Category Archives: Economic Benefits

The Sanitation-Education Connection: What’s a toilet worth in Kenya?

Published on Nov 19, 2016

Sanitation is a critical, yet often overlooked fundamental human right. This documentary, first in a series, broadly describes the worth of the sanitation-education connection in one area of Kenya, by defining its challenges and presenting solutions.

Water may be life, but the quality of our lives is determined in part by our health and wellbeing. It may be surprising to many of us, but in countries like Kenya, health is largely affected by access to toilets. Sanitation is a critical, yet often overlooked fundamental human right. Globally 2.5 billion people lack access to adequate sanitation. The resulting health risks touch all ages and affect every aspect of life: education included. Impacts reverberate through economies and generations as individuals fail to meet their full potential. Unfortunately sanitation is generally not a topic of common conversation nor is it often an economic priority. It becomes then, a silent emergency.

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Case studies in blended finance for water and sanitation

Case studies in blended finance for water and sanitation, 2016. Water and Sanitation Program.

This report has case studies on facilitating access to finance for household investment in sanitation in Bangladesh, Cambodia, South Africa and other countries.

 

 

A guide to developing reuse and recycling technologies

A guide to developing reuse and recycling technologies in low- and middle-income countries is to be developed by charity WasteAid UK and the Chartered Institution of Wastes Management (CIWM). Resource.Co, Nov 23, 2016.

The report, funded by CIWM, is being led by Professor David Wilson, CIWM Senior Vice President and Patron of WasteAid UK, and will be delivered by the charity, which works to establish waste management processes in developing countries, with support from consultancy Resource Futures, and will draw together the experience of WasteAid UK staff and associates, as well as other organisations that have delivered ‘waste to wealth’ projects.

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WasteAid trainees making charcoal briquettes from organic waste. CIWM

The report will cover reprocessing technologies that require minimal or low capital investment and which produce products for local markets. It will provide case studies and ‘how to’ kits to encourage replication, for municipal solid waste and other key waste streams, as well as the necessary health and safety and environmental protection measures to protect both the workers and society.

The United Nations Environment Programme’s 2015 Global Waste Management Outlook, of which Professor Wilson was the Editor-in-Chief, warned that an ‘urgent response’ is needed to the 10 billion tonnes of urban waste that is produced globally each year, while a report from the International Solid Waste Association found that tens of million of people in developing countries are affected by inadequate sanitation infrastructure.

Read the complete article.

Indian Company Protoprint Transforms Waste into 3D Printing Filament for Commercial Use

Indian Company Protoprint Transforms Waste into 3D Printing Filament for Commercial Use. 3DPrint.com, November 10, 2016.

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Protoprint’s 3D filament in use

This week, we reported on New Zealand-based Waikato University’s revolutionary FDM technology-based 3D printing method that allows anyone to print complex objects by converting waste material into thermoplastic filament, and we’ve seen several initiatives around the world focused on bringing waste material into reuse via 3D printing. An Indian company called Protoprint is leading a similar project but on a more commercial aspect and global scale.

Protoprint, a social enterprise founded by environmental engineer Sidhant Pai and his parents in 2012 to address poor employment conditions and increasing pollution levels, secured a partnership with SWaCH to transform high-density polyethylene (HDPE)-based products such as plastic bottles into filament for 3D printers.

SWaCH, short for Solid Waste Collection and Handling, is a cooperative formed by waste pickers and workers at a waste disposal site in Pune, India. Workers at SWaCH provide Protoprint with the necessary waste material which Pai and his team use to create filaments.

Read the complete article.

Use public money to fund Africa’s water and sewerage systems

Use public money to fund Africa’s water and sewerage systems. Mail & Guardian Africa, October 25, 2016.

Developed countries used government revenue rather than private funds to build infrastructure, so why not Africa?

African stakeholders have called for water supply and sanitation to be a priority at the next meeting of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. They want the November meeting of COP22 to integrate issues related to water supply and sanitation with the climate change agenda.

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A refugee waits to collect water from a well at the Yida refugee camp in South Sudan on April 17 2013. (Andreea Campeanu, Reuters)

Some progress has been made on water and sanitation in the past 20 years. Under the millennium development goals, rates of access in sub-Saharan Africa increased by 20% for drinking water and 6% for sanitation between 1990 and 2015.

But far more needs to be done. Population growth means the number of people without access to drinking water increased from 265-million in 1990 to 316-million in 2015 and those without safe sanitation from 388-million to 692-million.

The sector is in dire need of extensive investment. Estimates vary slightly but, to achieve the millennium development goal targets, Africa would have to spend about $15-billion annually; current spending is about $3.6-billion.

To close the gap, there is support for greater private investment in water in developing countries. But the reality is that the financing gap in Africa can only be addressed viably and equitably with a major increase in public investment.

Read the complete article.

Eight ideas to fund access to water and toilets for all by 2030

Eight ideas to fund access to water and toilets for all by 2030 | Source: The Guardian, September 19 2016 |

Some $114bn is needed each year to reach the SDG on water and sanitation. Our panel of experts share their ideas on how to raise the money 

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How do we raise the funds needed to improve access to water and sanitation for millions? Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

1 | Crack down on illicit financial flows and tax evasion
An estimated $1tn [£0.8tn] flows illegally out of developing countries and emerging economies each year – more than they receive in foreign direct investment and aid combined. Beyond bleeding the world’s poorest economies, this propels crime, corruption and tax evasion. Most of the money is lost through trade mis-invoicing – where trade invoices are manipulated to change the value to secretly move money across borders. Folks in the water and sanitation sector could help promote the importance of raising more domestic revenue by combating tax evasion and avoidance, and push for some of that money to go towards water and sanitation projects. Christine Clough, programme manager, Global Financial Integrity

2 | Increase public investment
The most important route towards financing sanitation and water is increased domestic government investment. For example, a recent estimate of the annual sanitation financing gap in Ghana is $93m [£71m]. Ghana’s GDP is around $38bn [£28bn] and its total tax revenues amount to about 21% of GDP – a pretty good percentage for a low- to middle-income country. But the Ghanaian government currently invests only $7m [£5m] yearly in sanitation: a tiny, trivial amount. If it were instead to invest 0.5% of GDP in sanitation, we’d be looking at about $190m [£145m] – more than enough to cover the country’s financing gap. The bottom line is that countries need to use equitable taxation to support the provision of basic services for poorer citizens. Guy Norman, director of research & evaluation, WSUP

Read the complete article.

Live Q&A: $114bn a year needed for water and toilets – where will it come from?

Live Q&A: $114bn a year needed for water and toilets – where will it come from? | Source: The Guardian, Sept 8, 2016 |

How do we raise funds needed to reach the millions without access to water and sanitation? Discuss with an expert panel on 15 September, 3–4.30pm BST

About $28.4bn (£21.2bn) is spent each year to provide access to water and sanitation around the world. If this investment is maintained, by 2030 everyone will have access to drinking water, an adequate toilet, and a suitable place to wash their hands.

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Access to clean and affordable water and a safe place to go to the toilet will cost $114bn a year. Photograph: Rupak de Chowdhuri/Reuters

But the sustainable development goals go beyond just basic access; they envision a world where everyone has access to clean and affordable drinking water and a safe place to go to the toilet. This level of access will cost $114bn a year, the World Bank estimates.

The water and finance communities need to find ways to triple current levels of investment, and they need to do it quickly. “We’re already one year into the SDGs,” says Bill Kingdom, global lead for water supply and sanitation at the World Bank’s Water Global Practice. “If we carry on with business as usual for the next year, that’s two years gone, and that $114bn a year becomes $127bn for the remaining 13 years.”

Which innovative ideas could realistically help raise the additional $85.6bn needed annually? What will make the water industry attractive to lenders? How do we address the privatisation of services and make sure water and sanitation is affordable for all?

Join an expert panel on Thursday 15 September, from 3pm to 4.30pm BST, to discuss these questions and more.

Read the complete article.