Tag Archives: Community-Led Total Sanitation

Gaining new insights into CLTS and rural WASH from field visits to Babati and Karatu districts, Tanzania – CLTS Knowledge Hub

Gaining new insights into CLTS and rural WASH from field visits to Babati and Karatu districts, Tanzania – CLTS Knowledge Hub, June 2018. clts

CLTS and WASH in the East and Southern Africa region
A five-day regional workshop was held by the CLTS Knowledge Hub in Arusha, Tanzania, in order to foster sharing of knowledge and learning, ideas and innovations, challenges and approaches to CLTS and rural WASH among 36 sanitation practitioners working for international NGOs, cooperation agencies, research centres and at different government levels across eight countries1 from east and southern Africa.

Based on SNV and GoT’s work in the districts, one of the main goals from the visits to Babati and Karatu was to understand and further discuss how CLTS and WASH programming are responding to the need to make the approaches more equitable and inclusive as well as more sustainable in order to deal with the lack of access, the slippages and the low rates of improvement of sanitation facilities which make rural communities strive to reach and maintain Open Defecation Free (ODF) status.

Experiences from the field
The trips started with an early morning visit to a health centre where women with their children were being triggered about hygiene promotion by a local health worker. When we sat down in Magugu Health Centre in Babati, a common scenrio was being acted out by a young mother – she changes her baby’s nappy in front of the group but when she is finished doesn’t go to wash her hands – which prompted the audience to discuss what the problem with this was and what could have been done better. The triggering session then focused on the other critical moments for handwashing throughout the day. During the process the participants learnt about of the main hygiene hazards and procedures, and the health worker emphasised the importance of sharing these messages with the rest of the community.

Read the complete article.

Advertisements

CLTS studies/resources on CLTS/men & boys, CLTS and children learning brief and more

Below are excerpts from the latest newsletter from IDS Community-Led Total Sanitation:

If you missed our recent webinar, ‘The Other Side of Gender – Sanitation, Men and Boys’, on how men and boys can be more meaningfully engaged in sanitation and hygiene processes to achieve sustainable behaviour change and a new social norms, you can watch it here. The PowerPoint presentation can also be downloaded hereHUB_logo

You can also watch this interesting short interview where Daniel Kitasian Sironka (County Public Health Officer, Narok County Government) talks about his experiences in engaging pastoralist men and boys in community sanitation in Kenya.

Continue reading

Institutional triggering for improved sanitation in Uganda

Institutional triggering for improved sanitation in Uganda

CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS, Published on May 10, 2018

Mujuni Kitimbo Jimmy (Field Officer, Ministry of Health, Uganda) talks about successes using ‘Institutional Triggering – an Advocacy Tool’ with Community Leaders resulting in improved sanitation for communities in Uganda.

This interview was filmed at the East and Southern Africa Regional Sharing and Learning Workshop on CLTS and Rural Sanitation 16 – 20 April 2018, Arusha, Tanzania.

The event was organised by the CLTS Knowledge Hub with support from SNV Tanzania. It was funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida).

Promoting sanitation behaviour change in Tanzania

Promoting sanitation behaviour change in Tanzania

CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS, Published on May 10, 2018

Anyitike Mwakitalima (Tanzania National Sanitation Campaign Coordinator) talks about the second phase of the campaign (2016 – 2020) that focuses on promoting drivers for nationwide behaviour change to improve household and public facility sanitation across the country.

This interview was filmed at the East and Southern Africa Regional Sharing and Learning Workshop on CLTS and Rural Sanitation 16 – 20 April 2018, Arusha, Tanzania.

The event was organised by the CLTS Knowledge Hub with support from SNV Tanzania. It was funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida).

An Examination of CLTS’s Contributions Toward Universal Sanitation

Pleased to share a new report from USAID for dissemination: An Examination of CLTS’s Contributions Toward Universal Sanitation.

This review of scientific and gray literature related to community-led total sanitation (CLTS) assesses the knowledge base on best practices and identifies evidence gaps.  It was prepared for USAID by the Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project under Task Order number AID-OAA-TO-16-00016 of the Water and Development Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity Contract (WADI), contract number AID-OAA-I-14-00068.

This review offers a description of the CLTS intervention, tracing its evolution in theory and practice from Southeast Asia to its current place as a global phenomenon, and explores the open defecation free (ODF) concept, analyzing its strengths and weaknesses.

It highlights the disconnect between the independent monitoring and analysis of CLTS program results and internal performance reports released by implementing organizations and their donors. This review also seeks to assess circumstances in which CLTS works best, the most promising implementation modalities, and instances where CLTS may not be suitable.

This literature review was made possible by contributions from Jeff Albert, Valentina Zuin, Rachel Peletz, Caroline Delaire, and Ranjiv Khush (Aquaya Institute); Morris Israel and Jonathan Annis (Tetra Tech); Joe Brown (Georgia Institute of Technology); Marion (Mimi) Jenkins (University of California, Davis); and Aditi Krishna and Hannah Taukobong (Iris Group).

Dean Spears on what motivated ‘Where India Goes?’

Dean Spears on what motivated ‘Where India Goes?’ Community Led Total Sanitation, March 30, 2018.

In this short video interview Dean Spears (Executive Director, RICE/Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Texas at Austin) talks about the key motivations behind the award-winning book he co-authored with Diane Coffey, ‘Where India Goes: Abandoned toilets, stunted development, and the cost of caste.’ Dean Spears_0

The book addresses a central puzzle: why is open defecation so persistently high in rural India?

And what to do about it?

It presents evidence showing that poor sanitation is an important determinant of the poor health outcomes of India’s children, and that the continuing relevance of the purity, pollution and untouchability norms of the caste system keeps open defecation alive today despite decades of government latrine construction programmes.

The main motivation for writing the book as Dean reflects in the interview, ‘hopefully it will get people involved and excited about trial and error around these solutions to these problems of purity and pollution and latrine pits filling up. Hopefully that can lead to something that really can accelerate the decline of open defecation in rural India.’

Global Waters Radio: Jacky Ralaiarivony on Water and Sanitation in Madagascar

Global Waters Radio: Jacky Ralaiarivony on Water and Sanitation in Madagascar. Global Waters, January 2018.

“I am really optimistic….I can tell you, other countries, they come here to learn more about how Madagascar is implementing these community-led total sanitation activities.”

For the past eight years, Jacky Ralaiarivony has served as USAID/Madagascar’s water and sanitation program specialist. During that time, he has helped expand the role that public-private partnerships play in the island’s capacity-building efforts to improve water supply, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH), and has also been closely involved with Madagascar’s successful community-led total sanitation (CLTS) campaign, which continues to take root across rural districts and has become an internationally recognized success.

madagascar

A local mason examines a SanPlat latrine slab in Amboditafara, Madagascar. Photo credit: Water CKM Project

Jacky recently spoke with Global Waters Radio from the USAID/Madagascar office in Antananarivo about the reasons behind CLTS’ success on the island, the importance of monitoring and evaluation in strengthening the mission’s WASH programming, and prospects for Madagascar fully eliminating open defecation in the years ahead.

Read the complete article/listen to the podcast.