festival and panel with our TBC experts and businesses.

Announcing our new Toilet Accelerator Cohort 2018! – Toilet Board Coalition

ANNOUNCING THE 2018 TOILET ACCELERATOR COHORT!
The new 2018 Toilet Accelerator Cohort and the Toilet Board Coalition Selection Committee highlight the innovative projects we will work on together.

 

Not All Toilets Look the Same: A Peak into Citywide Inclusive Sanitation on World Toilet Day – World Bank

Not All Toilets Look the Same: A Peak into Citywide Inclusive Sanitation on World Toilet Day. World Bank, November 17, 2017. CWIS-case-videos-KF

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • World Toilet Day – November 19 – is an apt time to recognize that proper sanitation is key to building thriving and healthy cities.
  • On World Toilet Day, we showcase a series of videos highlighting some good practices in ‘Citywide Inclusive Sanitation’ from around the world.
  • Citywide Inclusive Sanitation means everybody benefits from adequate sanitation, with human waste being safely managed at every point along the service chain.

Read the complete article.

World Toilet Day podcast with Jack Sim, founder of the World Toilet Organization

World Toilet Day podcast with Jack Sim – Finding Impact, November 14, 2017.

Jack Sim, Founder of the World Toilet Organization (WTO) has been a successful businessman for all of his adult life. After achieving financial success in his 40s, he felt a strong desire to give back to humanity. findingimpactlogo250px

Jack found that toilets were often neglected and grew concerned that the topic was draped in embarrassment and taboo. In 1998, he established the Restroom Association of Singapore (RAS) whose mission was to raise the standards of public toilets in Singapore and around the world.

Jack soon realized that there were other organizations worldwide like RAS, however, they lacked the channels to collaborate and share ideas. As a result, in 2001, Jack founded the World Toilet Organization (WTO), eventually earning himself the nickname Mr. Toilet.

On this podcast, we will cover:

  • Jack’s interest in tackling a problem that most people felt uncomfortable talking about and how he began to shift this taboo.
  • The origins of World Toilet Day (November 19) and how to be opportunistic when seeking partnerships.
  • The importance of relinquishing credit as a leader and remaining humble. Jack talks about creating a negative space that champions can sign up to eradicate, rather than focusing on being recognized for individual efforts.
  • How to get almost anything for free! While you don’t have resources, you do have a reputation and a story that businesses may want to align with.
  • How to leverage your story to bring attention to your cause. “If you don’t publish, you perish” Academics need to write, ask them how you can help! Helps bring credibility to your cause too.
  • The importance of being mission driven and removing individuals from the equation. “You are not the important thing, the mission is the important thing.”

WSUP – A guide to strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management: experience from Bangladesh, Kenya and Zambia

A guide to strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management: experience from Bangladesh, Kenya and Zambia. WSUP, November 2017. wsup

This Guide presents an introduction to conceptualising and strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management (FSM) services in low-income urban areas.

It is based on WSUP’s experience working with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop market-based solutions for on-site sanitation services in the cities of Dhaka and Chittagong (Bangladesh), Kisumu (Kenya) and Lusaka (Zambia).

Why is FSM so important?

FSM is the process by which faecal sludge is contained, collected, transported, treated and then safely disposed of or reused. 2.7 billion (38%) people around the world are dependent on on-site sanitation facilities like pit latrines and septic tanks, which contain and partially treat faecal sludge on-site (as opposed to centralised systems like sewers that remove waste from households and transport it to treatment facilities).

Read the complete report.