Tag Archives: Community-Led Total Sanitation

Recent sanitation research updates

Building Capacity for Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Programming: Training Evaluation Theory Applied to CLTS Management Training in Kenya. Social Science and Medicine, August 2016. There are many training evaluation methods and tools available. However, such WASH training evaluations have been infrequent and lacked rigor. The authors have developed a conceptual framework for evaluating training in WASH by reviewing and adapting concepts from the literature.

The Addis Agreement: Using CLTS in Urban and Peri-Urban Areas. CLTS Knowledge Hub, August 2016. This paper is the outcome of a 2-day conference in Ethiopia June 13-15, 2016 where participants shared their varied experiences and discussed what value a CLTS approach can bring to the urban context.

Using a CLTS Approach in Peri-Urban and Urban Environments: Potential at Scale. CLTS Knowledge Hub, August, 2016. This Learning Brief summarizes the potential and limitations of using a CLTS approach in peri-urban and urban environments.

Formative Research to Develop Appropriate Participatory Approaches Towards Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene in Rural Areas. India WASH Forum, June 2016. This study was conducted to understand perceptions, barriers, and motivators for improved sanitation behavior in rural India.

Effect of Eliminating Open Defecation on Diarrhoeal Morbidity: An Ecological Study of Nyando and Nambale Sub-Counties, Kenya. BMC Public Health, August 2016. The study found that the two sub-counties with open defecation free status had a lower prevalence of diarrhea compared to sub-counties which were yet to attain open defecation free status.

The Impact of a Rural Sanitation Programme on Safe Disposal of Child Faeces: A Cluster Randomised Trial in Odisha, India. Transactions of the Royal Society Tropical Medicine Hygiene, July 2016. The researchers concluded that to achieve open defecation free communities, sanitation interventions will need to develop behavior change approaches that explicitly target safe disposal behaviors.

USAID APHIAplus -Community-led sanitation in Nakuru County, Kenya

Published on Aug 3, 2016

APHIAplus Nuru ya Bonde project works with technical teams in five Kenyan counties to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). Over the past five years, the project has helped to significantly increase access to functional latrines in the five counties it covers.

In Nakuru County, Efforts are focused on working with public health officials and communities to stamp out open defecation, practiced by only 3% of the community. This video presents some of the project’s work in the county.

 

CLTS in Post Emergency and Fragile States Settings

CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS  – Recording of a webinar on CLTS in Post Emergency and Fragile States Settings held on the 21st July 2016.

Speaker: Frank Greaves, Tearfund

 

2016 WEDC conference presentations on CLTS

The 122 presentations from the 2016 WEDC conference are now online at http://wedc.lu/wedc39 and below are titles of presentations on the topic of community-led total sanitation. wedc_moodle

  1. Building ODF communities through effective collaboration with governments
  2. CLTS plus : making CLTS ever more inclusive
  3. CLTS versus other approaches to promote sanitation: rivalry or complementarity?
  4. Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) in fragile contexts: the Somalia case
  5. Partial usage of toilets: a growing problem
  6. Seeking evidence of sustained sanitation successes
  7. Shocking imagery and cultural sensitivity: a CLTS case study from Madagascar
  8. To ODF and beyond: sharing experiences from the Pan African CLTS programme
  9. Using a CLTS approach and/or CLTS tools in urban environments: themes and trends
  10. Who is managing the post-ODF process in the community? A case study of Nambale District in Western Kenya
  11. Good governance for sustainable WASH programming: lessons from two USAID-funded projects

The Dawn of a Sanitation Revolution in India – World Bank

The sanitation campaign in India is helping Rajasthan become a top performing state in ending open defecation. The Chief Minister of Rajasthan declared sanitation as one of the state’s top development priorities, with a target of eliminating open defecation by 2018.

To bring this vision to fruition, an innovative Community Led Total Sanitation Campaign (CLTS) was launched in many districts with the leadership of district collectors.

The approach focuses on crucial issues: Behavior Change and Demand Creation. From Health Centers, to Schools, to door-to-door visits, the message of sanitation and hygiene was effectively communicated.

Health is blooming, one home at a time. One village at a time. And Rajasthan is on course to becoming open defecation free.

Sustainable Sanitation for All: Experiences, challenges, and innovations

Sustainable Sanitation for All: Experiences, challenges, and innovations, June 2016. Practical Action.

Great strides have been made in improving sanitation in many developing countries. Yet, 2.4 billion people worldwide still lack access to adequate sanitation facilities and the poorest and most vulnerable members of society are often not reached and their specific needs are not met. sanitation

Moreover, sustainability is currently one of the key challenges in CLTS and wider WASH practice, subsuming issues such as behaviour change, equity and inclusion, physical sustainability and sanitation marketing, monitoring and verification, engagement of governments, NGOs and donors, particularly after open defecation free (ODF) status is reached, and more.

Achievement of ODF status is now recognised as only the first stage in a long process of change and sanitation improvement, with new challenges emerging every step of the way, such as how to stimulate progress up the sanitation ladder, how to ensure the poorest and marginalised are reached, or how to maintain and embed behaviour change.

There have been several useful studies on sustainability that have highlighted some of these different aspects as well as the complexities involved. This book develops these key themes by exploring current experience, practices, challenges, innovations and insights, as well as identifying a future research agenda and gaps in current knowledge.

Describing the landscape of sustainability of CLTS and sanitation with reference to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and through examples from Africa and Asia, the book captures a range of experiences and innovations from a broad range of institutions and actors within the WASH sector, and attempts to make recommendations and practical suggestions for policy and practice for practitioners, funders, policy-makers and governments.

Shifting the perspective: how urban CLTS can contribute to achieving universal access to sanitation

Shifting the perspective: how urban CLTS can contribute to achieving universal access to sanitation. Source: CLTS Blog, July 6 2016 |

Author: Sue Cavill

Urban sanitation differs from rural sanitation in many ways however one of the fundamental differences is that in urban areas one group, (usually the wealthy), benefits from the public provision of sanitation at the expense of others  (usually the poor). Poor households in urban areas must often find their own solutions to failures in sanitation services. During a workshop on urban CLTS (U-CLTS) held in Ethiopia and hosted by Plan International, we explored the potential of CLTS to support safely managed, city-wide sanitation. clts

We heard how communities in Ethiopia, Mauritania, India, Madagascar, Kenya and Nepal have participated in the design and management of sanitation services and exerted influence over public and private service providers through a U-CLTS approach. The examples highlighted how the collective nature of sanitation means that community structures, rather than individual choices, are critical to sanitation service delivery. The case studies illustrated how the ‘community-led’ aspect of U-CLTS has resulted in: (1) provision of sanitation facilities to substitute for public/private sanitation providers and to compensate for weak government institutions, (2) collaboration between communities and government to coproduce a range of services across the sanitation chain as well as (3) increasing poor people’s ability to make demands on government for universal access.

Read the complete article.