Tag Archives: faecal sludge management

2016 WEDC conference presentations on fecal sludge management

The 122 presentations from the 2016 WEDC conference are now online at http://wedc.lu/wedc39 and below are links to presentations on the topic of fecal sludge management. wedc_moodle

  1. A socio-economic analysis of different approaches to faecal sludge treatment in Sunyani, Ghana Mallory, Adrian
  2. An exploration of sanitation and waste disposal practices in low-income communities in Accra, Ghana Abraham, Ernest M
  3. Analysis of faecal sludge collection efficiency for improvement in developing countries Flamand, Pierre
  4. Comparison of scales for faecal sludge gravimetric characterization in low-resource settings Therrien, Jean-David
  5. Development of low-cost decentralized faecal sludge treatment system for resource recovery Atwijukye, Osbert
  6. Effects of high-strength fecal sludge in wastewater stabilization ponds: Port-au-Prince, Haiti Martinsen, Andrea
  7. How to improve sanitation in Mae La refugee camp: SI sludge treatment unit Cavalazzi, Fabrizio
  8. Overcoming capacity gaps in fecal sludge management through education and training Philippe, Sterenn

 

4th International Faecal Sludge Management Conference

4th International Faecal Sludge Management Conference, 19 – 22 February 2017, Chennai, India

Worldwide, 2.7 billion people rely on onsite sanitation. Yet, there is still typically no management system in place to deal with the resulting faecal sludge (e.g. septage and pit latrine sludge). The result is that the waste typically ends up being dumped directly into the urban environment, with significant health and environmental implications. Creating faecal sludge management (FSM) infrastructure and public services that work for everyone, and keep faecal sludge out of the environment is a major challenge for achieving universal sanitation access.

To address this challenge, a global platform for discussion of FSM was created in 2011 by leading global sector organizations. The aim was to share and brainstorm potential solutions, to formulate policy recommendations that promote best practices, and to identify lessons learned in how to make FSM an integral part of sanitation service delivery. Building on the success of the first three International FSM Conferences in Hanoi (2015) and in Durban (2011& 2012), FSM4 aims to bring together professionals working in the sector, including utilities, service providers, cities, governments, academics, scientists, consultants, donors and industries, to support the global initiative of disseminating sustainable solutions for FSM.

FSM4 will be held in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, where the State Government has recently initiated measures to address FSM with regard to policy, regulatory changes, innovative solutions, and pilots. FSM4 will focus on innovative and practical solutions that can be scaled up, including three tracks: research, case studies, and industry & exhibition.

 

5 lessons to manage fecal sludge better

5 lessons to manage fecal sludge better | Source: by Peter Hawkins & Isabell Blackett, World Bank Water Blog, July 19 2016 |

Our last blog outlined the neglect of Fecal Sludge Management (FSM) and presented new tools for diagnosing FSM challenges and pointing the way to solutions.

World Bank Document

A motorized tricycle fitted with a small tank provides desludging services in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. Photo credit: Kathy Eales / World Bank

In this blog, we’ll share some lessons learned from the city-specific case studies and analysis to highlight key areas which need to be addressed if the non-networked sanitation services on which so many citizens rely are to be effectively managed.

Lesson 1: Fecal sludge management must be included in national policy and legislation

On-site sanitation is often the only sanitation option for poor households, and may account for the majority of all sanitation, in many middle income and poor countries. However, the construction and servicing of on-site facilities is typically left to the unregulated informal sector.

There can even be legal barriers to developing on-site sanitation, although integrated urban water management may identify the provision of clean piped water, with systematic FSM, as a cheaper, more effective solution than city-wide sewerage access. The formal recognition and regulation of on-site sanitation and FSM is therefore critical.

Read the complete article.

Fecal sludge management is the elephant in the room, but we have developed tools to help

Fecal sludge management is the elephant in the room, but we have developed tools to help | Source: World Bank Water Blog, July 6, 2016 |

Recently developed Fecal Sludge Management tools to help address this important, but often-ignored, urban sanitation issue.

In the rapidly expanding cities of the developing world, sanitation is of ever growing importance – more people mean more exposure to fecal pollution, and therefore a greater risk to public health.  The widely accepted solution, taught to sanitary engineers worldwide, is to flush human waste into sewers which take it to large, centralized treatment facilities.

fsm_blog

Discharging fecal sludge in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

This requires expensive infrastructure, a plentiful water supply, skilled operators and a substantial and reliable stream of operating funds. This means that in most low- and middle-income country cities, the sewerage service is only available to a small and decreasing proportion of the population, as investments cannot keep up with the explosive urban growth.

Read the complete article.

Market-based Approaches to Sanitation

Market-based Approaches to Sanitation, 2016. PSI.

Market-based approaches can be applied to deliver a number of products (such as household, shared, or public toilets, using various designs and materials), services (like installation or waste removal and treatment) and forms of service delivery (free or pay-for-use).

This review focuses on models for household pit latrine construction and fecal sludge management.

Fecal Sludge Management Tools – World Bank

Fecal Sludge Management Tools – World Bank

In many cities, the emptying, conveyance, treatment and disposal of fecal sludge has largely been left to unregulated private, informal service providers. FSM_header

To address this neglected but crucial part of urban sanitation, the World Bank has developed some tools to diagnose fecal sludge management (FSM) status and to guide decision-making.

These tools don’t provide pre-defined solutions, as the many variables and stakeholders involved demand interventions specific in each city, and should be seen within the context of integrated urban water management.

Link to the FSM Tools website.

Recent reports, videos on fecal sludge management

EVENTS

4th International Faecal Sludge Management Conference (FSM4) to be Held in Chennai, India, February 2017. FSM4 will focus on innovative and practical solutions that can be scaled up, including three tracks: research, case studies, and industry & exhibition.

VIDEOS

Fecal Sludge Management in Madagascar. WASHplus, 2016. This video summarizes the WASHplus activity in Madagascar on turning “poo into profit.”

Low Cost Technologies for Faecal Sludge Management (FSM) in Kampala, Uganda: A Video. Water for People, May 2016. This holistic approach to sanitation and faecal sludge management is impacting many peoples’ lives, particularly in the slums of Kampala.

ONLINE COURSES

Introduction to Faecal Sludge Management. EAWAG, December 2015. This online video course produced by Linda Strande for the FSM e-Learning alliance (http://www.fsm-e-learning.net/) gives an introduction to faecal sludge and fecal sludge management.

Overview of Faecal Sludge Management (FSM) Technologies. EAWAG, December 2015. This online course gives an overview of the current knowledge of faecal sludge management treatment technologies and end products within the framework of technical tools that can be used for selecting and designing them.

REPORTS

Co-Composting of Solid Waste and Fecal Sludge for Nutrient and Organic Matter Recovery. International Water Management Institute, 2016. This research paper was prepared to support planners, researchers, development experts and practitioners in their work, by providing practical guidance and the latest knowledge related to co-composting of organic waste from municipal waste streams, including human excreta.

Faecal Sludge Management: WASH in Emergencies Problem Exploration Report.Humanitarian Innovation Fund, 2016. The management of excreta during an emergency in an urban context has very limited options. This report puts forward a few areas for further exploration and development.

Experiences of Developing Pit-Emptying Businesses in East Africa. Stone Family Foundation, 2015. Findings presented at the 2015 WEDC conference from Water and Sanitation for the Urban Poor, Water for People, and WaterAid, which have all tested slightly different approaches to developing pit-emptying businesses in East Africa, with a focus on business models for the manual emptying of pit latrines.

Co-Composting of Solid Waste and Fecal Sludge for Nutrient and Organic Matter Recovery. International Water Management Institute, 2016. This research paper was prepared to support planners, researchers, development experts and practitioners in their work, by providing practical guidance and the latest knowledge related to co-composting of organic waste from municipal waste streams, including human excreta.