Category Archives: Dignity and Social Development

Margaret Batty/WaterAid – Poor globally being failed on sanitation

Margaret Batty/WaterAid – Poor globally being failed on sanitation | Source: The Guardian, Aug 14 2016 |

WaterAid shares the global concern for the world’s top athletes dealing with the sewage in Rio’s bays (Report, 4 August). But the heavily contaminated waters don’t only put at risk the health of Olympians, it’s clear they also adversely affect the millions of people facing this faecal nightmare, day-in and day-out.

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Rubbish along the edge of Guanabara Bay, Rio, the venue for the Olympic sailing events. ‘These Olympic Games have put the spotlight on one of the most urgent yet beatable crises of our time. World leaders must address it,’ writes Margaret Batty of WaterAid. Photograph: Mario Tama/Getty

Despite Brazil being an upper-middle income country, nearly 2% of Brazilians, or 3.5 million people, have no access to clean water, and 17%, or 35 million people, live without good sanitation. In Rio alone, 30% of the population is not connected to a formal sewerage system. It is a travesty that anyone should have to live like this.

Sadly, Brazil is not alone in facing a water and sanitation crisis. One in three people globally live without decent toilets, and one in 10 are without clean water. These Olympic Games have put the spotlight on one of the most urgent yet beatable crises of our time. World leaders must address it.

The UN global goals for sustainable development were agreed by these leaders last year. The challenge now is to put those promises into action, ensuring that everyone, everywhere has clean water and sanitation by 2030.
Margaret Batty
Director of global policy and campaigns, WaterAid

Rio’s waste pickers: ‘People spat at us but now we’re at the Olympics’

Rio’s waste pickers: ‘People spat at us but now we’re at the Olympics’ |Source: The Guardian, Aug 6 2016 |

Rio authorities partner with Coca-Cola to fund the Rio Olympics waste pickers programme, putting a spotlight on one of Brazil’s most marginalised professions 

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Rio 2016’s waste pickers. Photograph: Luiz Galerani

Claudete Da Costa started working as a waste picker with her mother when she was 11 years old, collecting recyclable goods in Rio de Janeiro to sell to scrap merchants.

“We were ashamed,” she says. “People saw us and spat at us, thought we were thieves.”

Today, 36-year-old Da Costa’s outlook has changed. She is the Rio de Janeiro representative for Brazil’s National Movement of Waste Pickers, whose mission is to improve workers’ rights and increase recognition of the contribution made by one of Brazil’s most marginalised professions.

This month, Da Costa and 240 other pickers from 33 of Rio’s waste collecting co-operatives – autonomous groups that collect the city’s rubbish throughout the year – are formally contracted to handle recyclable waste during the Olympic Games.

The pickers will be spread across three of the four Olympic sites – Maracana, Olympic Park and Deodoro – where they will collect recyclable goods such as plastic bottles and aluminium cans, and take them to a depot to be sorted, stored and sold on by the co-ops to scrap merchants.

Read the complete article.

Mainstreaming Waste Pickers in City’s Solid Waste Management System -Swachh Bharat Urban

Mainstreaming Waste Pickers in City’s Solid Waste Management System, 2016. Swachh Bharat Urban

In the second course of this tutorial, Ms. Aparna Susarla, Operations Manager of SWaCH discusses the benefits of engaging waste pickers in the city’s SWM system for waste pickers as well as to the city. We will learn of the segregation of waste, composting of wet waste and sale of recyclables by waste pickers and how this cooperation has helped PMC save almost Rs. 16 crores annually.

2016 WEDC conference presentations on CLTS

The 122 presentations from the 2016 WEDC conference are now online at http://wedc.lu/wedc39 and below are titles of presentations on the topic of community-led total sanitation. wedc_moodle

  1. Building ODF communities through effective collaboration with governments
  2. CLTS plus : making CLTS ever more inclusive
  3. CLTS versus other approaches to promote sanitation: rivalry or complementarity?
  4. Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) in fragile contexts: the Somalia case
  5. Partial usage of toilets: a growing problem
  6. Seeking evidence of sustained sanitation successes
  7. Shocking imagery and cultural sensitivity: a CLTS case study from Madagascar
  8. To ODF and beyond: sharing experiences from the Pan African CLTS programme
  9. Using a CLTS approach and/or CLTS tools in urban environments: themes and trends
  10. Who is managing the post-ODF process in the community? A case study of Nambale District in Western Kenya
  11. Good governance for sustainable WASH programming: lessons from two USAID-funded projects

Gift a toilet to your sister in UP’s Firozabad and become Bhai No 1

Gift a toilet to your sister in UP’s Firozabad and become Bhai No 1 | Source: Hindustan Times, July 22 2016 |

Men in Uttar Pradesh’s Firozabad can become “Bhai No 1” by gifting toilets to their sisters on Raksha Bandhan, under the government’s Swachh Bharat campaign to make the area the first open-defecation-free (ODF) district in the state. _18097c24-5006-11e6-8d8d-a42edc5c5383

And, if the experiment is successful, husbands would have a chance to become ‘Pati No. 1’ on ‘Karwa Chauth’ by gifting toilet to their wife.

Rajeev Nayan Gupta, project coordinator for the Swachh Bharat Mission, said Firozabad was a pioneer when it became the first district to begin community-led total sanitation (CLTS) programme and it now aims to become an ODF district within a year.

“Unfortunately, there had been many who were waiting for government aid of Rs 12,000 to build toilet. But it is not possible to grant aid to those who are capable of getting toilets constructed on their own,” stated Gupta.

“To achieve the target soon, we thought of innovative ideas and discussed them with the district magistrate and got clearance. Now, we are moving ahead with the plan to award the title of ‘Bhai No. 1’.”

Read the complete article.

Sanitation investments in Ghana: An ethnographic investigation of the role of tenure security, land ownership and livelihoods

Sanitation investments in Ghana: An ethnographic investigation of the role of tenure security, land ownership and livelihoods. BMC Public Health, July 2016.  Authors: Y. Awunyo-Akaba, J. Awunyo-Akaba, et. al.

Background – Ghana’s low investment in household sanitation is evident from the low rates of improved sanitation. This study analysed how land ownership, tenancy security and livelihood patterns are related to sanitation investments in three adjacent rural and peri-urban communities in a district close to Accra, Ghana’s capital.

Methods – Qualitative data was gathered for this comparative ethnographic study over seven months, (June, 2011-January, 2012) using an average of 43 (bi-weekly) participant observation per community and 56 in-depth interviews. Detailed observational data from study communities were triangulated with multiple interview material and contextual knowledge on social structures, history of settlement, land use, livelihoods, and access to and perceptions about sanitation.

Results – This study shows that the history of settlement and land ownership issues are highly correlated with people’s willingness and ability to invest in household sanitation across all communities. The status of being a stranger i.e. migrant in the area left some populations without rights over the land they occupied and with low incentives to invest in sanitation, while indigenous communities were challenged by the increasing appropriation of their land for commercial enterprises and for governmental development projects.

Interview responses suggest that increasing migrant population and the high demand for housing in the face of limited available space has resulted in general unwillingness and inability to establish private sanitation facilities in the communities. The increasing population has also created high demand for cheap accommodation, pushing tenants to accept informal tenancy agreements that provided for poor sanitation facilities.

In addition, poor knowledge of tenancy rights leaves tenants in no position to demand sanitation improvements and therefore landlords feel no obligation or motivation to provide and maintain domestic sanitation facilities.

Conclusions – The study states that poor land rights, the history of settlements, in-migration and insecure tenancy are key components that are associated with local livelihoods and investments in private sanitation in rapidly changing rural and peri-urban communities of Ghana. Sanitation policy makers and programme managers must acknowledge that these profound local, ethnic and economic forces are shaping people’s abilities and motivations for sanitation investments.

Enabling factors for the existence of waste pickers: A systematic review

Enabling factors for the existence of waste pickers: A systematic reviewSocial work (Stellenbosch. Online) vol.52 n.1 Stellenbosch 2016. Authors: Rinie Schenck; Derick Blaauw; Kotie Viljoen.

The paper reports on a systematic review research process to determine the enabling factors for waste pickers to operate in the informal economy in South Africa. Twenty-eight South African journal articles, theses and position and policy papers were sourced and appraised.

The results indicate that recognition of the waste pickers in the waste system is the most enabling factor for them to operate. The concept of recognition is analysed, described and explained as assisting waste pickers to become more visible, having a voice and to be validated.