Call for proposals: evaluation Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene for All Programme in Cambodia

SNV calls for proposals for an evaluation of the Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene for All Programme in Cambodia (re-advertised)

SNV regularly commissions evaluations of a selected group of its projects. In 2014-2015, SNV is commissioning two project evaluations in each of its three main sectors of work. These sectors are Agriculture, WASH and Renewable Energy. This request for proposals covers the evaluation of SNVs Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene for All Programme in Cambodia.

The evaluation will take place in the period March 2015 – September 2015.

In case you are interested in conducting this evaluation, please have a look at the Terms of Reference.

Closing date: Sunday, January 25, 2015

Type of contract: Consultancy

Making WASH facilities accessible for the disabled and elderly

Horizontal handrail the full width of the door on the inside. Internal bolt.

Horizontal handrail the full width of the door on the inside. Internal bolt. Credit: WaterAid/Stephen Sagawa

WaterAid has published a compendium of low-cost technologies to improve the accessibility of household WASH facilities for the disabled and elderly in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa. There are sections on reaching facilities, latrines, bathing, waterpoints and handwashing. It can be used by staff such as health workers and community volunteers.

Cover - Compedium of accessible WASH technologies

The compendium and all images in it are free to download at: www.wateraid.org/accessibleWASHtechnologies

Related web sites:

UNEP launches awareness raising video on wastewater and oceans

A new short video “Wastewater: A widespread threat and missed resource” highlights the impacts of wastewater on coastal communities and ecosystems, and the benefits of improving its management. It is part of a series of ocean awareness videos titled Two Minutes on Oceans with Jim Toomey,  a collaboration between the popular American cartoonist Toomey and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

Related web site:  UNEP/GPA Global Wastewater Initiative (GW2I) – unep.org/gpa/gwi/gwi.asp

Read more: UNEP Launches Wastewater Video in the Series Two Minutes on Oceans with Jim Toomey, UNEP, 9 Dec 2014

- See more at: http://www.unep.org/newscentre/Default.aspx?DocumentID=2814&ArticleID=11102&l=en#sthash.UiDPanv0.dpuf

2014 issues of the WASHplus Weekly

Below are links to the 2014 issues of the WASHplus Weekly. There were 8 issues on HAP/cookstoves, 4 issues on WASH & Nutrition, 2 issues on handwashing, and 8 issues on CLTS and other sanitation topics. Other topics include Learning from Failure, Ebola and WASH-related diseases, Multiple-Use Water Services, etc. WASHPlus_HTMLbanner_weekly_600x159

2014

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PLoS One – Does Global Progress on Sanitation Really Lag behind Water?

Does Global Progress on Sanitation Really Lag behind Water? An Analysis of Global Progress on Community- and Household-Level Access to Safe Water and Sanitation. PLoS One, Dec 2014.

Authors: Oliver Cumming, Mark Elliott, Alycia Overbo, Jamie Bartram

Safe drinking water and sanitation are important determinants of human health and wellbeing and have recently been declared human rights by the international community. Increased access to both were included in the Millennium Development Goals under a single dedicated target for 2015. This target was reached in 2010 for water but sanitation will fall short; however, there is an important difference in the benchmarks used for assessing global access.

For drinking water the benchmark is community-level access whilst for sanitation it is household-level access, so a pit latrine shared between households does not count toward the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target. We estimated global progress for water and sanitation under two scenarios: with equivalent household- and community-level benchmarks.

Our results demonstrate that the “sanitation deficit” is apparent only when household-level sanitation access is contrasted with community-level water access. When equivalent benchmarks are used for water and sanitation, the global deficit is as great for water as it is for sanitation, and sanitation progress in the MDG-period (1990–2015) outstrips that in water.

As both drinking water and sanitation access yield greater benefits at the household-level than at the community-level, we conclude that any post–2015 goals should consider a household-level benchmark for both.

Grand Challenge: Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is launching a new Grand Challenge: Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development. This challenge focuses on how to effectively reach and empower the most vulnerable women and girls to improve health and development – including economic – outcomes as well as gender equality.

Women_girls_350x233

Gender inequalities and the marginalization of the needs, roles and potential of women and girls are key factors limiting advances in development outcomes for all – women, men, boys, girls and their communities and societies around the world. Moreover, strong associations have been identified between addressing inequalities and enhancing women and girls’ empowerment and agency, and improved development outcomes across sectors, ranging from maternal, newborn, and child health and nutrition to agriculture, water, sanitation, hygiene and financial services for the poor.

The ultimate goal of this challenge is to accelerate discovery of how to most effectively and intentionally identify and address gender inequalities and how this relates to sectoral outcomes; scale-up approaches known to work, in context-relevant ways; and do more to develop better measures of the impact of approaches to enhance women’s and girls’ empowerment and agency. Intentional efforts and strategies are required so that development can contribute more to gender equality and gender equality can contribute more to development.

Grants will go to investigators in low- and middle-income countries, but we encourage partnerships with investigators in other countries, especially where the opportunity exists to build on existing collaborations.

BBC News – Poor water and hygiene ‘kills mothers and newborns’

Poor water and hygiene ‘kills mothers and newborns’ | By Smitha Mundasad, Health reporter, BBC News, Dec 13, 2014.

Many mothers and newborns are dying because of a lack of sanitation, safe water and hygiene while giving birth, leading health experts have warned.

They say the lack of such basic facilities is hindering the success of other interventions to improve the health of newborn babies.

In some clinics in Tanzania pregnant women are asked to bring their own water supplies

In some clinics in Tanzania pregnant women are asked to bring their own water supplies

They’ve called on governments and agencies to focus more on the link between sanitation and saving lives.

Sanitation ‘ignored’

They say that while the importance of hygiene – for example, hand washing – is being recognised in some places, much less consideration is given to the complete package of safe water, hygiene and sanitation.

In some cases sanitation – toilets and facilities to dispose of waste – is being ignored.

Nearly 40% of health facilities in 54 low-income countries do not have reliable clean water, according to the World Health Organization.

The report suggests that many efforts to improve newborn health focus on specific measures, sometimes at the expense of these basic facilities.

And it argues that the lack of ways to dispose of waste safely could hamper the success of other interventions.

The experts behind the report say governments and agencies should pay much greater attention to the link between sanitation and saving mothers’ and babies’ lives.