Tag Archives: USAID

What’s New on Globalwaters.org? Stockholm Recap and More

What’s New on Globalwaters.org? Stockholm Recap and More. Global Waters, September 25, 2017.

USAID and its water sector partners spent the last week of August with other experts, practitioners, and policymakers at World Water Week in Stockholm. This year the Stockholm International Water Institute agenda focused on reducing and reusing water and waste in recognition of the vital roles that water use efficiency, wastewater treatment, conservation, and water recycling play in bolstering water security throughout the world.

Tapping capital markets to finance WASH investments. Photo Credit: Stockholm International Water Institute

Tapping capital markets to finance WASH investments. Photo Credit: Stockholm International Water Institute

In addition to presenting at eight different events on topics ranging from sewer connectivity and fecal sludge management in the Latin America and Caribbean region to building Africa’s leadership in sanitation, Agency representatives and partners took the time to observe, discuss, and provide highlights of their sessions and impressions of others. USAID’s Deputy Assistant Administrator and Acting Global Water Coordinator James Peters was on hand to provide opening remarks at five of those USAID sessions.

Read the complete article.

What We’re Learning: Long-Term Outcomes of USAID’s Water and Sanitation Efforts

What We’re Learning: Long-Term Outcomes of USAID’s Water and Sanitation Efforts. by Globalwaters.org, September 2017.

Authors: Annette Fay, Water Communications and Knowledge Management Project monitoring and evaluation specialist and lead researcher for the evaluation series, and Elizabeth Jordan, USAID water and sanitation specialist.globalwaters2

To better understand the long-term impact and sustainability of its interventions, the USAID Water Office is conducting a series of independent ex-post evaluations of the Agency’s water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) activities to inform future USAID investments in the sector.

This evaluation series will help USAID understand whether and how its activity results have been sustained years after projects close. All activities included in the series must have been closed for a minimum of three years and could not be recipients of Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance or Food for Peace funding. Preference is given to USAID missions that are at a point in their design cycle to incorporate learnings into upcoming WASH programs.

This evaluation series builds upon USAID and Rotary International’s WASH Sustainability Index Tool, which is a framework to assess a WASH activity’s likelihood to be sustainable according to five factors: availability of finance for sanitation, local capacity for construction and maintenance of latrines, the influence of social norms, and governance.

In September 2016, the first evaluation in this series studied the Madagascar Rural Access to New Opportunities for Health and Prosperity (RANO-HP) activity.

What We Did

RANO-HP, implemented by a consortium led by Catholic Relief Services from 2009 to 2013, aimed to increase sustainable access to safe water supply, improve sanitation coverage, and expand hygiene practices.

This evaluation of RANO-HP focused on the sustainability of the activity’s sanitation and hygiene components, which included community-led total sanitation (CLTS), behavior change messaging, public WASH “monoblocks” (combined public water point, latrine, shower and laundry station) managed via public-private partnerships, commune-level water and sanitation business plans, village savings and loans associations (VSLAs), and microfinance products for sanitation investments. Through household survey and interviews with beneficiaries the evaluation team explored barriers and facilitators of sustainability.

Read the complete article.

USAID participation at World Water Week 2017

Are You Heading to Stockholm for World Water Week 2017?

It’s that time of the year: World Water Week kicks off in Stockholm on August 27th!

This year World Water Week will focus on “water and waste: reduce and reuse,” in recognition of the vital roles that water use efficiency, wastewater treatment, conservation, and water recycling play in bolstering water security throughout the world. usaidlogo

We hope you will join USAID and its partners for the following World Water Week events:

Monday, August 28th

Tuesday, August 29th

Wednesday, August 30th

Thursday, August 31st

Whether you plan on attending World Water Week in person or following events from afar, stay tuned to @USAIDWater for the latest updates from Stockholm, and join the conversation online using the hashtag #WWWeek.

Global Waters: Reducing the Drip of Irrigation Energy Costs

Reducing the Drip of Irrigation Energy Costs. Global Waters, July 18, 2017.

Throughout the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, fresh water is being consumed faster than it is being replenished.

Irrigation accounts for most of this use. Unlike traditional flood-style or rain-fed irrigation, drip irrigation delivers controlled amounts of water directly to each plant through a series of tubes and emitters.

An MIT drip emitter, capable of operating at one-seventh the pressure and using half the energy of conventional drip systems. Photo Credit: MIT GEAR Lab

An MIT drip emitter, capable of operating at one-seventh the pressure and using half the energy of conventional drip systems. Photo Credit: MIT GEAR Lab

This can reduce agricultural water consumption by 30 to 60 percent and increase crop yields by 20 to 50 percent, yet only 27 percent of the irrigated cropland in MENA countries uses the technology.

For the small-scale farmers who make up the bulk of agricultural producers in the MENA region, the cost of a drip system and the cost to run it are often barriers to making the shift from traditional to drip irrigation.

A new USAID partnership is working to bring down these costs for farmers.

Read the complete article.

Launch of the USAID Global Waters website

Introducing Globalwaters.org , a global knowledge resource for partners, USAID staff, and the broader community working in the international development water sector.

Supported by the USAID Water Office, this site aims to connect people to the right resources and ideas to help solve global water and sanitation challenges, as USAID and its partners work toward a healthier and more secure future for all. usaidlogo

Please check out the site and read our companion article that provides an overview of the website’s features.

We welcome your feedback .

We are always looking for new material to post on Globalwaters.org and would be happy to promote your water-related content, including events, blogs, reports, toolkits, and webinars. Feel free to reach out and suggest new material .

USAID Afghanistan – Jobs Creation Program (AJCP) with WASH component

USAID Afghanistan – Jobs Creation Program (AJCP) with WASH component, June 19, 2017

As the economy grows and expands, providing access to potable water and the adoption of badly needed phytosanitary standards can begin to be instituted which will benefit multiple industry and service sectors. usaidlogo

Further, safe, clean water and sanitary facilities are critical to value chain development as well as conducting commerce in high population urban and peri-urban areas.

As the Afghan workforce becomes better educated as a result of workplace interventions and education on standards for proper sanitation and hygiene practices, the households and ultimately communities will respond by adopting new and sustained hygienic practices. These practices will help reduce wide-spread disease, diminishing workplace absenteeism and ensure a healthy and capable workforce.

The WASH supply and value chain will benefit from and contribute to the growth of new employment opportunities and make major contributions to these value chains that rely on clean water, hygienic conditions and sanitary environments to achieve value chain development are met.

Through this APS, USAID aims to promote wider adoption of improved sanitation facilities within households, workplaces, and other private sector facilities and encourage new and innovative WASH technology utilization. These initiatives help support ‘best of class’ business practices that demand adoption of international standards, including hygienic business practices, especially where high-value fruits and vegetables enter the global food chain.

Funding for drinking water and sanitation value chains will contribute to the growth of new employment opportunities among local MSMEs. Through this APS, USAID particularly aims to develop domestic markets for improved sanitation facilities within households, workplaces, and other private sector facilities.

USAID Global Waters – May 2017

USAID Global Waters – May 2017

Articles in this issue include:

Where WASH Saves Lives: Creating New Traditions in Nepal: Safe WASH II is trying a new approach to chhaupadi to ensure sustained behavior change with the hope that traditional healers and religious leaders can harness community energy to transform the meaning of menstrual taboos globalwaters

Doubling Access to Safe Drinking Water: How Four African Countries Did It – The WALIS project identified four common elements applied to local systems in Ethiopia, Rwanda, Senegal, and South Africa that contributed to meeting the Millennium Development Goal for clean water access to help other countries learn how to replicate their success.

Tackling Water Issues Lightens the Load for Garment Workers: On World Water Day 2017, USAID and Gap Inc. announced the formation of the Women + Water Global Development Alliance to advance the health and well-being of women, families, and communities touched by the apparel industry.

Real Impact: Water Security for Resilient Economic Growth and Stability: Working in six sites in the Philippines, Be Secure has spent the past five years increasing sustainable access to water and wastewater treatment services and resilience to water stress and extreme weather.

With Water Pours Out Hope: One Village in Tajikistan Builds a Better Future: USAID is working with local governments to improve their capacity to deliver municipal services and providing support to install inexpensive water systems to improve citizens’ access to clean drinking water.