Tag Archives: faecal sludge management

Tender: Sanitation solutions for underserved communities in Jordan

The project, initiated by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), focuses on rethinking sanitation systems, by improving existing Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTP) and exploring the development of small scale Waste Water Treatment (WWT) and Faecal Sludge Treatment (FST) solutions. The goal of these improvements and developments is to increase WWT efficiency and sanitation coverage, and turn waste streams into physical and financial resource streams by ensuring and promoting safe reuse of the treated wastewater and faecal sludge. The focus is on Jordanian host communities as a whole, with a particular attention to be paid to unserved, vulnerable communities, as they are more and more impacted by the lack of adequate sanitation systems. The project will be subdivided into two distinct phases – the inception phase and the main phase.

Project ID 157868|Notice no. 975947

Deadline for submission of the complete bid: 28 August 2017

View the full notice at:
www.simap.ch/shabforms/COMMON/search/searchresult.jsf

Starting May 1 – MOOC on Introduction to Faecal Sludge Management

Published on Mar 21, 2017

The FSM-MOOC will be launched on May 1 on Coursera. Please sign up for the course here: https://www.coursera.org/learn/faecal…. In May, all videos of the course will also be available on this YouTube-channel.

A financially viable and safe solution for managing human waste

Collecting small monthly payments will help waste collectors build their business.

Bangladesh - pit latrine empytiers

Pit latrine workers in Bangladesh collecting and transporting human waste to a site where it is processed into fertiliser. Image: Neil Palmer (IWMI). Credit: University of Leeds

Spreading the cost of emptying pit latrines over a series of monthly payments could make it more affordable for poor households and help kick start the safe reuse of faecal sludge as fertiliser and biogas. This is the conclusion of a willingness-to-pay study carried out in a rural sub-district of Bangladesh covered by the BRAC WASH Programme II.

The study has already caught the attention of policymakers, and influenced the development of Bangladesh’s first regulatory framework for faecal sludge management. Some of the authors are members of the Bangladesh National Committee for Fecal Sludge Management.

Currently, households struggle to pay a lump sum of US$13 every three to four years to empty their pit latrines. This is approximately 14% of their monthly income. Instead, the study found they could pay small monthly payments of as little as US$ 0.31 per month, comparable to what they spend each month on a mobile phone service. These up-front payments help waste collectors to invest in the development of their service. Nevertheless, a government subsidy would still be needed to cover the full cost of safe removal and transport of faecal sludge.

As mentioned above, there is potential for waste collectors to generate extra revenue by converting faecal waste into fertiliser and biogas. The profitability of these waste by-products, however, can be effected by existing subsidies for chemical fertilisers and conventional fuels. Another factor that can reduce profitability is the low energy or calorific value of human waste compared to other organic wastes. A companion study carried out as part of the BRAC WASH Programme II tested solutions to increase the calorific value by co-processing human waste with other agricultural wastes.

The willingness-to-pay study is an output of the Value at the end of the Sanitation Value Chain (VeSV) research project, lead by the University of Leeds. VeSV was one of six action research projects funded by the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (Bangladesh) through IRC. Additional funding was provided by the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

For more information read “Spreading the cost to transform sanitation“, published by the University of Leed’s School of Civil Engineering, 22 March 2017.

Citation: Balasubramanya S, et al. (2017) Towards sustainable sanitation management : establishing the costs and willingness to pay for emptying and transporting sludge in rural districts with high rates of access to latrines. PLoS ONE 12(3): e0171735. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0171735

This news item was originally published on the IRC website, 27 March 2017.

Ushering a new era in sanitation value chain management in India

Report of a WASH Dialogue on faecal sludge and septage management.

By Anupama Sahay

Cambodia faecal sudge management-crop

Faecal sludge management in Cambodia. Photo: Dany Dourng

Is Faecal Sludge and Septage Management (FSSM) an effective and long-term solution in the sanitation value chain? That was the question that Indian sanitation experts reflected on in Jaipur, the state capital of Rajasthan, at a multi-stakeholder dialogue on ‘FSSM Matters: Looking Forward’ on 10 January 2017. The dialogue was the second of the “Insights” series launched last year by the India Sanitation Coalition (ISC), IRC and TARU Leading Edge.

Continue reading

Information on fecal sludge management

4th International Faecal Sludge Management Conference (FSM4), February 19-23, Chennai, India. FSM4 will focus on innovative and practical solutions that can be scaled up, including three tracks: research, case studies, and industry and exhibition.

Sanitation Service Delivery (SSD) Program – Ghana, Ivory Coast and BeninSustainable Sanitation Alliance, November 2016. SSD is a USAID/West Africa urban sanitation project implemented in Cote d’Ivoire, Benin, and Ghana. The project aims to improve sanitation outcomes through developing and testing scalable, market-based models that contribute to structural change within the region’s sanitation sector. Several posts to this forum discuss the SSD program and provide links to SSD’s reports and webinars.

Fecal Sludge Management ToolsThe World Bank, June 2016. The World Bank has developed some tools to diagnose fecal sludge management (FSM) status and to guide decisionmaking. These tools do not provide predefined solutions, as the many variables and stakeholders involved demand interventions that are specific to each city and should be seen within the context of integrated urban water management.

Faecal Waste Flow CalculatorIRC WASH, 2016. The tool is developed to determine fecal waste volumes along the entire service chain, allowing city planners, service authorities, or any other users to determine where the biggest losses are and where interventions should be targeted. Less easily quantifiable issues such as the existence of policies and legislation, availability and transparency of plans and budgets, and presence and adherence to environmental and safety standards are captured with the use of score cards.

Fecal Sludge Management in MadagascarWASHplus, March 2016. This video discusses how USAID’s WASHplus project engaged the international NGO Practica to design and pilot a private-sector service delivery model to sustainably manage fecal sludge generated in the peri-urban area of Ambositra using low-cost decentralized technologies.

2016 WEDC Conference Presentations on Fecal Sludge ManagementSanitation Updates, August 2016. This post has links to each of the eight WEDC 2016 conference presentations on fecal sludge management, topics include analysis of fecal sludge collection efficiency and overcoming capacity gaps in fecal sludge management through education and training.

Smaller is Better when Investing in Fecal Sludge Management in AsiaAsian Development Blog, August 2016. This article discusses small wastewater projects that differ from the bank’s traditional approach of focusing on developing bigger centralized systems that involve large, extensive wastewater networks and infrastructure.

Is There Fecal Sludge on Your Salad? IWA Network, January 2017. This article discusses the Sanitation Safety Planning tool that helps optimize the reuse of wastewater, grey water, and excreta.

SFD toolboxSustainable Sanitation Alliance, January 2017. An excreta flow diagram (also often described as shit flow diagram, SFD) is a tool to readily understand and communicate visualizing how excreta physically flows through a city or town.

Assessing Public Health Risks from Unsafe Fecal Sludge Management in Poor Urban Neighborhoods: What Does SaniPath Tell Us about Exposure to Fecal Contamination in 12 Neighborhoods in 3 Cities? Sanipath, August 2016. This presentation compares the latest results of the SaniPath Study from three different study sites: Accra, Ghana; Vellore, India; and Maputo, Mozambique, and discusses the reliability of the SaniPath Tool data.

Standard For Decentralised Faecal Sludge Treatment In Developing Countries

Standard For Decentralised Faecal Sludge Treatment In Developing Countries. Water Online, November 8, 2016.

TÜV SÜD has started developing a private technical standard for decentralized treatment plants. The aim is to promote innovations for safe and environmentally friendly sanitation in developing countries. The work is funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

“Our experience proves the value of standards in promoting new technologies”, says Dr Andreas Hauser, Director of Water Services at TÜV SÜD. “Establishing common guidelines is a key step towards fostering next-generation faecal sludge treatment plants as well as engaging commercial interests”. The standard will refer to technologies that can convert waste into beneficial outputs, like electricity, biomass, water for irrigation and ash – in accordance with the resource-oriented sanitation approach.

They are operated on a commercial basis and serve up to 10.000-100.000 people improving hygiene, living conditions and creating economic opportunities. For them to become accepted and adopted essential criteria need to be met concerning for example functional safety, treatment performance, occupational health or emission values.

The private technical standard is to define these criteria. It is a follow-on project within the Gates Foundation’s Omni-Processor program. Beginning in November 2015 TÜV SÜD has been examining and evaluating the various requirements and possibly relevant standards for decentralized, community scale faecal sludge treatment solutions.

Developing a standard now takes this work to a new level. Dr Andreas Hauser: “A private technical standard for decentralized faecal sludge treatment plants will benefit the entire value chain towards a resource-oriented sanitation approach.”

Read the complete article.

Targeting urban sanitation – looking behind aggregated city-level data

Targeting urban sanitation – looking behind aggregated city-level data. World Bank Water Blog, Oct 31, 2016. waterblog.png

In our previous blogs – Fecal Sludge Management: the invisible elephant in urban sanitation,  5 lessons to manage fecal sludge better, and A tale of two cities: how cities can improve fecal sludge management – we outlined the neglect of Fecal Sludge Management (FSM) and presented new tools for diagnosing urban sanitation challenges and how they can be used.

Today, on World Cities Day, we are looking more deeply into a city – Lima, Peru, to shed light on how cities around the world can meet opportunities and address challenges of urbanization including providing improved sanitation for a rapidly growing number of urban residents.

The city-wide sanitation picture

To apply one of the better known FSM tools – the fecal waste flow diagram (SFD) – we use data to provide a city-wide picture of sanitation services at the household level, and how the fecal waste flows through the ‘sanitation service chain’: removal and conveyance from the household containment or WC, to treatment and final disposal or reuse.

SFDs provide an easy to understand and visual representation of where fecal waste and the associated pathogens and pollution end up. This enables decision-makers and technical staff to understand and discuss the priority sanitation issues requiring attention in their city.

Read the complete article.