Tag Archives: USAID

USAID Kenya Integrated Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Project (KIWASH)

USAID Kenya Integrated Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Project (KIWASH)

KIWASH aims to enable more than one million Kenyans across 9 counties to gain access to improved WASH services & increase access to irrigation & nutrition. kiwash

We are working with Geodesic Water Company in Kamulu, Nairobi County to increase household connections and access to water services, and improve reliability of water supply for more people.

Find out what KIWASH is doing to promote commercial lending to the Kenyan water sector.

Webinar – Involving The Private Sector In Increasing Access To Basic Sanitation In Bihar And Abidjan

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Published on Apr 24, 2017

Only 22% of Abidjan’s population has access to basic sanitation. Many low-income residents of the city live in compound houses of 4 to 45 persons, who share a common toilet.

The situation is not too different in Bihar where only 30% of the population have access to basic sanitation, and open defecation is still rife.

This webinar explores successes and failures of the strategies from:

  • the USAID Sanitation Service Delivery (SSD) program’s Healthy Compound model in Abidjan, which is using a total market approach to develop prefabricated septic tanks made of ferrocement; and
  • the Supporting Sustainable Sanitation (3Si) project in Bihar, which has used a market-based approach to overcome supply and demand barriers to latrine access and use.

    Presenters:

  • Bikas Sinha is 3Si’s General Manager for Programs. He will introduce the 3Si project and strategy and outline the milestones and learning.
  • Lassina Togola is USAID SSD’s sanitation Technical Advisor in Abidjan. He will offer first-hand experience of progress, lessons and challenges to date regarding the Healthy Compound model.
  • Dana Ward is SSD’s Chief of Party. He will introduce the discussion and set the context for providing affordable sanitation through the private sector.

In addition to the recorded webinar, the following supplementary resources are available:

WASH is a Key Ingredient in Tackling Poverty in Kenya – Global Waters

WASH is a Key Ingredient in Tackling Poverty in Kenya. Global Waters, March 2017.

Picture a rural household in Kisumu, Kenya. Kale, cowpeas, tomatoes, and butternut grow in a kitchen garden fed by a drip irrigation system. Children help harvest these vegetables for the stew that complements their family’s diet, formally reliant on maize and sorghum. A handwashing station adjacent to the cooking hut and the improved latrine remind family members to wash with soap at critical times.

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A farmer works in a greenhouse at a KIWASH-supported agriculture and nutrition demonstration farm in the largest health facility in Kisumu county. Photo Credit: Eric Onyiego, USAID KIWASH

Thanks to a new community solar-powered borehole, the family is no longer solely dependent on what the rain provides for drinking water. The family garden produces more food than is needed, and the remainder is sold to provide additional income.

Unlike millions of Kenyans, this family is overcoming the cycle of food insecurity, diarrheal disease, malnutrition, and poverty with the support of USAID’s Kenya Integrated Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (KIWASH) Project.

Working to improve the lives and health of one million Kenyans in nine counties, the five-year project (2015–2020) focuses on the development and management of sustainable water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services and increased access to irrigation and nutrition services.

Read the complete article.

Treating Wastewater as a Resource – Global Waters

Treating Wastewater as a Resource. Global Waters, March 2017.

The theme of World Water Day 2017 — wastewater—provides an ideal moment to pause and reflect on how this often maligned and misunderstood water source can be treated safely to improve public health and enhance quality of life.

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The new Tacloban City Septage Treatment Facility is the first plant of its size in the Philippines to use a process called lime stabilization to treat wastewater. Photo Credit: USAID/Philippines

Thanks to technological advances in wastewater treatment and disposal, as well as improved sanitation management practices, many communities are even recognizing that water, once used, can still be put to productive use — making wastewater a largely untapped renewable freshwater source for increasing food production and facilitating economic development in water-stressed areas.

In celebration of World Water Day, USAID invites you to travel around the world in the photo essay below to see how the Agency’s wastewater programming is helping improve sanitation access, increase water security, drive job creation, and create healthier, more livable communities for millions of people.

View the photo essay.

 

Open Defecation vs. Community Toilets: A Complicated Choice – Global Waters

Open Defecation vs. Community Toilets: A Complicated Choice. Global Waters, February 6, 2017.

She told us all to just forget it. I didn’t catch her name, I just watched her adjust the microphone and stand on tiptoes at the podium. Her grey hair peeked out from behind and she sounded frustrated.

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A poster showing good hand washing practices outside a community toilet in Delhi. Photo Credit: USAID/India

Forget the security. It won’t make a difference. Forget the caretakers and the cleaning supplies. We don’t need those. We just want sewer lines in our communities. That’s enough now. We want to use a toilet in our home.

The other women in the audience clearly agreed given the loud burst of applause when she mentioned sewer lines. Instead, she has a community toilet; that or the choice of squatting somewhere out in the open. Choosing between defecating in the open or using a community toilet is layered with far more complexities than I’d understood before.

My colleagues and I from USAID/India were spending the day at a workshop organized by our partner, Centre for Urban and Regional Excellence (CURE). They’re in the early stages of a behavior change communication study that will help us understand why, even with access to community toilets, open defecation is still happening. There were about 100 people living in five slums across Delhi who had given up their day to tell us.

Read the complete article.

USAID’s Global Waters – January 2017

USAID’s Global Waters, January 2017 issue. 

Contents

  • A Decade of Improving Lives and Conserving Ecosystems – One of USAID’s longest running public-private partnerships, the Water and Development Alliance with the Coca-Cola Company and its Foundations, successfully addresses global water challenges. globalwaters
  • The Impact of Strategic Water Programming – USAID Global Water Coordinator Christian Holmes reflects on six years of Agency water accomplishments, approaches, and learning.
  • Improving Water Supplies and Sanitation Services in East Africa – PREPARED works with Uganda’s main water utility to increase the resiliency of the country’s water and sanitation services, making it a model for its water-stressed neighbors
  • And more

USAID’s Safeguarding the World’s Water Report, 2017

Safeguarding the World’s Water Report, 2017. USAID.

USAID proudly announces the release of its Safeguarding the World’s Water report for Fiscal Year (FY) 2015, documenting the Agency’s water sector activities and sharing progress made during the second year of implementing its Water and Development Strategysafeguarding_world_water_fy2015_cover_0

Highlights of some programs featured in this year’s report:

USAID reached 3.2 million children under 5 with nutrition-specific interventions in Ethiopia, where 30 percent of the people live on less than $1.25 a day and 40 percent of the children suffer from stunting, as of FY 2015.

By the end of FY 2015, working in 50 cities across Indonesia, USAID helped to facilitate improved access to safe piped water for more than 2.5 million people and continues to help more than 300,000 obtain access to improved sanitation facilities.

By FY 2015, in the West Bank and Gaza, Agency support for the construction and maintenance of vital water and sanitation infrastructure included the installation of 900 kilometers of water pipelines connecting 130,000 Palestinians to running water for the first time and improving access to clean water for more than a million people