Designing the next generation of sanitation businesses

Designing the next generation of sanitation businesses: a report by HYSTRA for the Toilet Board Coalition, 2014hystrasanitation_4pp_web-1

Fortunately, a number of market-based models have emerged in both rural and urban areas to address the sanitation crisis. They all serve the Base of the Pyramid in a sustainable manner by offering improved solutions, at a price that the poor are willing and able to pay. In this Report, we analyze two models that combine an aspirational value proposition for low-income families and a strong potential for financial sustainability: projects that facilitate the creation of a local, sanitation market in rural areas and enterprises servicing home mobile toilets in urban areas.

Based on an in-depth analysis of 12 projects representative of these two models, the Report suggests strategies to overcome challenges to sustainability and scale. Finally, the Report explores how these models would benefit from corporate and industrial expertise and resources, opening up opportunities for large corporations to contribute to solving the sanitation crisis.

Video: 7 journalists win prestigious media awards for excellence in reporting on critical water, sanitation and hygiene issues

Sandec Eawag – Behind the Data: The People Who Make Research Happen

Published on Sep 12, 2014 -“Behind The Data: The People Who Make Research Happen” is a short documentary, highlighting the work that was done in rural communities by the people who were instrumental in collecting and recording data for a sanitation-based research project. We aim to show the fundamental value of each person’s role in achieving the ultimate research objectives.

IRC WASH – The ideal WASH sustainability tool

If you could start from scratch and design a new WASH sustainability tool, what would it look like?

Participants from the 2014 WASH Sustainability Forum share their ideas on the principles of their ideal WASH sustainability tool.

The 2014 WASH Sustainability Forum brought together over 150 participants from nearly 30 countries to discuss concrete approaches to Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Sustainability. The Forum took place in Amsterdam, on 30 June and 1 July. 2014. More info: http://www.ircwash.org/news/5th-wash-…and #WASH2014

With inputs from:
Charles Yeboah (Safe Water Network), Barbara Evans (University of Leeds), Chaitaili Chattopadhyah (WSSCC), Prakhar Goel (Control Union), Joanne McGriff (Center for Global Safe Water, Emory University), Jose Gesti Canuto (UNICEF), Guy Norman (WSUP), Julia Rosenbaum (USAID/WASHplus), Naabiah Ofosuh-Amaah (Global Environment & Technology Foundation).

Interview: Cor Dietvorst.
Camera: Thomas Hurkxkens

Pacific Love (Unofficial Peace Corps Anthem) – Poop in a Hole

Focus on WASH & Nutrition: WASHplus Weekly, Sept 5, 2014

Issue 160 | Sept 5, 2014 | Focus on WASH & Nutrition

This issue contains some of the most recent studies on stunting, open defecation, nutritional interventions, and other WASH and nutrition issues. Recent reports from the World Bank Water and Sanitation Program discuss the impacts of improved sanitation on child growth in Vietnam and Lao PDR. Training materials include the new Global Handwashing Day guide from the Global Public-Private Partnership on Handwashing and a WASHplus infographic on tippy taps.

BLOG POSTS WASHPlus_HTMLbanner_weekly_600x159

Left, Right, and Toilets. Ideas for India, Aug 2014. D Spears. (Link)
Eliminating open defecation in India is a policy priority. This column contends that successful strategies for reducing open defecation may not fit policy stereotypes of the left or the right. While rural sanitation policy in states where this practice is most concentrated has been focused on latrine construction, promotion of latrine use is what will make a difference.

What Do Toilets Have To Do with Nutrition? More Than You Might Think. IFPRI Blog, July 2014. L Haddad. (Link)
A new working paper from the Institute of Development Studies has looked at data from 116 low- and middle-income countries from 1970 to 2012. It found that access to safe water (20 percent) and improved sanitation (15 percent) explained 35 percent of the variation in stunting rates across countries and time periods. This reflects two things: the fact that water and sanitation are strongly linked to stunting reduction, and that both water and sanitation coverage have increased strongly in the past four decades.

JOURNAL ARTICLES BY PUBLICATION DATE

The Effect of India’s Total Sanitation Campaign on Defecation Behaviors and Child Health in Rural Madhya Pradesh: A Cluster Randomized Controlled TrialPLoS Medicine, Aug 2014. R Sumeet. (Link)
The objective of this study is to measure the effect of the Total Sanitation Campaign implemented with capacity building support from The World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program in Madhya Pradesh on availability of individual household latrines (IHLs), defecation behaviors, and child health (diarrhea, highly credible gastrointestinal illness [HCGI], parasitic infections, anemia, and growth). The intervention led to modest increases in availability of IHLs and even more modest reductions in open defecation. These improvements were insufficient to improve child health outcomes. The results underscore the difficulty of achieving adequately large improvements in sanitation levels to deliver expected health benefits within large-scale rural sanitation programs.

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Seven journalists win prestigious media awards for excellence in reporting on critical water, sanitation and hygiene issues

WMA-Winners

Geneva/Stockholm, 5 September 2014 – Seven journalists were named today as winners of the “2014 WASH Media Awards” competition for their excellence in reporting on water, sanitation and hygiene-related (WASH) issues.

 The journalists, their winning entries, and the award categories are:

  • Marcelo Leite (Brazil):The Battle of Belo Monte” (Category: Water and Energy)
  • Natasha Khan (Canada) and Ketaki Gokhale (USA) No Menstrual Hygiene For Indian Women Holds Economy Back(Category: Equity and Inclusion in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene)
  • Seun Aikoye (Nigeria):Lagosians shun public toilets as open defecation continues(Category: Ending Open Defecation)
  • Mbali Chiya (South Africa):Human Rights to Water and Sanitation (Category: The Human Right to Water and Sanitation)
  • Umaru Sanda Amadu (Ghana): “Water Wahala(Category: WASH in the Future: The Post-2015 Development Agenda)
  • Dilrukshi Handunnetti (Sri Lanka): “Sri Lankan Girls Miss out on Sanitation Gains(Category: Monitoring WASH Commitments)

The winning entries can be viewed here: http://www.wsscc.org/media/wash-media-awards/2012-2014. A high resolution photograph and summary video can also be found there or at the World Water Week page.

The winners received their awards today during a ceremony at the closing plenary session of the annual World Water Week in Stockholm.  In Stockholm this week, the journalists shared their experiences with leading water, sanitation, environment and development experts. The week concluded with a 2014 Stockholm Statement on Water, a collection of films and papers calling for a Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) on Water.

Journalists are key partners for sanitation, hygiene and water sector professionals in their awareness raising, advocacy and behaviour change work. Journalists play a central role in the highlighting of water and gender related issues and positioning of women as environmental leaders. They greatly contribute to bringing in the spotlight the too often neglected issues of the necessity of toilets and hand washing for a dignified, safe and healthy life for billions of people.

The biannual WASH Media Awards competition is sponsored by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC, www.wsscc.org) and the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI, www.siwi.org). More than 100 entries from 30 countries were evaluated by a Mr. Mark Tran, a notable international correspondent for The Guardian, UK.